GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Shopping Malls Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Shopping Malls Statistics

  • The total gross leasable area of shopping malls in the USA is over 6.8 billion square feet.
  • As of 2019, there were approximately 116,000 shopping malls in the United States.
  • In 2017, Asia Pacific had the largest mall in the world with a gross leasable area of 21 million square feet.
  • In the U.S., 78.7% of adults visited a shopping mall at least once in the last 12 months, as per 2016 statistics.
  • 72% of millennial shop in both online and physical stores.
  • As of 2019, Dubai Mall was the most visited shopping mall, with approximately 84 million visitors.
  • There were 1264 malls in the USA that had a parking space of at least 25 acres in 2020.
  • Retail sales per square foot in U.S. malls was $325 as per 2014 statistics.
  • In 2017, over 8000 stores were closed by retailers in the U.S., affecting malls.
  • In 2021, the annual revenue by traditional strip malls in the USA is projected to be $13 billion.
  • It is estimated that by 2022, around 25% of U.S shopping malls will be closed.
  • From 2010 to 2019, the number of shopping malls in the U.S. decreased by 8.2%.
  • There are more than 12,000 major shopping centers in Europe as of 2019.
  • 60% of Americans prefer online shopping over mall shopping in 2020 due to COVID.
  • On average, people living in the Middle East spend 7 hours a week shopping in malls.
  • Major shopping centers in China had a monthly footfall of approximately 250,000 in 2020.
  • The average visit duration to major shopping malls in China in 2020 was approximately 80 minutes.
  • About 115 million Americans visited a mall each month in 2019.
  • By 2025, it is projected that 45% of U.S. departmental stores in malls will be extinct.

Table of Contents

The fascinating world of shopping malls is not just about luxury and convenience, it also offers deep and insightful statistical data. Understanding shopping mall statistics can reveal significant trends and patterns about consumer behavior, spending habits, and retail economics. As we embark on this analytical journey, we delve into various data elements such as foot traffic, retail sales, and leasing rates among other factors. This information not only provides a snapshot of the present retail landscape but also gives a forecast of the future, playing a crucial role for both retailers and consumers alike.

The Latest Shopping Malls Statistics Unveiled

The total gross leasable area of shopping malls in the USA is over 6.8 billion square feet.

The staggering figure of over 6.8 billion square feet of leasable area in U.S. shopping malls serves as a testament to the enduring American consumer culture. This value signifies not just the extraordinary scope of bountiful retail spaces available, but also paints a picture of the vast, bustling complexes that influence local economies, employment opportunities, and consumer trends. Furthermore, it’s a reflection of consumer demand and real estate development trends. Therefore, in the landscape of a blog post centered around Shopping Mall Statistics, such a statistic gives readers a tangible sense of the sheer magnitude and significance of shopping malls within the wider ecosystem of American commerce.

As of 2019, there were approximately 116,000 shopping malls in the United States.

Painting a comprehensive picture of the magnitude of American consumer culture, the statistic that there were approximately 116,000 shopping malls in the United States as of 2019 quintessentially stands out. In a blog post about Shopping Malls Statistics, this striking number not only underscores the sheer prevalence and commercial mammoth that these retail complexes represent, but also provides invaluable insights into consumer behavior, economic health, real estate dynamics, among other factors. Consequently, such data can be a pivotal compass for stakeholders – from industry analysts and urban planners, to marketers and small businesses – in understanding the market, formulating strategic decisions, or even predicting future trends. This statistic, hence, embodies a telling narrative of the deep-seated and vast landscape of shopping malls in the United States.

In 2017, Asia Pacific had the largest mall in the world with a gross leasable area of 21 million square feet.

Highlighting that in 2017, Asia Pacific was home to the world’s largest mall, possessing a gross leasable area of 21 million square feet lends valuable insight to the immense scale and growth of the retail sector in that region. This monumental size underscores the significant role shopping malls play in the socio-economic landscape of the Asia Pacific, indicating strong consumer spending power and developed retail market. It likewise provides a clear depiction of the potential opportunities available for retailers and investors in this area, as well as implications for mall developers when plotting their global expansion strategy. Therefore, this solitary statistic forms a captivating narrative of both regional and global retail trends.

In the U.S., 78.7% of adults visited a shopping mall at least once in the last 12 months, as per 2016 statistics.

