GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Livestock Death Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Livestock Death Statistics

  • In the summer of 2017, over a million livestock died as a result of severe drought in Mongolia.
  • Livestock loss to predation in the U.S. stands at more than 220,000 animals each year.
  • Wildfires in Australia in 2020 resulted in the death of over 100,000 livestock.
  • In 2018, extreme cold weather killed 1,600 livestock in Northern Mongolia.
  • For a 5-year period (2000-2004), the average number of sheep deaths due to predation annually was about 224,200 in the U.S.
  • In the U.S. 2.5 million cattle were lost to causes other than slaughter in 2015.
  • The British cattle industry lost 40,000 cattle to Bovine Tuberculosis in 2012 alone.
  • In France, over 19% of livestock death is due to digestive disorders.
  • In Nigeria, approximately 28.57% of livestock deaths are due to tsetse fly bites and African animal trypanosomiasis.
  • About 5% of livestock in India die annually due to various diseases.
  • In Portugal, parasitic gastroenteritis was the cause of 20.31% of deaths in young cattle.
  • In 2020, an estimated 7,000 livestock were lost in floods in Kenya.
  • In 2013, 45% of recorded equine deaths in the United Kingdom were due to colic.
  • In South Africa in 2015, droughts caused the deaths of 14,000 livestock.
  • In Nepal in 2015, foot-and-mouth disease resulted in a death rate of 1.1% in affected cattle.
  • Livestock diseases are responsible for 20% of losses in the livestock industry in Africa.
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Dissecting the intricate yet fascinating realm of livestock death statistics, this blog post shines a light on the critical yet often overlooked information pertaining to our farming industry. A deep understanding of these statistics uncovers implications about animal health, disease patterns, climate issues, economic influences, and ultimately, food security. Whether you are a farmer, a stakeholder in the agricultural sector, or just a curious consumer, this dive into the numerical world of livestock deaths will provide a fresh perspective on the intricate orchestration of our food supply systems.

The Latest Livestock Death Statistics Unveiled

In the summer of 2017, over a million livestock died as a result of severe drought in Mongolia.

Invoking the chilling memory of the 2017 Mongolian catastrophe, where a staggering number of over a million livestock succumbed to an unforgiving drought, serves as a stark example of nature’s devastating impact on livestock populations. This tragic event provides a crucial data point underscoring the profound consequences of extreme weather on livestock, an angle that lends gravity and urgency to our discussion on Livestock Death Statistics. Such episodes of mass mortality emphasize the importance of strategies for resilience and preparedness in the face of mounting climate-related threats to agriculture and livestock industry worldwide.

Livestock loss to predation in the U.S. stands at more than 220,000 animals each year.

Illuminating the stark reality of predator threat, recent data underlines that over 220,000 livestock animals falter in the claws and jaws of predators, annually in the U.S. alone. As the drumbeat of mortality tolls high, it becomes an intriguing aspect in our blog post about Livestock Death Statistics, as this number profoundly echoes the direct implication on the ranching industries’ economy and productivity. Moreover, it intensifies the urgency to explore and implement viable predator management strategies for securing the livelihoods of our livestock, strengthening sustainable food production, and maintaining ecological balance.

Wildfires in Australia in 2020 resulted in the death of over 100,000 livestock.

The statistic of over 100,000 livestock deaths from wildfires in Australia in 2020 paints a harrowing narrative, embossed with the dread and somber realities of climate change, in a blog post explicitly focusing on Livestock Death Statistics. It offers an unprecedented, vital glimpse into the devastating ripples that environmental disasters can send through the agricultural sector. This figure not only quantifies the sheer impact of such a tragedy but also evokes an understanding of the immense economic repercussions, and the significant toll it takes on the livelihoods of farmers. Moreover, it infuses an urgency to acknowledge, address and adapt to these escalating environmental issues embedding a broader perspective to our understanding of livestock mortality.

In 2018, extreme cold weather killed 1,600 livestock in Northern Mongolia.

Unveiling the harsh realities of nature’s impact on herding culture, the tragic loss of 1,600 livestock in Northern Mongolia in 2018 due to extreme cold weather showcases the relationship between climate conditions and livestock mortality. This stark number is essential when studying Livestock Death Statistics, serving as a poignant reminder that climate change poses a monumental threat to the agricultural sector. It prompts a more profound examination into the susceptibility of livestock to environmental shifts, urging policymakers, researchers, and societies to instigate versatile strategies that better shield these valuable assets from weather-related adversities.

For a 5-year period (2000-2004), the average number of sheep deaths due to predation annually was about 224,200 in the U.S.

The narrative woven from the number suggests a somber drama in the livestock industry—224,200 sheep falling to predation annually from 2000 to 2004 across the U.S. These death tolls, far from just abstract figures, sketch a vivid representation of the precarious balance between nature and agriculture. They underscore not only the magnitude of losses livestock owners bear but also the broader implications on pricing, supply, and ultimately, our dinner tables. It’s a stark reminder that behind the lamb chops in your local market is an ever-looming conflict in the farms—a ceaseless struggle against predators—that endangers the health and sustainability of the livestock industry.

In the U.S. 2.5 million cattle were lost to causes other than slaughter in 2015.

Diving into the startling reality of livestock mortality, the figure ‘In the U.S., 2.5 million cattle were lost to causes other than slaughter in 2015,’ seizes our attention. In the dynamic landscape of livestock farming, these losses, amounting to substantial economic and productivity implications, paint a rather grim portrait of the challenges breeders face. These unaccounted deaths, straying far from the expected end in slaughterhouses, hint towards a myriad of underlying issues. They span from disease outbreaks, predation, and harsh weather conditions to inadequate husbandry practices. Thus, this statistic underlines the urgency for improved herd management strategies, efficient veterinary care, and sturdy preventive measures to secure livestock health—creating a resilient animal agriculture industry.

The British cattle industry lost 40,000 cattle to Bovine Tuberculosis in 2012 alone.

Peering into the chilling abyss of livestock death statistics, one cannot overlook the harrowing chapter of 2012 in the British cattle industry, when Bovine Tuberculosis claimed an alarming 40,000 cattle lives. This staggering figure not only underscores the massive scale of animal health challenges in agriculture, but also points towards the profound economic implications for farmers, the meat industry and the national economy at large. Furthermore, such an event triggers critical discussions about disease prevention and control strategies, animal welfare, and food safety, making it a pivotal reference point in any discourse about livestock mortality.

In France, over 19% of livestock death is due to digestive disorders.

Highlighting the statistic of over 19% of livestock deaths in France being due to digestive disorders brings forth an integral aspect of animal husbandry in the spotlight. It showcases the pressing issue of nutritional health within the livestock industry, sparking conversations on effective feeding strategies, preventative healthcare, and diagnostic improvements. Understanding and addressing this significant percentage can not only reduce mortality rates, but also enhance overall animal welfare, ensuring the livestock industry’s sustainability and profitability.

In Nigeria, approximately 28.57% of livestock deaths are due to tsetse fly bites and African animal trypanosomiasis.

With an alarmingly high figure of 28.57% attributable to tsetse fly bites and African animal trypanosomiasis, the threat faced by Nigeria’s livestock population is brought into a stark and sobering light. This percentage not only underscores the significant role these factors play in the mortality rates of livestock in Nigeria, but it also highlights the urgent need for interventions and preventive measures. In a country where livestock plays an integral part in the economy and sustenance, understanding this grave statistic can catalyze discussions, ignite research, and potentiate policy-making that could ultimately safeguard the prosperity of Nigeria’s livestock industry.

About 5% of livestock in India die annually due to various diseases.

Sprinkling some gritty reality into the discussion of livestock health, bear in mind a sobering data point: roughly 5% of livestock in India don’t survive each year owing to a multitude of diseases. The magnitude of this statistic underscores the harsh plight suffered by these animals, a story often overlooked in discussions surrounding agriculture and food supply. Interrogating such figures reveals the lurking threats to sustainable farming, pointing towards disease control and animal health as pivotal areas warranting further study, intervention, and policy design. Therefore, when decoding the complexities of livestock death statistics, this percentage stands as an unyielding pillar of concern, ringing alarm bells for farmers, veterinarians, environmentalists, and policymakers alike.

In Portugal, parasitic gastroenteritis was the cause of 20.31% of deaths in young cattle.

Highlighting the statistic, ‘In Portugal, parasitic gastroenteritis accounted for 20.31% of young cattle deaths’ underlines a significant health concern within Portugal’s cattle farming industry. This infection not only impacts the cattle’s wellbeing but also presents a substantial fiscal toll, affecting the farmer’s income and the overall productivity of livestock sectors. Furthermore, it might affect the meat supply chain and potentially inflate beef prices. Insightful for farmers, veterinarians, and policymakers, this datum emphasizes the urgency of developing robust preventive measures and effective treatment strategies, to reduce mortality rates and bolster the livestock industry’s health and economic viability.

In 2020, an estimated 7,000 livestock were lost in floods in Kenya.

Looking at the raw numbers, the loss of approximately 7,000 livestock to floods in Kenya in 2020 reveals a somber picture. In a blog post unraveling livestock death statistics, these figures dramatically underscore the devastating impact of extreme weather events on the agricultural economy. This figure from Kenya not only represents considerable financial loss for farmers who depend on this sector for livelihood but also highlights the increasing vulnerability of livestock to climate change. Thus, these numbers underscore the urgent need for effective disaster response plans and livestock insurance policies in ensuring food security and farmers’ economic stability in a warming planet.

In 2013, 45% of recorded equine deaths in the United Kingdom were due to colic.

Unraveling the intricate tale of livestock death statistics, the revelation that in 2013 in the United Kingdom, nearly half (45%) of recorded equine fatalities were attributed to colic strikes a resonating chord. This chilling number serves as a stark reminder of the susceptibility of our livestock population to health afflictions and elucidates the magnitude of this specific equine health issue. For equine enthusiasts, veterinarians, and livestock holders, it underscores the necessity for increased scrutiny of horse health, preventive measures, early detection, and efficient treatment strategies against colic, thereby shaping a proactive discourse around livestock health management.

In South Africa in 2015, droughts caused the deaths of 14,000 livestock.

Casting a haunting shadow over the livestock industry of South Africa in 2015, an appalling death toll of 14,000 livestock was recorded due to devastating drought conditions. When brought into the limelight within a blog post revolving around Livestock Death Statistics, this grim data point paints a somber picture of the environmental challenges farmers face, and the substantial direct and indirect implications of extreme weather conditions on food security, local economies, and overall livestock health. It underscores the necessity for effective contingency planning, better farm management strategies, and climate-resilient farming technologies in alleviating future livestock mortality.

In Nepal in 2015, foot-and-mouth disease resulted in a death rate of 1.1% in affected cattle.

Delineating the impact of foot-and-mouth disease on livestock, the fact that Nepal witnessed a death rate of 1.1% in affected cattle in 2015 paints a stark picture of the disease’s repercussion on animal health. In the context of a blog post elucidating Livestock Death Statistics, this nugget of information underscores the critical role of disease management in livestock farming and reinforces the potential economic implications for a country heavily reliant on its livestock for sustenance.

Livestock diseases are responsible for 20% of losses in the livestock industry in Africa.

With a spotlight on Livestock Death Statistics, the revelation that a significant one-fifth of livestock industry losses in Africa are attributable to diseases is alarmingly impactful. This underscores the critical challenge associated with health problems among animal populations and the dire need for proactive interventions. This data not only informs policy redirection towards the improvement of veterinary care services, but also serves as base-line information for stakeholders to create more efficient management practices. Ultimately, this statistic is a powerful prompt demanding urgent attention and resources to protect the livelihoods and food security of countless individuals depending on this vital industry.

Conclusion

The comprehensive review of Livestock Death Statistics underscores the significance of effective herd management and disease prevention measures in the farming industry. It’s evident that farmers need to continually adapt and develop strategies in response to the dynamics of disease prevalence, environmental changes, or disasters. Indeed, analyzing and understanding these death statistics can help to create a more resilient agricultural sector and sustainable food systems, globally.

References

0. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

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6. – https://www.www.farmers.co.ke

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8. – https://www.bmcvetres.biomedcentral.com

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FAQs

What are some common causes of livestock death?

Some top causes of livestock death include disease, exposure to harsh weather, predation, malnutrition, birthing complications, and sometimes human intervention (such as accident or neglect).

How is livestock mortality rate calculated?

Livestock mortality rate is usually calculated as the number of livestock deaths in a period divided by the total number of livestock at the start of the period, multiplied by 100 to give a percentage.

How does weather influence livestock mortality?

Weather can have serious impacts on livestock. Extreme heat or cold can lead to death, especially if animals do not have appropriate shelter. Indirectly, weather can also influence the availability and quality of pasture, affecting nutrition and thereby contributing to animal health and survival.

How do diseases contribute to livestock mortality?

Diseases are a major factor in livestock mortality. This includes both diseases spread by parasites or vectors, and infectious diseases that can rapidly spread through a herd, flock, or other grouping of animals. Vaccination and other veterinary care can help to prevent some of these issues, but not all diseases are preventable or treatable.

What are some strategies to reduce livestock mortality?

Strategies to reduce livestock mortality include providing appropriate shelter, nutritional diet, maintaining sanitary conditions, regular checks for signs of illness or injury, separating sick animals from the healthy ones, and following a regular vaccination and deworming program.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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