GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics

  • Men spend more on impulse buys than women, with the average man spending $196 per month compare to the average woman's $152.
  • 78% of women love shopping while only 52% of men do.
  • Women are leading in online shopping, constituting 72% of the online shoppers.
  • More than 70% of women consider shopping a form of entertainment, compared to just over 50% of men.
  • Around 60% of men, aged 18-34, say they shop more on their smartphones than they do in stores.
  • Women tend to be more price conscious than men, with 64% at all times compared to 59% of men.
  • Roughly 40% of men make a purchase via their mobile phone compared to 33% of women.
  • 14% of women look at products online almost every day, compared to 8% of men.
  • Women are more likely than men to look for deals and discounts before making a purchase, 58% vs. 54%.
  • Men are more inclined to pay higher prices for convenience, with 40% saying they would do so compared to 33% of women.
  • Men are more likely than women to make purchases through voice-activated devices, 22% vs. 16%.
  • 51% of U.S. men prefer to buy online while 49% prefer to buy in a physical store.
  • 65% of men said they shopped online to save time, while only 55% of women gave the same reason.
  • 26% of men said they shop online at work, compared with 15% of women.
  • 47% of female consumers say that a personalized offer from a brand can highly influence what they purchase vs. 35% for males.
  • Nearly 40% of women have made a purchase on their smartphones while visiting a brick-and-mortar store.
  • 50% of females make a shopping list before going out to shop, as compared to 36% of males.
  • In 2019, 22% of men made a purchase on the internet daily or almost daily compared with 18% of women.
  • Men are more likely than women to make purchases on mobile apps, with 68% saying they've made at least one in the past month, compared to 56% of women.

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In the fascinating world of consumer behavior, gender-based purchasing patterns have always been a pivotal topic of discussion. Evaluating the differences between male and female shopping statistics not only provides valuable insights for market analysts, but it also refines the strategies of businesses requiring a deep understanding of their customer base. This blog post will delve into revealing the divergent shopping patterns between the genders, highlighting various elements including frequency of shopping, spending habits, online versus in-store preferences, and the influence of advertisements. By comprehending these shopping habits, marketers could cater to their target demographic more efficiently, providing personalized offerings that better meet customer needs.

The Latest Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics Unveiled

Men spend more on impulse buys than women, with the average man spending $196 per month compare to the average woman’s $152.

Highlighting the intriguing male versus female shopping dynamics, it’s fascinating to affirm that the average man outpaces his female counterparts when it comes to splurging on impulse buys by a cool $44 monthly margin. This significant monetary difference not only shreds the stereotype of women being the more impulsive shoppers, but it also offers insight to marketers and retailers to devise gender-specific strategies that cater to these distinct shopping behaviors, thereby increasing potential sales and customer engagement. It serves as invaluable fodder for an engaging and enlightening blog post on sex-based shopping statistics, giving readers a broader perspective and reshaping conventional beliefs about consumer spending patterns.

78% of women love shopping while only 52% of men do.

In the thrilling saga of Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics, the revelation that a whopping 78% of Women express love for shopping, against a relatively sober 52% representation from Men, delivers fascinating insights. This versatile nugget of data provides a canvas for interpretations and discussions, allowing for in-depth explorations into factors such as gender-based preferences, marketing strategy effectiveness and cultural influence on shopping habits. It invites businesses to reconsider their customer engagement strategies, beckons marketers to gear their campaigns towards more gender-specific needs and nudges sociologists to delve deeper into the behavioral patterns displayed by these statistics. Such intriguing revelations enable us to understand retail dynamics in greater depth, making it a significant addition to our blog post.

Women are leading in online shopping, constituting 72% of the online shoppers.