Navigating through the heart of a vibrant shopping mall paints an intriguing picture for any statistician looking to unravel consumer habits. As noted by the pulse of 2016 statistics, an impressive 78.7% of U.S adults were swept into this retail playground at least once within a year. This figure serves as a powerful testament to the intrinsic role malls play in American consumer culture, thus providing a foundation for dissecting and understanding the intricacies of buying behavior, frequency of visits, spending patterns, and even the influence of mall amenities and location on consumer choice. Within the vast landscape of Shopping Malls Statistics, this key data point initiates a valuable conversation on the enduring magnetism of physical retail spaces amidst the growing tide of e-commerce.

72% of millennial shop in both online and physical stores.

Delving into newer shopping trends, we unearth that an impressive 72% of millennials revel in the diverse shopping landscape by engaging in both online and physical store shopping. This intriguing statistic acts as a marrow for business strategies as it extrapolates an understanding that despite the burgeoning popularity of e-commerce, millennials still perceive value in brick-and-mortar shopping experiences. It further emphasizes that shopping malls continue to hold a preferential position amongst millennials and could potentially boost their relevance by integrating these two platforms in their retail strategy. Therefore, survival in today’s retail landscape necessitates a blend of digital and tangible shopping avenues—an insight absolutely pivotal in tailoring contemporary shopping mall statistics or planning future business development.

As of 2019, Dubai Mall was the most visited shopping mall, with approximately 84 million visitors.

Unveiling an impressive figure, Dubai Mall claimed the crown as the most visited shopping mall in 2019, drawing around 84 million visitors that year. The magnetism of this mall offers an intriguing insight into modern consumer behavior, demonstrating both the continued relevance of physical shopping venues and the allure of combining retail with leisure activities. Furthermore, it points towards the scale of opportunity for retail businesses in high footfall areas and opens a portal to understand trends in global retail consumption, which blends cultural experience with commerce. In short, this statistic is a trendsetter, setting the tone for the future discourse in the realm of shopping mall statistics.

There were 1264 malls in the USA that had a parking space of at least 25 acres in 2020.

The compelling sphere of shopping mall statistics becomes even more interesting when we consider the impressive figure that there were 1264 malls in the USA with a parking space of at least 25 acres in 2020. This not only underscores the scale and grandeur of these retail complexes, but also reveals important insights about American consumer culture, urban planning, and their interplay. On one hand, it signifies the vast geographical spread of malls, catering to America’s shopping and leisure preferences. On the other, it points towards how urban spaces are utilized and allocated, highlighting the significance of large-scale parking facilities in accommodating the needs of suburban shoppers who prefer traveling by personal vehicles. In essence, this statistic unfolds a fascinating story about consumer behavior, retail infrastructure, the growing scale of malls and sustainability concerns in contemporary America.

Retail sales per square foot in U.S. malls was $325 as per 2014 statistics.

Understanding the figure of $325 as the retail sales per square foot in U.S malls, based on 2014 data, offers valuable insight into consumer behaviors and retail performance. It speaks volumes on the demand dynamics within mall spaces, reflecting an appetite for diverse shopping experiences beyond ecommerce. For mall operators and retail tenants, it’s a crucial indicator of potential profitability, helping them strategize on efficient use of space, product placement, and pricing. Meanwhile, investors and economists can decipher macroeconomic indicators like purchasing power and consumer confidence from this stat. Hence, in the realm of a blog post about shopping mall statistics, it plays a pivotal role in unraveling layered narratives about the health, vibrancy and business potential of physical retail spaces.

In 2017, over 8000 stores were closed by retailers in the U.S., affecting malls.

Highlighting the large-scale closure of over 8000 retail stores in America in 2017 paints a vivid picture of a seismic shift in the shopping landscape, particularly for malls. This crucial fact underscores the pressures traditional brick-and-mortar stores, and by extension shopping malls, are facing amid changing consumer habits and the explosive growth of e-commerce. Thus, for a reader engrossed in a blog about Shopping Mall Statistics, it provides a comprehensive and multi-dimensional understanding of not just the current status, but also potential future trends in the domain of mall-based retail.

In 2021, the annual revenue by traditional strip malls in the USA is projected to be $13 billion.

