GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics

  • Approximately 63% of young adults, 60% of middle-aged adults, and 70% of older adults consume soft drinks daily in the U.S.
  • About half (49.8%) of adults in the United States reported consuming at least one sugar-sweetened beverage per day (between 2011-2014).
  • In 2019, annual per capita consumption of soft drinks in the U.S. was about 38.87 gallons.
  • U.S. adults consume an average of 145 calories from SSBs (Sugar-Sweetened Beverages) per day.
  • More than 60% of children and adolescents in the U.S. report daily consumption of SSBs.
  • Global soft drink market was valued at $253.8 billion in 2019 and expected to reach $257.4 billion by 2020.
  • The worldwide consumption of soft drinks reached nearly 89.17 billion liters in 2018.
  • Australia has the second highest consumption of soft drinks, with an annual per capita consumption of 93 liters in 2017.
  • As of 2015, Latin America had the highest per capita consumption of soft drinks worldwide at 94.1 liters.
  • In 2020, carbonated soft drinks led the U.S. market, recording sales of approximately $35.5 billion.
  • Peru is reported to have the highest per capita consumption of carbonated drinks in the world.
  • The average price for a two-liter bottle of Pepsi in the U.S. in 2020 was $1.89.
  • In 2019, Coca-Cola maintained a hefty lead in the U.S. cola market, with 43.7% market share.
  • Mexico has the highest soft drink consumption per capita with nearly 745 8-ounce servings per person per year.
  • More than 20% of UK's sugar intake comes from soft drinks.
  • The high school student population is the largest consumers of soft drinks in the U.S., with an average consumption of 1.7 cans per day.
  • Carbonated soft drinks hold a 42.5% market share of the total U.S. beverage market.
  • The global carbonated soft drink market size was worth USD 406.6 Billion in 2019.
  • Roughly 3 out of 10 American adults (30.1%) drink a sugar-sweetened beverage every day.
  • Children and youth in the US averaged 143 calories per day from SSBs, which makes up 7.3% of their daily calorie intake.

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Understanding consumption patterns of soft drinks can offer valuable insights into the changing landscapes of health, lifestyle, and business trends globally. In this blog post, we dive deep into the world of Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics. We will tackle figures depicting consumption rates across different regions, demographic groups, and time periods. This data will not only help quantify public health implications but also shed light on market opportunities and consumer behavior trends in the fizzy world of soft drinks.

The Latest Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics Unveiled

Approximately 63% of young adults, 60% of middle-aged adults, and 70% of older adults consume soft drinks daily in the U.S.

Diving into the heart of soft drink consumption in the U.S, we encounter the gripping statistic that roughly 63% of young adults, 60% of middle-aged adults, and a whopping 70% of older adults indulge in these sugary beverages daily. This not only illustrates the vastly pervasive influence of soft drinks across generational lines, but it also sheds light on the ubiquitous presence of these beverages in daily American life. The nuanced understanding of the age-specific consumption rates offers valuable insights for both industry and health experts. For the former, it highlights potential target demographics for marketing efforts while for the latter, it underscores the need for public health initiatives to reduce consumption and associated health risks. Thus, this statistic plays a pivotal role in shaping the core narrative of our blog post on soft drink consumption statistics.

About half (49.8%) of adults in the United States reported consuming at least one sugar-sweetened beverage per day (between 2011-2014).

Delving into the sweep of soft drinks consumption, a glaring truth surfaces from the volumes of American dietary habits. As the curtain lifts, the narrative unfolds with a striking statistic – an alarming 49.8% of adults in the United States confessed to gulping down at least one sugar-sweetened beverage every day between 2011-2014. This figure isn’t just a percentage, but a mirror reflecting a nation’s propensity towards sweet indulgence, and offers critical insight for anyone seeking to understand, and potentially reshape, consumption habits. In a blog post about Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics, this figure serves as a cornerstone, forming the basis for a deep and rich discussion around the role that these sugar-sweetened drinks play in the American diet and the broader implications for public health.

In 2019, annual per capita consumption of soft drinks in the U.S. was about 38.87 gallons.

