GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Sunscreen Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Sunscreen Statistics

  • 43% of the U.S. population never apply sunscreen, though the usage is higher amongst women (42%) than men (27%).
  • Sunscreen market is expected to be worth $24.9 billion globally by 2024.
  • 9.2% of adults reported using sunscreen all the time or most of the time in the past 12 months.
  • Only 37% of women and 16% of men regularly use sunscreen on their face and other exposed skin.
  • Individuals who use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher daily show 24% less skin aging than those who do not use sunscreen daily.
  • More than half (61%) of young adults believe people look healthier with a tan.
  • 55% increase in sales of facial sunscreens in the year 2018.
  • Only 47% of Americans usually or always use sunscreen when outside for more than an hour on a sunny day.
  • The global sun care product market size was estimated at USD 11.5 billion in 2019.
  • More than half (53%) of parents don’t reapply sunscreen to their kids after they have been swimming.
  • 69% of Americans do not know the correct way to apply sunscreen (at least 15 minutes before going into the sun).
  • Willingness to pay for sunscreen increases by 13.6% per SPF unit increase.
  • 48% of young people have been sunburnt in the last year, despite most sunscreen users knowing that it helps to prevent skin cancer.
  • 14% of men compared to 30% of women wear sunscreen every day.
  • The male sunscreen market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 5.1% between 2016 and 2024.

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As we journey into the realm of sun protection and skincare, let’s take a deep dive into the fascinating world of sunscreen statistics. Assessing numbers and data can provide intriguing insights into trends, usage patterns, and the overall importance of sunscreen in safeguarding our skin from harmful ultraviolet rays. This blog post aims to present an illuminating perspective about the sunscreen industry, market dynamics, consumer behaviors, and the prevailing trends influencing sunscreen usage across the globe. Join us as we explore complex statistics, simplified to understand how sunscreen affects not just our health, but also impacts environmental and business landscapes worldwide.

The Latest Sunscreen Statistics Unveiled

43% of the U.S. population never apply sunscreen, though the usage is higher amongst women (42%) than men (27%).

In the radiant narrative of sunscreen statistics, the revelation that a substantial 43% of the U.S. population shuns the application of sunscreen paints a stark picture. This insight reiterates the pressing need for more extensive educational campaigns focused on the importance of sun protection. The gender disparity illustrated by the higher usage rates among women (42%) compared to men (27%) further underscores a call to tailor these messages to reach different audiences effectively. This knowledge shapes the understanding of sunscreen usage trends, helping to craft targeted strategies that encourage broader adoption of sun-protective habits.

Sunscreen market is expected to be worth $24.9 billion globally by 2024.

Forecasting a whopping $24.9 billion global value by 2024, the sunscreen market is no longer simply about shielding skin from the sun. This immense figure underscores a dynamic shift in consumer behavior and industry innovation, forming a catalyst for change in skincare routines, product developments, and marketing strategies worldwide. In the realm of sunscreen statistics, this trillion-dollar prediction reflects the increasing importance of sun protection, the influence of beauty and health trends, and the promising opportunities for both established and emerging market players in the sunscreen industry.

9.2% of adults reported using sunscreen all the time or most of the time in the past 12 months.

Diving into the sunscreen realm, one might be intrigued by the revelation that a mere 9.2% of adults confessed to applying sunscreen consistently or regularly within the yesteryear. In a world increasingly wary of the sun’s harmful UV radiation and enthusiastic about skin health, this figure paints a grim picture of sunscreen use. Highlighting an urgent call to action, it throws light on the vast opportunities for educating 90.8% of adults who are yet to incorporate this crucial protective measure into their daily routine, thus adding value to this blog post on Sunscreen Statistics.

Only 37% of women and 16% of men regularly use sunscreen on their face and other exposed skin.

Delving into the world of sunscreen habits brings to light some striking findings: 37% of women and a sparse 16% of men routinely protect their faces and other exposed skin with sunscreen. These numbers underscore a critical healthcare conversation in our blog-post about Sunscreen Statistics: the dramatic lack of habitual sunscreen use. Despite extensive public health campaigns detailing the risks of skin cancer and sun damage, a significant majority still skimp on this crucial skincare step. For the discerning reader, these percentages aren’t mere numbers but are a cautionary tale of neglecting skin health, underscoring the urgent need for amplified sunscreen education and promotion.

Individuals who use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher daily show 24% less skin aging than those who do not use sunscreen daily.