The projected $13 billion in annual revenue generated by traditional strip malls in the USA for 2021 isn’t just a figure – it’s a narrative with implications. This statistic provides a quantifiable measure of the vitality of the traditional brick-and-mortar retail sector within the shopping center industry. Despite the ongoing rise of e-commerce, the continuing strength of strip malls underscores their fundamental role in American retail, signifying their resilience, relevance, and potential growth. Thus, in a blog post about Shopping Malls Statistics, it paints a telling picture, suggesting how trends evolve and endowing readers with a more profound understanding of the mall industry’s evolving landscape.

It is estimated that by 2022, around 25% of U.S shopping malls will be closed.

Peering into the crystal ball of retail trends, an alarming forecast surfaces; by 2022, a staggering estimate predicts the closure of roughly a quarter of U.S. shopping malls. Accentuating the gravity of this statistic within a post on Shopping Mall Statistics, it depicts the burgeoning shift in consumer behavior and the colossal influence of e-commerce on traditional brick-and-mortar establishments. This tapestry of numbers tells a sobering tale of dwindling foot traffic, evolving shopping habits, and the urgent need for physical retailers to adapt or face potential extinction. The survival of shopping malls may hinge on innovative transformations to meet modern consumer demands.

From 2010 to 2019, the number of shopping malls in the U.S. decreased by 8.2%.

Illuminating the evolving landscape of retail culture, the 8.2% decrease in U.S. shopping malls from 2010 to 2019 underscores a paradigm shift within this sector. As a keystone in the narrative around shopping mall statistics, this marked reduction paints a picture of changing consumer behaviors, increased online competition, and evolving real estate strategies. This empirical evidence compels readers to understand the advent of new retail models, the repurposing of traditional retail spaces, and the escalating rivalry between physical and digital storefronts. Thus, this statistic is not just a number, but a lens through which we witness the mutation and resilience of the retail industry.

There are more than 12,000 major shopping centers in Europe as of 2019.

Unveiling the phenomenal count of over 12,000 major shopping centers gracing Europe as of 2019 allows us to grasp the true magnitude of the continent’s retail panorama. This highlight plays the role of a robust pillar in a blog post about Shopping Malls Statistics, giving readers comparative insights into the spread and acceptability of mall culture on different continents. Furthermore, it helps quantify the extensive opportunities for businesses eyeing Europe’s retail industry, giving emerging brands a glimpse into potential market sizes and investor confidence in the sector. Tabulating this number also sets a benchmark for tracking future growth or contraction trends in the industry, fostering intuitive understandings of the dynamics shaping Europe’s shopping alleyways.

60% of Americans prefer online shopping over mall shopping in 2020 due to COVID.

Witnessing an epochal shift in consumption trends, the statistic representing a staggering 60% of Americans showing preference for online shopping over mall shopping in 2020, predominantly triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, becomes a central narrative in our discussion on Shopping Malls Statistics. It graphically illustrates the unprecedented paradigm shift in the retail landscape, consequently posing formidable challenges and demanding innovative adaptations for the traditional brick-and-mortar mall industry. Notably, this hemorrhaging trend towards e-commerce serves to underline the importance of malls reinventing their consumer engagement strategies to stay relevant in an increasingly digital and pandemic-stricken world.

On average, people living in the Middle East spend 7 hours a week shopping in malls.

In the vibrant narrative of Shopping Malls Statistics, the statistic that residents of the Middle East devote, on average, a hefty 7 hours a week shopping in malls weaves a significant thread. This figure not only displays the importance of the mall as a central hub for commerce in the region, but it also showcases the social and cultural significance that these elaborate structures hold. This piece of data is a testament to the shopping malls’ potential in drawing consumers, facilitating the spread of trends and fashion, and underpinning a substantial part of consumer-driven economies in the Middle East. It sets the stage for examining numerous dimensions of shopping behaviors, customer preferences, and the central role of malls in modern Middle Eastern society.

Major shopping centers in China had a monthly footfall of approximately 250,000 in 2020.