Shining a spotlight on the intriguing fact that in 2019, the annual per capita consumption of soft drinks in the U.S. averaged at around 38.87 gallons, provides not just an arresting snapshot of American consumer habits, but also serves as a potentially alarming testament to the ubiquity of sugary beverages in daily dietary routines. This figure, swept into the larger narrative of a blog post about Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics, steps up as a powerful device to incite dialogue on health repercussions, industry dominance, and societal trends, making it a cornerstone statistic within the narrative weave.

U.S. adults consume an average of 145 calories from SSBs (Sugar-Sweetened Beverages) per day.

A peek into the magnitude of Soft Drinks Consumption in America unveils an average consumption of 145 calories from Sugar-Sweetened Beverages (SSBs) by adults per day. This striking figure does more than just provide a numerical fact. It underscores the role SSBs play in the daily calorific intake of an average American, thereby illustrating the potential implications this might have on health conditions like obesity and diabetes which are often linked with high sugar consumption. By exposing the scale at which SSBs are consumed, this statistic enables us to better gauge the urgency and importance of efforts towards encouraging healthier beverage choices.

More than 60% of children and adolescents in the U.S. report daily consumption of SSBs.

Highlighting that over 60% of American children and adolescents report daily consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages (SSBs) launches a critical discussion within the blog post about Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics. It paints a vivid picture of the deeply rooted culture of soft drink consumption amongst young people, hinting at an engrained behavioral pattern that might persist into adulthood. In a society grappling with health issues such as obesity and diabetes, this statistic rings several alarm bells, calling for urgent intervention strategies. Moreover, it fuels the discourse surrounding commercial influences on dietary choices, nutrition education, and the importance of a balanced, healthy diet in the early years.

Global soft drink market was valued at $253.8 billion in 2019 and expected to reach $257.4 billion by 2020.

The vibrant indicator of the global soft drink market’s financial leap, from a staggering $253.8 billion in 2019 to an anticipated $257.4 billion by 2020, imbues the narrative with a tangible proof of the industry’s vigorous momentum. This crescendo in soft drink market value is a compelling testament to the evolving patterns and escalating rates of soft drink consumption among global populace. It quantifies and underscores the significance of the soft drink industry’s economic throughput, and paints a vivid picture of the pivotal role that consumer behaviour holds in shaping global economic landscape, thereby making it a pivotal talking point in our blog post about Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics.

The worldwide consumption of soft drinks reached nearly 89.17 billion liters in 2018.

Unveiling the mammoth scale of soft drinks consumption globally, the 2018 data reveals a staggering figure of 89.17 billion liters of intake. The sheer volume, comparable to a sea in itself, accentuates the deep-seated influence of soft drinks in our society, reflecting not just individual preferences but also larger trends in food and beverage industries. In the context of a blog post canvassing Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics, such data serves as a powerful launchpad, fostering in-depth dialogues about market growth, changing consumption patterns, health implications, or the environmental impact of soft drink production. This single statistic has the potential to quench the reader’s thirst for knowledge, offering fresh insights and sparking thought-provoking discussions in the realm of soft drinks.

Australia has the second highest consumption of soft drinks, with an annual per capita consumption of 93 liters in 2017.

Highlighting Australia’s mammoth annual per capita consumption of soft drinks, a staggering 93 liters in 2017, furnishes this blog post with an exceptional reflection of the global soft drinks industry’s prodigious scale. This nugget of statistical data, placing Australia second on the list, marks the significant reach of the soft drinks market in developed countries, highlighting potential areas of intensive marketing strategies. Furthermore, it underscores the pressing need for health awareness campaigns concerning potential adverse effects of high soft drink consumption, a topic worth considering in the scope of our analysis of global soft drink consumption habits.

As of 2015, Latin America had the highest per capita consumption of soft drinks worldwide at 94.1 liters.

Highlighting the spike of per capita soft drink consumption in Latin America at 94.1 liters as of 2015 introduces a striking example of soft drink prevalence in global comparison. This figure underscores Latin America as a significant hub of soft drink guzzling, providing a vivid illustration of regional consumption habits. In the landscape of a blog post about soft drink consumption, it presents the stark reality of worldwide soda indulgence, drawing fascinating insights into cultural, dietary and lifestyle trends while adding richness to the global narrative on soft drink consumption patterns.

In 2020, carbonated soft drinks led the U.S. market, recording sales of approximately $35.5 billion.