In the realm of digital commerce, as depicted by the gripping figure of 72% female dominance in online shopping, an undeniably noteworthy gender distinction crystallizes. This statistic not only underscores women’s significant role and influence in the e-commerce landscape, but also shapes the debate in a blog post about male vs female shopping statistics. This striking percentage is indicative of gender differences in shopping preferences and habits, potentially driving e-commerce businesses to reconsider their marketing strategies, user experience, and design elements to more effectively engage their predominant female demographic, thus, leveraging this influential statistic to optimize profitability.

More than 70% of women consider shopping a form of entertainment, compared to just over 50% of men.

Diving into the realm of retail psychology, we uncover an intriguing variation between the shopping behaviors of males and females. The statistic that over 70% of women find amusement in the art of shopping, contrasted with just barely half of men resonates with the fundamental differences in gendered shopping patterns. It highlights the notion that shopping, for many women, extends beyond a mere act of purchase, morphing into a form of enjoyment or even leisure. For men, on the flip side, shopping appears to be more dutiful and less of a diversion, presenting a relatively utilitarian approach. In a blog post elucidating Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics, this particular statistic can offer profound insights into creating differentiated marketing strategies, targeted promotions, and tailoring in-store or online experiences to cater to these contrasting perspectives.

Around 60% of men, aged 18-34, say they shop more on their smartphones than they do in stores.

Deriving insight from this statistic paints a vivid picture of the changing shopping habits among young men, significantly influencing the Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics conversation. It underscores that a significant 60% of men, aged 18-34, are more inclined towards online shopping through their smartphones versus traditional in-store shopping. This shift in consumer behavior is invaluable knowledge for retailers and market strategists embarking on creating targeted campaigns and fine-tuning sales strategies. The statistic also helps drive discussions around potential differences in online consumption patterns between genders, providing unique perspectives on consumer behavior dynamics in the digital era.

Women tend to be more price conscious than men, with 64% at all times compared to 59% of men.

In the bustling arena of Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics, the discernment that 64% of women are perpetually price conscious compared to 59% of men provides a rich and engaging edge. The subtle but significant divergence between male and female shopping behaviors becomes quite insightful, painting a vivid picture of gender-specific consumption habits. For businesses, this nugget of information can shape effective, gender-targeted marketing strategies, besides sparking intriguing discussions surrounding social, cultural, and biological influences on spending patterns.

Roughly 40% of men make a purchase via their mobile phone compared to 33% of women.

In the grand chessboard of Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics, the intriguing revelation that around 40% of men shop using their mobile devices – a notable 7% more than the women’s percentage – serves as an insightful strategy, subtly proclaiming the growing significance of designing user interfaces and experiences that cater to men’s preferences. This data arms online marketers with potential avenues to make a move, suiting their promotions, sales and even product inventory to align more effectively with this male-dominated digital shopping trend.

14% of women look at products online almost every day, compared to 8% of men.

Unearthing the gender dynamics in online shopping, the data that 14% of women scan products online almost daily, juxtaposed against the 8% of men, serves as an insightful revelation. Highlighted in a blog post about Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics, this statistic draws a portrait of women as more frequent digital window-shoppers. This hints at the potential for businesses to tap into and develop strategies aligned towards the more consistent female audience. Besides, it also prompts an examination of the factors that contribute to men’s relatively lesser engagement and opens a discussion on how to enhance their shopping experience.

Women are more likely than men to look for deals and discounts before making a purchase, 58% vs. 54%.

Delving into the dynamics of gender-based shopping behaviors, the statistic reveals a noteworthy trend; 58% of women seeking deals and discounts prior to any purchase compared to 54% of men. This subtly underlines the calculated and deal-driven approach of female shoppers. In a blog post unpacking the divergences between male and female shopping statistics, this fact serves to flesh out the intricacies of female spending patterns. In addition, it helps marketers and retailers structure their strategies, so they resonate more cogently with their female audience. This careful indulgence in cost-cutting demonstrates a more economic, value-conscious shopping habit among women, emphasizing the implications for consumer behavior research, retail tactics, and market segmentation.

Men are more inclined to pay higher prices for convenience, with 40% saying they would do so compared to 33% of women.