Illuminating this data point takes us a step beyond the periphery of sunburn or skin cancer prevention; it forefronts the claim of sunscreen as an incredible tool in the arsenal against visible skin aging. It suggests that the daily use of sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher can act as a physical time machine, potentially dialing back the clock by preserving skin’s youthful appearance. This 24% decrease in skin aging underscores sunscreen’s significance not just in beach bags but in everyday skincare routines across all seasons. Harnessing the power of sunscreen, we can proactively guard our skin from the ravages of time and environment, consciously dodging premature wrinkles, sun spots, and sagging skin, letting age be just a number and not a reflection in the mirror.

More than half (61%) of young adults believe people look healthier with a tan.

Unveiling a revealing truth, the statistic that 61% of young adults perceive a tanned look as a symbol of health, punctuates a critical notion in our discussion revolving around Sunscreen Statistics. This perception not only underscores the aesthetic priorities of the younger generation, but also gives a special emphasis on the sunscreen industries’ challenge to promote their product against this widespread belief. Subsequently, it heightens the demand for strategic communication and education to emphasize the pivotal role of sunscreen in regulating healthy skin, counteracting the narrative that tanned skin equals good health.

55% increase in sales of facial sunscreens in the year 2018.

In the sun-kissed narrative of sunscreen statistics drips a startling revelation – a staggering 55% leap in sales of facial sunscreens registered in the zenith year of 2018. This pronounced surge portrays a discerning consumer trend, pointing out an escalating cognizance towards skin care and stands as a resounding testimony to the burgeoning significance individuals are attributing to sun protection. With this backdrop, we unearth a profound transformation in sunscreen purchasing attitudes which silently echoes the growing influence of health-orientated marketing, an insight that brands in the beauty ecosystem can harness to recalibrate their strategies.

Only 47% of Americans usually or always use sunscreen when outside for more than an hour on a sunny day.

From the lens of a statistical analyst, the figure that underlines only 47% of Americans habitually or regularly apply sunscreen during prolonged exposure on a sunny day paints a compelling narrative about sunscreen usage in the context of a blog post focused on Sunscreen Statistics. This percentage essentially lays out the audience’s level of awareness and commitment to adequate sun protection, illustrating a critical need for effective educational campaigns and awareness programs. Moreover, it offers valuable insight for companies producing and marketing sunscreens, emphasizing a potential untapped customer base. Lastly, this statistic allows for an examination of possible links between this degree of sunscreen usage and sun-related health issues such as skin cancer, thereby substantiating the importance of preventative measures and clinical examinations.

The global sun care product market size was estimated at USD 11.5 billion in 2019.

Highlighting the estimated global sun care product market size as USD 11.5 billion in 2019 is a powerful catalyst in comprehending the magnitude and scale of the sunscreen industry. It reflects not only the substantial consumer demand for sun protection products, but also the crucial role sunscreens play in public health policy and personal skincare routines. The massive market value suggests that sun care products, including sunscreens, have a broad global reach – a fact that endorses the extensive consciousness about the perilous effects of sun exposure. This statistic anchors a deep dive into sunscreen usage trends, company market shares, regional sales data, and the science behind sun-protection.

More than half (53%) of parents don’t reapply sunscreen to their kids after they have been swimming.

“Focusing a spotlight on the aforementioned figure not only underlines a prevalent yet critical oversight in sun-protection habits among parents, but also catapults the burning discussion about the harmful effects of UV radiation and importance of proper sunscreen use into the reader’s perspective. The statistic, indicating that more than half (53%) of parents don’t reapply sunscreen to their kids after swimming, unearths a concerning trend in our society’s awareness about the reduced efficacy of sunscreen post water-exposure. Consequently, in the broader discourse revolving around Sunscreen Statistics, this piece of data lends credibility to the urgency to educate individuals about correct sunscreen application, thereby putting forward an effective strategy against sun damage and skin cancer risks.”

69% of Americans do not know the correct way to apply sunscreen (at least 15 minutes before going into the sun).

Delving into the realm of sunscreen statistics, one nugget shines particularly bright – an alarming 69% of Americans are not privy to the right way of applying sunscreen, that is, applying it at least 15 minutes before sun exposure. This throws a startling light on a realm of public health that is often overlooked, revealing a concerning gap in widespread skin protection knowledge, which, if rectified, could potentially reduce instances of sunburn and long-term UV damage. Within the larger discourse of our blog post about Sunscreen Statistics, this percentage underscores the pressing need for more extensive and effective education strategies surrounding sun protection, while also highlighting the opportunity for brands to leverage this space by promoting correct sunscreen application methods.

Willingness to pay for sunscreen increases by 13.6% per SPF unit increase.

In the radiant backdrop of any discourse on Sunscreen Statistics, the statistic ‘Willingness to pay for sunscreen increases by 13.6% per SPF unit increase’, emerges as a telling testament of consumer behavior and product valuation. It dynamically illuminates how consumers attribute a tangible premium to higher SPF (Sun Protection Factor) units in sunscreen, viewing them not just as luxury add-ons, but essential attributes for adequate sun protection. This not only underscores the market’s growing cognizance and demand for sun protection products but also prompts manufacturers to focus on enhancing the SPF qualities of their sunscreen offerings to meet consumer needs and expectations, while also reaping significant financial perks.

48% of young people have been sunburnt in the last year, despite most sunscreen users knowing that it helps to prevent skin cancer.

Illuminate the darker side of a sunny day with this critical information — in recent studies, nearly half of all youths experienced sunburn within the year, an alarming number when considering how well understood sunscreeen’s protective benefits are against skin cancer. Radiating an urgent message about the necessity of sunscreen use and re-application, this statistic compellingly underscorse the disconnect between knowledge and action, a gap demanding to be addressed for a healthier, sun-smart generation.

14% of men compared to 30% of women wear sunscreen every day.

The radiating fact that only 14% of men in comparison to 30% of women daily apply sunscreen unveils a significant gender difference in skincare routines and sun protection measures. This intriguing disparity is pivotal in a Sunscreen Statistics blog post as it sheds light on the urgent need for more health awareness campaigns, precisely targeting men. Determining this gender inclination towards sunscreen usage not only paves the way for manufacturers to tailor their marketing strategies but also empowers healthcare professionals with valuable insights to bridge the gap in preventive skin care, ultimately reducing the risk of skin cancer incidences.

The male sunscreen market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 5.1% between 2016 and 2024.

Highlighting the anticipated 5.1% CAGR growth within the male sunscreen market from 2016 to 2024 offers intriguing insights in a blog post regarding sunscreen statistics. These projected figures not only underline a rising awareness and proactive stance among men towards skin health and sun protection, but they also indicate a shifting dynamic within the global sunscreen market. As interest and demand within this niche category accelerate, manufacturers and brands can leverage this data to drive product development and innovation, creating sunscreen solutions that appeal directly to male users. This growth forecast, therefore, encapsulates both a signpost of changing consumer attitudes and a guide for the industry’s strategic decisions.

Conclusion

The sunscreen industry data paints a vivid picture of our society’s growing awareness towards skin health and sun protection. Eagerness for safer, eco-friendly options combined with increased rates of skin cancer globally, have triggered a surge in the industry. Ultimately, these sunscreen statistics emphasize the vital role sun-protection products play in our daily lives, the evolving consumer preferences, and project a promising growth trajectory for the sector in the coming years.

References

0. – https://www.www.nhs.uk

1. – https://www.cancercontrol.cancer.gov

2. – https://www.link.springer.com

3. – https://www.jamanetwork.com

4. – https://www.www.grandviewresearch.com

5. – https://www.www.aad.org

6. – https://www.www.npd.com

7. – https://www.www.melanoma.org.au

8. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

9. – https://www.www.persistencemarketresearch.com

10. – https://www.www.skincancerprevention.org

FAQs

What does the SPF number on sunscreens mean?

SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor. The SPF number indicates how much protection a sunscreen offers against UVB rays. For example, if your skin normally burns after 10 minutes in the sun, an SPF 15 sunscreen would theoretically provide 15 times that, or 150 minutes of protection without sunburn.

How often should one apply sunscreen?

According to dermatological guidelines, sunscreen should be applied at least every 2 hours, and immediately after swimming or excessive sweating. It's important to remember that no sunscreen can provide 100% protection and therefore additional protective measures like wearing a hat or staying in the shade should be considered.

Does the sunscreen work immediately after application?

Chemical sunscreens require about 20-30 minutes to fully bind to the skin, hence, they should be applied half an hour before going out. On the other hand, physical sunscreens work as soon as they're applied because they sit on the skin surface and reflect away the UV rays.

Can I use the same sunscreen for my face and body?

While there's no rule against using the same sunscreen for your face and body, many people prefer using different ones. Facial sunscreens often contain ingredients that target specific skin issues like aging or acne, and they are designed to feel lighter and less greasy on the skin.

Do I need to wear sunscreen on cloudy days?

Yes, it's recommended to wear sunscreen even on cloudy days. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, up to 80% of the sun’s UV rays can pass through clouds, which can lead to skin damage and increased risk of skin cancer.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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