The spotlight falls on an arresting revelation: In 2020, carbonated soft drinks were unchallenged champions of the U.S. market with a formidable profit statement of approximately $35.5 billion. Contrasting this figure against the backdrop of an unfolding narrative on Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics offers a potent illustration of consumer preferences and spending behaviors. As such, it sculpturally defines the trends and commercial tides in the beverage industry, showing that fizzy drinks were, unequivocally, a market supernova in the year under scrutiny. It brings into sharp focus the industry’s size, the consumer’s habitual lean, and serves an anchoring reference for similar discussions and market analyses in the broader context.

Peru is reported to have the highest per capita consumption of carbonated drinks in the world.

Highlighting Peru’s dominance in global carbonated drink consumption adds a fascinating dimension to a blog about Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics. It engenders discussions about cultural, economic and social factors influencing consumption patterns. Especially striking is the exploration of corporate marketing strategies, income distributions, and lifestyle choices that could contribute to this remarkably high consumption rate. Furthermore, it prompts a thorough examination on potential health implications, inspiring dialogue on nutritional education, policy reforms and industry responsibility. Thus, embedding Peru’s distinctive carbonated drinks consumption statistic lends a deeper understanding, garnishing the blog with diverse, critical perspectives and stimulating debates.

The average price for a two-liter bottle of Pepsi in the U.S. in 2020 was $1.89.

In scrutinizing soft drinks consumption patterns, the ‘average price for a two-liter bottle of Pepsi in the U.S. in 2020 being $1.89’ presents an economical gauge of the overall market trends and purchasing power. This critical price point can both influence and reflect the consumption volume and frequency, as it can serve as a determining factor for consumers when choosing between brands or opting for healthier alternatives. Moreover, it fuels insight about the Pepsi’s market positioning, its competitive landscape, and the implications of certain macroeconomic factors such as inflation and income levels. This statistic, therefore, becomes a relevant cornerstone in unravelling the dynamic intricacies of soft drinks consumption rates and trends.

In 2019, Coca-Cola maintained a hefty lead in the U.S. cola market, with 43.7% market share.

The U.S. cola market picture of 2019, revealing Coca-Cola’s dominance with a commanding 43.7% market share, serves as an impactful slice of the larger narrative about soft drinks consumption, in our blog. This figure resonates with the focus of our discussion, as it highlights the formidable stronghold that major brands like Coca-Cola continue to enjoy within the beverage sector. It’s intriguing to note how these big players shape trends, consumer choices, and eventually, the dynamic market landscape itself, fruitfully informing our conversation around soft drinks consumption and its far-reaching impacts.

Mexico has the highest soft drink consumption per capita with nearly 745 8-ounce servings per person per year.

Spotlighting Mexico’s soaring rank in soft drinks consumption unveils the towering stature of its consumption habits, illustrating vividly the permeation of the beverage industry in the country. The startling figure of nearly 745 8-ounce servings per person annually not only breaches global averages, but it also triggers compelling conversations around health implications, market trends, and societal preferences toward soft drinks. Consequently, it adds depth and intrigue to the blog post, creating a potent reference point that underlines the wider patterns and disparities in global soft drinks consumption. This dynamic interplay between culture, consumption, and commercial interests that the statistic reflects renders it invaluable for the discussion on Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics.

More than 20% of UK’s sugar intake comes from soft drinks.

Dwelling on the stunning fact that over a fifth of the sugar intake in the UK emanates from soft drinks brings to light the critical role these beverages play in shaping dietary habits. This data not only spotlights our collective sweet tooth but also underscores the significant potential soft drinks hold in influencing the nation’s health – be it through contributing to calorie intake, obesity, or dental problems. Thus, when understanding the landscape of soft drinks consumption, it becomes imperative not only to grasp their popularity but also their far-reaching impacts on nutritional intake and public health.

The high school student population is the largest consumers of soft drinks in the U.S., with an average consumption of 1.7 cans per day.

Highlighting that high school students form the largest demographic indulging in soft drinks in the U.S. and average 1.7 cans daily adds an intriguing facet to our look at Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics. This pivotal piece of information not only underscores the popularity of soft drinks amongst the young generation, but it also paints an informative picture of consumption habits that will likely determine future trends and marketing strategies within the industry. Furthermore, this alarming statistic may also steer public health discussions, considering the potential health effects of high sugary drink intake among our youth.

Carbonated soft drinks hold a 42.5% market share of the total U.S. beverage market.

Understanding that carbonated soft drinks command a 42.5% market share of the total U.S. beverage market offers valuable insight into the prevailing consumption trends in the country. This proportion not only indicates that almost half of the beverages consumed in the U.S. are carbonated, but it also showcases the dominance of these sparkling refreshments in the beverage industry. This critical knowledge underlines the enormous popularity and societal influence of carbonated beverages, outlining the depth of the nation’s love for fizzy drinks. This fact presents a gateway into further discussions on changing consumption habits, health implications, and marketing strategies within the blog post.

The global carbonated soft drink market size was worth USD 406.6 Billion in 2019.

The meteoric valuation of the global carbonated soft drink market at a staggering USD 406.6 Billion in 2019 sets a context on the sheer power and reach of bubbly beverages in our global palate. Serving as a quantifiable testament to carbonated soft drinks’ ubiquity and popularity, it paints a vivid picture of their cultural significance, economic impact, and potential effects on health trends. Moreover, having a grasp of this sizeable market figure provides invaluable insights for understanding consumer behavior, business strategies and forecasting future trends in the beverage industry for stakeholders ranging from health advocates to business entities.

Roughly 3 out of 10 American adults (30.1%) drink a sugar-sweetened beverage every day.

Highlighting that nearly one-third of American adults indulge in sugar-sweetened beverages daily underscores the deep-rooted culture of soft drink consumption in the U.S. This pervasive statistic serves as a compelling gateway into evaluating trends, behaviors, and implications associated with sweetened beverage intake. With its numeral value, it punctuates the dialogue around health and lifestyle choices, the impact of marketing strategies of soft drink companies, and potential policy interventions. Indeed, understanding this figure is essential to grain a nuanced understanding of both individual choices and collective consumption patterns within the broader narrative of soft drinks consumption statistics.

Children and youth in the US averaged 143 calories per day from SSBs, which makes up 7.3% of their daily calorie intake.

Highlighting the very fact that on average, children and youth in the US intake 143 calories per day solely from sugar-sweetened beverages, which comes up to 7.3% of their daily calorie needs, ambiguously illuminates a significant pattern in the overall dietary inclination. This speaks volumes in a blog post addressing soft drinks consumption as it accentuates the potential consequences tied to frequent soft drinks intake. It also raises critical questions concerning general health, obesity trends, and lifestyle choices commonly imprinted in our society, especially among the younger generation. Thus the choice of soft drinks as a substantial calorie provider underpins a major shift steering dietary practices, necessitating a broader understanding and a call to action.

Conclusion

Our study on Soft Drinks Consumption Statistics revealed some compelling findings. The consumption rate indicates a substantial inclination towards soft drinks among certain demographics, particularly among adolescents. However, an increasing awareness of health implications related to high sugar content is encouraging a shift in consumption patterns. The data suggests that even though soft drink companies are still recording substantial revenue, they need to pay attention to the growing health-conscious demographic by possibly diversifying into healthier beverage alternatives.

References

0. – https://www.www.worldatlas.com

1. – https://www.www.oberlo.com

2. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

3. – https://www.www.statista.com

4. – https://www.www.beveragedaily.com

5. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

6. – https://www.www.grandviewresearch.com

FAQs

What is the average soft drink consumption per capita across different regions?

The answer varies by region. For instance, as of 2017, Mexico has been reported to have the highest per capita consummation - 137.5 liters per person per year. The United States is a close second with an average of 126.7 liters per person per year.

What is the correlation between soft drink consumption and obesity?

Many studies have found a strong correlation between increased soda consumption and a higher risk of obesity. However, correlation does not directly imply causation - other factors such as diet and exercise also play significant roles.

How have the sales of sugary soft drinks changed in recent years?

There has been a noticeable decline in the sale of sugary soft drinks over recent years as consumers continue to opt for healthier beverage choices. However, the rate of decline varies depending on specific jurisdictions and their public health regulations.

Are diet soft drinks consumption rates increasing?

Though diet soft drinks are marketed as a healthier alternative, their consumption rates are not necessarily increasing across the board. Some people interpret the mixed research on the health effects of artificial sweeteners to mean that they should be avoided.

Which age group consumes the most amount of soft drinks?

While the specific numbers may vary, research generally shows that younger demographic groups (typically, teenagers and young adults) tend to consume more soft drinks compared to older age groups.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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