GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Thrifting Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Thrifting Statistics

  • 90% of all clothing donated to thrift stores are sold off rather than used for charity purposes.
  • 16-18% of Americans shop at thrift stores every year.
  • The global resale market is predicted to hit $64 billion by 2025.
  • Resale spending is expected to grow nearly 2X faster than traditional off-price retail over the next 10 years.
  • 61% of women who thrift are motivated by finding good deals.
  • Women who thrift shop spend 66% more per transaction than traditional retail shoppers.
  • Only 15% of donated clothing is sold in US thrift stores, the rest is exported or recycled.
  • 79% of consumers are willing to switch to secondhand clothes for environmental reasons.
  • Men are 67% more likely to purchase electronic goods while thrifting, compared to women.
  • The global online resale market is expected to reach $36 billion by 2024.
  • About 70% of people have bought or are open to buying secondhand.
  • 45% of people have sold their used goods, or are open to doing so.
  • Used apparel market is said to double from $28 billion to $64 billion in five years.
  • The average American throws away approximately 80 pounds of used clothing per person per year.
  • It’s estimated that 95% of the clothing thrown away could be reused or recycled.
  • Around 10% of the world’s total carbon footprint comes from the apparel industry.
  • The online resale market alone is experiencing a yearly growth rate of 35%.

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Delve into the fascinating world of thrift shopping as we unravel valuable data and trends dominating this distinctive sphere of retail. This blog post will present you with intriguing data on thrifting statistics, encapsulating the rise in popularity of pre-loved items, environmental impacts, demographic preferences and much more. Whether you’re a seasoned thrift shopper, casual environmentalist, or just curious about the thrift shopping phenomenon, our comprehensive collection of statistics promises to pique your interest and possibly transform your shopping habits.

The Latest Thrifting Statistics Unveiled

90% of all clothing donated to thrift stores are sold off rather than used for charity purposes.

Delving into the world of thrift stores, it’s intriguing to note that an overwhelming 90% of all clothing donated isn’t directly benefitting charitable causes as many may assume. This stark figure undeniably splashes a dash of cold reality onto our preconceptions, profoundly illuminating the actual trajectory of our benevolent donations. In the larger narrative of sustainability and charitable giving, this statistic steers the conversation towards the effectiveness, economic dynamics, and the social impact of thrift stores—an aspect that would likely resonate with thrift enthusiasts and casual donors alike, offering a nuanced perspective to understand thrift stores’ operations within the broader socio-economic framework.

16-18% of Americans shop at thrift stores every year.

In the bustling thrift economy, one can’t overlook the striking detail that 16-18% of Americans choose thrift stores for their shopping ventures each year. Illustrious in the blog post, this figure stands as a compelling testament to the significant traction that thrifting has carved out in the consumers’ landscape. It opens a window into the expanding consciousness of cost-effectiveness and sustainability among the American populace. Furthermore, it’s an economic indicator advocating thrift stores’ potential as a lucrative business sector and presents a veiled opportunity for potential investors and entrepreneurs in the retail industry.

The global resale market is predicted to hit $64 billion by 2025.

Peering into the crystal ball of future thrifting trends, an astounding figure leaps into view – a whopping $64 billion by 2025. An emblem of the explosive growth trajectory of the global resale market, this number signifies not only a shift in consumer preferences towards more sustainable shopping choices but also the democratization of luxury, giving consumers access to high-end brands at affordable prices. As such, authors writing about thrifting can leverage this statistic to illustrate the thriving momentum, potential financial opportunity, and the considerable incline in popularity that thrifting is catapulting towards in modern-day society.

Resale spending is expected to grow nearly 2X faster than traditional off-price retail over the next 10 years.

Unveiling a new horizon in retail trends, the projected swift expansion of resale spending, at nearly double the pace of traditional off-price retail in the forthcoming decade, paints a compelling picture. Within the thrifting milieu, this suggests the escalating prominence of sustainability-conscious consumers gravitating towards pre-loved items, marking a definitive paradigm shift. Such dynamism in consumer behavior offers fresh insights into understanding changing shopping patterns, signaling opportunities for stakeholders to align strategies and services with this robust growth trend in the second-hand market. This rising tide in the thrifting domain strengthens the case for businesses and policy-makers to closely track transitions in this market and navigate their sail accordingly.

61% of women who thrift are motivated by finding good deals.

Unveiling a fascinating insight, the figure reveals that a substantial 61% of female thrift shoppers are driven by the thrill of the hunt for valuable bargains. This figure not only demonstrates the growing economic consciousness among women but also the changing frugal fashion perspectives, thereby placing thrifting at the heart of a wider socioeconomic trend. In the landscape of thrifting, this key statistic underscores the embedded allure of affordability while simultaneously giving bloggers a platform to promote monetary savvy and sustainable choices that resonate with their female readership.

Women who thrift shop spend 66% more per transaction than traditional retail shoppers.

Delving into the realm of thrifting statistics, we unearth an intriguing facet of consumer behavior – that women engaged in thrift shopping expend 66% more per transaction compared to their counterparts in traditional retail. This numerical nuance paints a broader picture of consumer dynamics, underlining the profound shift in spending patterns associated with thrift shopping. This stark contrast resonates with the rising interest in sustainable consumerism and uncovers a potential untapped market. Further, it ignites discussions concerning the impact of thrifting on retail businesses, and how they might adapt or respond. Ultimately, it augments the dialogue, contributing significantly to a deeper understanding of thrifting and its role in the evolving consumer landscape.

Only 15% of donated clothing is sold in US thrift stores, the rest is exported or recycled.

Shining a light on the unexpected, the statistic revealing a mere 15% of donated clothing finding a shelf in US thrift stores does more than just raise brows – it dramatically underscores the global impact of our local sartorial hand-offs. Clearly illustrating that the innocuous act of clothing donation breathes life into a pulsating international industry, which exports or recycles a staggering 85% of received items, this single data point paints a powerful picture of thrift culture extending far beyond our local stores, influencing economies and ecological initiatives on a worldwide scale.

79% of consumers are willing to switch to secondhand clothes for environmental reasons.

Showcasing the remarkable statistic in a blog post about thrifting statistics drives home the point that a significant turning tide in consumer behavior is underway. A staggering 79% of consumers indicating their willingness to switch to secondhand clothes for environmental reasons not only underscores the growing environmental consciousness among buyers but also paints a promising picture for the popularity and potential profitability of thrift shops. These findings poignantly emphasise how thrift shopping is no longer just a trend but a sustainable strategy gaining momentum in the fight against fast fashion and environmental degradation.

Men are 67% more likely to purchase electronic goods while thrifting, compared to women.

The statistic that men are 67% more likely to purchase electronic goods during thrifting adventures, compared to women, serves as a compass for marketers and thrift store owners to navigate the ever-evolving landscape of thrifting. In a blog post dealing with thrifting statistics, such insights can contribute to a more targeted marketing approach, fine-tuning the inventory, designing unique offers, and creating a customer-focused store layout. Ultimately, with a detailed understanding of consumers’ purchasing habits within the thrifting market like this, thrift retailers can optimally utilize their resources and maximize sales, thus, it is important to highlight such data.

The global online resale market is expected to reach $36 billion by 2024.

Peering into the future, we paint an intriguing picture of the resurgence of the second-hand marketplace spurred on by the online revolution. An astounding forecast indicates our market swelling to a whopping $36 billion by 2024. This estimation promises fireworks for the world of thrifting, creating a treasure trove of opportunity. This colossal figure provides a testament to the increasing global acceptance and enthusiasm towards preloved apparel. The anticipation stirs, revealing the enormous potential the bustling world of online resale holds, shaping a new chapter in thrifting statistics.

About 70% of people have bought or are open to buying secondhand.

Illuminating the thrifting landscape, the telling statistic that approximately 70% of consumers have purchased, or are open to purchasing, secondhand items, holds considerable importance. It underscores the swelling wave of acceptance for pre-owned goods, curating a narrative of an eco-conscious, value-seeking, and trend-embracing consumer culture integral to our understanding within the sphere of thrifting statistics. This detail not only reveals the potential growth opportunities for thrift stores and platforms but also emphasises the ever-increasing willingness of contemporary shoppers to explore sustainable and financially practical choices, marking a decisive shift from the norms of fast fashion.

45% of people have sold their used goods, or are open to doing so.

Seizing the imagination of online deal-seekers, the captivating statistic – ‘45% of individuals have either sold their used items or are amenable to such transactions’ echoes an intriguing dimension of the thrifting ecosystem for our readers. Capturing the potential for a burgeoning secondhand market, this figure reveals a growing trend of consumer-to-consumer sales, underpinning the emergence of a more sustainable, circular economy. As testament to the changing dynamics of our consumerist society, it holds up a mirror to the evolving attitudes towards consumption and waste reduction, delivering a powerful call to action for fashion enthusiasts delving into thrifting, be it for financial, environmental or style diversity reasons.

Used apparel market is said to double from $28 billion to $64 billion in five years.

As we navigate the captivating world of thrifting through this blog, let’s allow a striking statistic to set the stage. Picture this: a colossal leap in the used apparel market, doubling from a hearty $28 billion to an astounding $64 billion in a short span of five years. This spectacular surge exemplifies the metamorphosis of thrifting from a niche pursuit to a mainstream trend. It highlights the gradual shift in consumer behavior towards sustainable fashion, contributing to a reduction in waste. Furthermore, it underscores the enormous potential for entrepreneurs and businesses keen on tapping into this rapidly burgeoning sector. Just as these numbers paint a vivid picture, so do the following thrilling tales of thrifting, each woven with numbers and narratives that mirror this vibrant, burgeoning market.

The average American throws away approximately 80 pounds of used clothing per person per year.

Highlighting the staggering figure of approximately 80 pounds of used clothes discarded per person per year by Americans is essential to quantify the potential of thrifting to curtail textile waste. Within a blog post dedicated to thrifting statistics, this figure lays the foundation to advocate for pre-loved fashion, demonstrating how thrifting can be part of a waste reduction strategy in fashion consumption. This stark statistic brings into focus the crucial role each individual can play in creating a sustainable fashion ecosystem and thereby inherently promotes thrift shopping.

It’s estimated that 95% of the clothing thrown away could be reused or recycled.

Underscoring the importance of conservation, the staggering revelation that a colossal 95% of dumped apparel could have renewed life through reuse or recycling forms the backbone of the thrifting narrative. With landfill sites bulging under the pressure of fashion’s wasteful footprint, this statistic brings to the fore the dire need for more sustainable and thrifty consumption habits. Encapsulating thrift shopping’s potential in mitigating this environmental crisis, it paints a vivid image of the unexplored treasures lying wastefully beneath piles of discarded clothes- an image that resonates powerfully with the ethos of thrift and circular fashion economy.

Around 10% of the world’s total carbon footprint comes from the apparel industry.

Delving into the world of thrifting statistics, one cannot ignore the staggering reality that the apparel industry is responsible for about 10% of the world’s total carbon footprint. This divulgence underscores an unavoidable connection between our fashion choices and their environmental repercussions. Purchasing second-hand clothes or ‘thrifting’ emerges as more than just a pocket-friendly trend, it is an eco-friendly habit that tackles this environmental issue head-on. By choosing to thrift, consumers indirectly cut down on the demand for new clothes, leading to less production, hence a reduction in the industry’s carbon emissions. This serves as a compelling rationale for the promotion of thrifting, which is not merely a frugality-driven or fashion statement, but a green initiative that holds merit in combating global warming.

The online resale market alone is experiencing a yearly growth rate of 35%.

Delving into the thrifting trend, this statistic paints a vivid picture of a market, once perceived as unused or discarded, becoming a thriving industry. Experiencing a yearly growth rate of 35% in the online resale market, the thrifting universe is notching escalating triumphs, and that’s worth noting. This robust growth showcases a heightened consumer shift towards more sustainable and budget-friendly shopping methods, developing an eco-conscious ethos, all wrapped up into a trend now hitting the mainstream. As such, the transform of thrifting from niche sidelines to an explosive online market growth uncovers a potential powerhouse in the retail world, an element that warrants thorough exploration within the thrifting statistics discourse.

Conclusion

In light of the data examined, thrifting has undeniably propagated an eco-friendly and economical shopping trend worldwide. The significant growth rates in the secondhand market and high participation in thrifting particularly among Gen Z and millennials, back up this cultural shift. The economic downturn and increased environmental consciousness are tremendous contributors to this trend. Furthermore, as consumers embrace the notion of unique, vintage finds, businesses should seize the opportunity in the thrift market, thus championing sustainability while catering to contemporary consumer demands.

References

0. – https://www.www.greenbiz.com

1. – https://www.www.newsweek.com

2. – https://www.poshmark.com

3. – https://www.www.cnbc.com

4. – https://www.www.refinery29.com

5. – https://www.www.worldbank.org

6. – https://www.www.retaildive.com

7. – https://www.www.fashionrevolution.org

8. – https://www.www.businessinsider.com

9. – https://www.waste360.com

10. – https://www.www.valuevillage.com

11. – https://www.s3.amazonaws.com

FAQs

What percentage of people thrift shop regularly?

The percentages can greatly vary depending on the region, but it's believed that around 16-18% of Americans shop at thrift stores regularly.

What is the average amount of money saved by thrifting?

This figure can greatly vary, but on average, a consumer might save around 50-70% off retail prices by thrifting depending on the item and the thrift store's pricing structure.

What is the growth rate of the thrifting market?

The resale market, including thrifting, is one of the fastest-growing sectors in retail, with an annual growth rate of about 20%.

What percentage of clothing in an average person's closet is thrifted?

Studies indicate that about 5-10% of the clothing in an average person’s wardrobe might be thrifted, but again, this percentage can greatly vary based on personal preferences and habits.

How much does the average thrifter spend per shopping trip?

On average, thrift store shoppers might spend around $15-30 per shopping trip, but this number can depend greatly on the individual shopper and what they're in the market for.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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