Peeling back layers of gender shopping behaviors, it’s fascinating to discover that convenience carries more weight for men, as 40% of them are willing to shell out more for it while only 33% of women express similar inclinations. This distinction offers a golden nugget of insight for businesses targeting men and women’s shopping tendencies, affording them the ability to tailor their services accordingly. In the lively Male vs Female Shopping Statistics tug-of-war, this metric candidly hints at a possible gender-based convenience-value bias, where men’s propensity towards convenience could be leveraged by businesses looking to maximize revenue.

Men are more likely than women to make purchases through voice-activated devices, 22% vs. 16%.

Delving into the fascinating realm of shopping behaviours, it is striking to unearth that men’s affinity for voice-activated devices outpaces women’s, with a contrast of 22% to 16%. This finding is not merely a number; it unveils insights into gender-based technological adaptabilities and preferences. As we dissect the shopping patterns inherent to both sexes in the context of a blog post on Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics, this data not only enhances the narrative, but also guides the strategic advancement of businesses towards honing gender-specific features in voice-activated shopping technology platforms to drive consumer engagement.

51% of U.S. men prefer to buy online while 49% prefer to buy in a physical store.

Delving into the intricacies of gender-based shopping preferences, it’s intriguing to witness that 51% of U.S men favor online shopping, leaving a close 49% inclined towards in-store purchases. The slight tilt towards digital spending draws attention to the evolving landscape of retail behavior among men, accentuating the importance of e-commerce strategies for businesses. In the context of dissecting Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics, these figures help paint a more comprehensive picture of the distinct shopping habits and preferences observed among genders, thereby enabling marketers to formulate more tailored and effective strategies to engage their male customer base.

65% of men said they shopped online to save time, while only 55% of women gave the same reason.

Unveiling interesting insights in our exploration of Male vs Female Shopping Statistics, the fact that 65% of men reported shopping online to save time, in contrast to just 55% of women revealing the same motivation, offers a fascinating glimpse into the behavioral discrepancies between genders. It strongly implies that time-efficiency might have more appeal in the world of E-commerce for men than it does for women. Clearly, these figures could guide strategic crafting of online platforms, providing cues for tailoring website navigability and influencing marketing strategies for online businesses. Capitalizing on these nuances could help businesses in significantly boosting their gender-based user engagement and experience.

26% of men said they shop online at work, compared with 15% of women.

When diving into the riveting realm of Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics, one can’t help but notice a curious divergence. A sparkling 26% of working men showcase a preference for easing their workload with a dash of online retail therapy, as compared to a relatively modest 15% of their female counterparts. This nuance doesn’t only reflect unique gender-based shopping behaviours but also potentially influences online marketers’ strategies, web design orientations, and maybe even workplace policies. Ils sont fous, ces hommes.

47% of female consumers say that a personalized offer from a brand can highly influence what they purchase vs. 35% for males.

Navigating the labyrinth of consumer behavior is a mandate for any marketer. When it comes to the gender divide, a striking skew becomes apparent from the statistic – 47% of female consumers confess that personalized offers significantly sway their purchasing while only 35% of male shoppers echo this sentiment. Thus, in a discourse on Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics, it is important to take note of this difference. It subtly underlines the higher receptivity of women towards customized incentives, making personalization a potent weapon in the marketer’s arsenal for female-targeted campaigns. This variance also underscores the necessity for distinct marketing strategy formulations for different genders.

Nearly 40% of women have made a purchase on their smartphones while visiting a brick-and-mortar store.

This intriguing finding that nearly 40% of women have shopped on their smartphones while in a physical store demonstrates a significant gender-determined shopping pattern, conducive to an in-depth discussion in a blog post on Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics. It indicates a substantial female tendency towards digitized comparison shopping, warranting businesses to adapt their strategies to enhance real-time mobile shopping experiences. Therefore, acknowledging this statistic could provide valuable insights into the evolving motivations and behaviors female consumers exhibit, which could further drive gender-specific marketing strategies for businesses aiming to tap into the potential of this demographic, differentiating them from their male counterparts.

50% of females make a shopping list before going out to shop, as compared to 36% of males.

Delving into the realm of ‘Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics’, our fascinating data exhibit some distinct gender-based differences which distinctly emerge. Unveiling a particular revelation, there seems to be a noteworthy trend indicating that 50% of females prepare a shopping list before venturing out to shop, distinctly higher than 36% of their male counterparts. This striking discrepancy underscores the contrasting shopping behaviors between the sexes. Females typically exhibiting tendency for more organized, well-thought-out purchasing decisions, while a lesser proportion of males show this habit. Recognizing these behavioral patterns could equip businesses with valuable insights for developing gender-specific strategies, ultimately enhancing consumer engagement and satisfaction.

In 2019, 22% of men made a purchase on the internet daily or almost daily compared with 18% of women.

In the grand comparison of Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics, a significant fissure emerges when one considers the figures from 2019: 22% of men availed online shopping either on daily or nearly daily basis, as opposed to 18% of women. This information not only punctures the traditional notion of women being the predominant demographic in retail therapy, but it also suggests a shift in the online commercial landscape. In essence, it illuminates the fact that men have become an equally, if not more, crucial demographic in the realm of online sales, which is a key insight for digital marketers and companies to strategically cater to this proclivity.

Men are more likely than women to make purchases on mobile apps, with 68% saying they’ve made at least one in the past month, compared to 56% of women.

Unveiling a revealing dimension of the online shopping landscape, the statistic articulates that a greater percentage of men, at 68%, have embraced the realm of mobile app purchases in the recent month in comparison to the 56% of women. These numbers work to shatter the stereotypical preconception that women dominate online shopping. For marketers, businesses, or anyone writing a blog post about Male Vs Female Shopping Statistics, understanding this nuanced pattern in buying behaviors across genders can offer valuable insights. They can direct their efforts more effectively by tailoring marketing strategies that resonate with the male demographic for mobile app purchases, thereby potentially boosting their sales.

Conclusion

Based on the data gathered and examined, it’s evident that both male and female shopping behaviors exhibit unique characteristics. Men tend to prefer swift, straightforward shopping experiences, often knowing precisely what they want, while women are generally more exploratory, taking their time to compare products before making a decision. These insights are crucial for businesses, enabling them to tailor their marketing strategies effectively to suit each demographic’s distinct patterns. Nonetheless, it’s important to remember that these trends do not necessarily apply to every individual’s shopping behavior as personal preferences can vary widely within gender groups.

References

0. – https://www.www.bigcommerce.com

1. – https://www.www.statista.com

2. – https://www.www.firstinsight.com

3. – https://www.www.creditcards.com

4. – https://www.www.digitalcommerce360.com

5. – https://www.www.oberlo.com

6. – https://www.www.thinkwithgoogle.com

7. – https://www.www.exchangewire.com

8. – https://www.www.evergage.com

FAQs

Who shops more frequently, men or women?

Statistically, women tend to shop more frequently than men.

Who spends more time shopping, men or women?

On average, women spend more time shopping than men. Women often take time to browse, compare options, and think about their purchases, while men tend to be more direct and spend less time.

Do men and women spend their money on different types of products?

Yes, generally, men tend to spend more on technology, tools and alcohol, while women spend more on clothing, accessories, and beauty products.

What is the preferred mode of shopping for men and women – online or in-store?

While both men and women shop both online and in-store, recent trends show that both genders increasingly prefer online shopping for its convenience. However, women are more likely to shop in-store for items like clothes, cosmetics, and food.

Do men and women respond differently to sales and discounts?

Yes, statistically, women are more likely to be influenced by sales, discounts, and special promotions than men. Men tend to be more price insensitive, although they too appreciate a good deal.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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