Unearthing the profundity of the figure ‘Major shopping centers in China encountered a monthly foot traffic of 250,000 in 2020,’ adds an intriguing layer to the narrative of the blog post about Shopping Malls Statistics. In the pulsating arena of retail trends, it depicts a potent testament of the unyielding consumer interest and purchasing power prevalent in China, which survived even amid a global pandemic. Reflecting a macroscopic view of China’s retail ecosystem, this figure is a pivotal benchmark, enhancing insights into footfall patterns, consumer behavior, and market dynamics that can fuel further strategic decisions, ranging from business expansion to targeted marketing plans.

The average visit duration to major shopping malls in China in 2020 was approximately 80 minutes.

Delving into the minutiae of visitor behaviors, the riveting statistic divulges that the average time netizens lavished in major Chinese shopping emporiums throughout 2020 was just shy of one hour and twenty minutes. That’s effectively a mini Hollywood blockbuster. This insight is a key puzzle piece when assembling an accurate picture of shopper engagement and habits in contemporary mall culture, and an intriguing harbinger of potential space utilization and sales strategy refinement. Able to beckon and retain customers for significantly lengthy periods, these monumental marketplaces appear to be imprinted backdrops to people’s retail rituals, a dynamic that can be capitalized on by brands and commercial institutions to leverage their presence and optimize revenues. Thus, our statistical spotlight sheds a telling light on the value of finely-tuned time pattern analysis in the retail industry.

About 115 million Americans visited a mall each month in 2019.

Unveiling a critical facet of consumer behavior, the fact that around 115 million Americans frequented a mall each month in 2019, sheds light on the undeniable sway of the brick-and-mortar retail arena, despite the steep incline in e-commerce. This compelling statistic reinstates the sustained allure of in-person shopping experiences for a significant portion of the population, substantiating the need for the strategic existence and continual development of physical malls. In the discourse around changing consumer preferences, this data points toward the dual necessity of online presence and gratifying in-store experience, affirming that malls remain crucial and thriving entities within the US retail landscape.

By 2025, it is projected that 45% of U.S. departmental stores in malls will be extinct.

In a blog post focused on Shopping Malls Statistics, understanding the possible trajectory of store closures is critical. The statistic that by 2025, an anticipated 45% of U.S. department stores within malls might become extinct presents vital information about the changing landscape of retail and consumer behavior. This highlights evolving trends in the way people are choosing to shop and the potential decline of traditional brick-and-mortar stores, profoundly reshaping the future of malls. As we appreciate these numbers, we can’t help but ponder the adaptations and transformations malls will need to undergo not to become modern-day dinosaurs.

Conclusion

Shopping malls represent a significant cross-section of contemporary economics, shaping consumer behavior and trends. The decline in footfalls combined with the rise in online shopping illuminates the evolving shopping environment, necessitating a rebirth and reimagining of traditional mall spaces. As we delve deeper into this digital era, data suggests an emphasis on malls being more than just a shopping destination, but a blend of retail, entertainment, food, and service industries. Smart applications of statistical data and consumer preferences may lead these mall spaces to their next evolutionary leap, ensuring their survival and continued relevance.

References

0. – https://www.www.worldatlas.com

1. – https://www.www.ibisworld.com

2. – https://www.www.cnbc.com

3. – https://www.www.businessinsider.com

4. – https://www.www.emarketer.com

5. – https://www.www.coresight.com

6. – https://www.www.pymnts.com

7. – https://www.www.statista.com

8. – https://www.www.bigcommerce.com

FAQs

What is the average number of people visiting shopping malls each day?

This can significantly vary depending on the location and size of the mall. However, an average mid-sized shopping mall can expect around 20,000 to 25,000 visitors per day.

How has the popularity of shopping malls changed over the past decade?

The popularity of shopping malls has seen a decline over the past decade, primarily due to the rise of e-commerce. However, many malls are shifting their focus to provide more experiential offerings to attract consumers.

Which age group frequents shopping malls the most?

The age group that most frequently visits shopping malls is typically adolescents and young adults (ages 15-24). However, the demographics can vary based on the region and specific stores found in the mall.

What are the busiest days for shopping malls?

As per retail traffic patterns, weekends, particularly Saturdays, tend to be the busiest days for shopping malls. Holiday periods also witness a significant increase in foot traffic.

What is the average amount of money spent by a customer in one shopping mall visit?

This would largely depend on the types of stores in the mall and the socio-economic status of the surrounding area. However, on an average, a shopper might spend anywhere between $50 and $100 in a single mall visit.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents