GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Male Vs Female Std Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Male Vs Female Std Statistics

  • "Men are less likely than women to have received HPV vaccination. According to CDC in 2018, 51.1% of women aged 19-26 years received one dose or more of HPV vaccine, compared with 27.6% of men aged 19–26 years.".
  • "Women are diagnosed with chlamydia at about twice the rate of men. In 2018, the rate among women was 643.3 cases per 100,000 females and the rate among men was 278.4 cases per 100,000 males.".
  • "In 2017, men accounted for 75% of all syphilis cases. In contrast, females accounted for 88% of all chlamydia cases.".
  • "According to the CDC, men make up 85% of primary and secondary syphilis cases.".
  • "Men are less likely to report or seek treatment for STD symptoms, which may contribute to women having higher rates of some STDs.".
  • "More females (39%) reported receiving testing for STDs during their last healthcare visit than males (31.4%).".
  • "In 2016, there were 1.9 men living with HIV for each woman living with the virus.".
  • "By the end of 2016, the rate of diagnosed HIV infection for adult and adolescent females was 130.6 per 100,000. Among adult and adolescent males, it was 593.5 per 100,000.".

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In the arena of public health, understanding the demographic dynamics of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) is crucial for implementing effective preventative measures and treatments. Our blog post today sheds light on the often-overlooked angle of gender patterns in STD incidence. We’ll delve into comparative statistics of STD occurrence in males and females, providing evidence-based insights to better grasp how these diseases affect the two genders differently. Unpacking these differences may not only reveal the underlying reasons but also aid in tailoring gender-appropriate interventions for STD control.

The Latest Male Vs Female Std Statistics Unveiled

“Men are less likely than women to have received HPV vaccination. According to CDC in 2018, 51.1% of women aged 19-26 years received one dose or more of HPV vaccine, compared with 27.6% of men aged 19–26 years.”.

Diving into the world of STD statistics in the context of gender, one intriguing find surrounds the HPV vaccination. The CDC, in 2018, highlighted a discernable difference between genders in the uptake of the vaccine: 51.1% of women aged 19-26 years versus a mere 27.6% of men within the same age range. This disparity underlines the necessity for amplified efforts in promoting HPV vaccination among men. It underscores a potential gap in our STD prevention strategy, considering HPV is responsible for a host of different cancers that can affect both men and women. It brings to light the importance of addressing gender disparities in STD prevention, apparently more paramount than we’ve previously acknowledged.

“Women are diagnosed with chlamydia at about twice the rate of men. In 2018, the rate among women was 643.3 cases per 100,000 females and the rate among men was 278.4 cases per 100,000 males.”.

The striking differential rates of chlamydia diagnosis between women and men, portrayed by the 2018 data where women evidenced a rate of 643.3 cases per 100,000 as compared to 278.4 cases men per 100,000 males, paints a compelling picture of the gender disparity in STD statistics. This unchecked predominance in diagnosis among women could bolster discussions on the myriad biological, behavioral, and societal factors influencing these disparities. Furthermore, it firmly underlines the critical need for targeted prevention strategies, regular screenings, increased awareness, and sexual health education particularly tailored towards the vulnerable populations.

“In 2017, men accounted for 75% of all syphilis cases. In contrast, females accounted for 88% of all chlamydia cases.”.

Highlighting the intriguing polarization and gender deviation in STD cases, data introducing a new dimension to our understanding of these diseases creates substantial emphasis. Specifically, the predominance of syphilis found in men back in 2017, which stood at a striking 75%, contrasting with the 88% rate for chlamydia cases in women. This discrepancy amplifies the necessity for sex-specific prevention strategies, education, and medical services. Also, it fosters a nuanced discourse within our blog post concerning varied disease susceptibility and behavior patterns across genders, thereby revamping the conventional narrative about STDs.

“According to the CDC, men make up 85% of primary and secondary syphilis cases.”.

Delineating the gender-based influence in STD transmission uncovers striking realities. The statistic from the CDC, emphasizing that men constitute 85% of primary and secondary syphilis cases, highlights a stark disproportion in the occurrence of this particular STD. It prompts an essential discourse on the cascading influence of socio-behavioral factors, healthcare accessibility, and sexual health education affecting men. Within the scope of a comparison between male and female STD statistics, it bears significance, paving the way for targeted preventative strategies, awareness initiatives, and therapeutic interventions.

“Men are less likely to report or seek treatment for STD symptoms, which may contribute to women having higher rates of some STDs.”.

The intriguing trend highlighted by the statistic, ‘Men are less likely to report or seek treatment for STD symptoms, which may contribute to women having higher rates of some STDs,’ adds a compelling layer to the discussion of Male Vs Female STD rates. It underlines a significant behavioral variation between the genders, putting forth that societal pressures, stigma, or misconceptions might deter men from acknowledging symptoms or pursuing necessary healthcare. This reluctance potentially exacerbates the STD burden for women, as undiagnosed or untreated infections might unknowingly be passed on. This insight implores healthcare professionals, advocates, and educators to recalibrate their strategies, focusing on male engagement and broader understanding of STD repercussions to lessen the overall STD prevalence.

“More females (39%) reported receiving testing for STDs during their last healthcare visit than males (31.4%).”.

Delving into the realm of Male vs Female STD statistics, a compelling statistic divulges that more females (39%) reported receiving STD testing during their last healthcare visit compared to males (31.4%). This discrepancy not only underscores the heightened proactiveness among women regarding sexual health but also hints at a potential neglect or hesitation among men. The crucial conversation about STD risks and prevention, therefore, needs to lean into this gender gap, encouraging more males to up their testing rates for the broader societal goal of disease control and prevention.

“In 2016, there were 1.9 men living with HIV for each woman living with the virus.”.

Highlighting the statistic ‘ “In 2016, there were 1.9 men living with HIV for each woman living with the virus.”.’ amplifies the gravity of gender disparity when it comes to occurrences of HIV worldwide. Focusing on this sobering ratio underscores the need for targeted intervention and preventative measures specifically aimed at men, who make up the larger proportion of the infected population. In the context of male vs female STD statistics, it serves to illuminate male susceptibility and the imperative call for more equitable distribution of resources, education, and initiatives in the fight against HIV/AIDS and other STIs.

“By the end of 2016, the rate of diagnosed HIV infection for adult and adolescent females was 130.6 per 100,000. Among adult and adolescent males, it was 593.5 per 100,000.”.

The captivating dichotomy between the rates of diagnosed HIV infection in adult and adolescent males and females, respectively 593.5 and 130.6 per 100,000 at the close of 2016, illustrates a stark gender disparity. Its significance punctuates the dialogue of the blog article on Male Vs Female STD Statistics, fostering a deeper understanding of the gender-related trends and implications in the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases. Reflecting a nearly five-fold higher prevalence in males, this statistic underscores the need for targeted interventions, prevention strategies, and further studies to decode the underlying causes behind this overwhelming discrepancy.

Conclusion

In comparing male and female STD statistics, it is essential to note that the patterns of infection are contingent on several factors, such as medical access, socioeconomic status, and sexual behavior. Studies reveal that women often face higher risks and severe health consequences from STDs compared to men. However, these circumstances should not downplay the fact that men, too, are significantly affected and play vital roles in transmission. Through this statistic analysis, the urgency for gender-specific public health interventions in sexual health becomes absolutely clear.

References

0. – https://www.www.everydayhealth.com

1. – https://www.www.kff.org

2. – https://www.www.healthy.arkansas.gov

3. – https://www.www.unaids.org

4. – https://www.www.statista.com

5. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

FAQs

Which gender is more likely to contract an STD?

The susceptibility to contract STDs depends on a variety of factors including the number of sexual partners, engagement in unprotected sex, substance abuse, etc., and it is not solely dependent on gender. However, some studies suggest that females are biologically more prone to certain STDs such as gonorrhea and herpes due to their anatomy.

Which STDs are more prevalent in men?

Gonorrhea and syphilis are commonly seen in men, especially men having sex with men. However, the prevalence of STDs can greatly vary based on geographical location, societal norms, sexual behaviours, and preventative measures taken.

Are the symptoms of STDs different between males and females?

Yes, the symptoms of STDs can vary between males and females. For instance, men with chlamydia might experience discharge, burning during urination, and tender or swollen testicles, while women may experience abnormal vaginal discharge, burning during urination, and in some cases, lower abdominal pain.

How do STD screening recommendations differ for males and females?

Screening recommendations vary on the basis of sexual behaviors and individual risk factors rather than gender. However, there are certain recommendations specifically targeting females such as regular Pap tests to check for HPV virus, which can lead to cervical cancer. Routine screenings for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea are also advised for sexually active females below 25.

Are treatments for STDs different for males and females?

For most STDs, the treatment is not gender-specific and usually involves antibiotics or antiviral medications. However, women may need to take additional steps to prevent complications, such as pelvic inflammatory disease or fertility issues. Treatment is also different for pregnant women, as certain medications might be harmful to the fetus.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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