GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Male Vs Female Nurses Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Male Vs Female Nurses Statistics

  • As of 2015, 91.1% of all registered nurses in the US are female while 8.9% are male.
  • In a survey of 500 nurses, male nurses reported earning approximately $5,100 more per year than female nurses.
  • Male nurses make up about 10.7% of the workforce in the US in 2017, compared to 2.2% in 1960.
  • As of 2013 in the UK, only 11% of nursing staff were men.
  • In Australia, male nurses make up 12.5% of the nursing workforce in 2017.
  • In 2019 in Canada, male nurses accounted for 8.4% of the profession overall.
  • In Japan, male nurses accounted for 7.5% of the nursing workforce in 2018.
  • In the US in 2018, female nurses’ average hourly wage was $20, while male nurses’ average hourly wage was $24.
  • There was a 5% increase in male nurses in Brazil between 2000 and 2013.
  • Male nurses were 3 times more likely to have served in a military health system compared to female nurses in the US in 2015.
  • About 41% percent of nurse anesthetists are men, a significantly higher representation relative to other nursing professions.
  • Male nurses on average tend to be older than their female counterparts, with 41 being their average age compared to 39 for females.
  • In a 2019 survey, male nurses reported significantly higher job satisfaction than female nurses.
  • In Singapore in 2015, 23% of male nurses left their job within the first year compared to 18% of female nurses.
  • Polish male nurses accounted for 25.98% of the total nursing profession in 2020, one of the highest rates in the world.
  • In a 2010 survey, 45% of male nurses reported choosing nursing as their first career compared to 80% of their female counterparts.
  • According to a 2011 survey, 83% of male nurses said they would recommend nursing as a career, compared to 92% of female nurses.
  • In New Zealand in 2013, a study found that male nurses on average worked longer hours than their female counterparts.
  • In a 2014 UK study, nearly a quarter (24%) of male nurses reported experiencing bullying in the workplace, compared to 39% of female nurses.

Table of Contents

Welcome to an insightful exploration of data in the contemporary healthcare sector. We’re focusing on the gender divide in nursing roles, specifically comparing male and female nurses’ statistics. This post delves into the changing tides in a profession traditionally dominated by women but currently experiencing a sharp increase in male participation. From overall numbers to education level, job positions, salary range, and more, we’ll shed light on various aspects of the nursing profession divided by sex. Stay with us to uncover the notable trends and patterns shaping this critical workforce segment.

The Latest Male Vs Female Nurses Statistics Unveiled

As of 2015, 91.1% of all registered nurses in the US are female while 8.9% are male.

This interesting disparity shines a light on a notable imbalance in the nursing field, exhibiting a pronounced gender skew. The statistic, indicating that as of 2015, a hefty 91.1% of all nurses in the US were female, juxtaposed with a meager 8.9% being male, taps into a broader discussion about societal norms, opportunities, and career paths. Such information adds depth to the contemplation on the elements influencing this gender division in nursing, questions traditional perceptions about this vocation, and ignites conversation about initiatives to encourage a more diverse and representative workforce in the healthcare sector. These figures, whilst shedding light on the current situation, additionally provide a basis for comparison as we evaluate the effectiveness of future efforts in drawing more men into the nursing profession.

In a survey of 500 nurses, male nurses reported earning approximately $5,100 more per year than female nurses.

This captivating revelation, that male nurses earn approximately $5,100 more per year than their female counterparts, gleaned from a survey of 500 nurses, serves as a sobering reminder that gender wage disparities persist in the nursing field. In the arena of male versus female nurse statistics, this discrepancy accentuates the necessity for further exploration into the intricate dynamics of income parity, raw data notwithstanding. It consequently underscores the importance of acknowledging and addressing these gender-based discrepancies within this critical healthcare arena in subsequent replications of the study, fostering disparities dialogue, and forging an equitable path forward.

Male nurses make up about 10.7% of the workforce in the US in 2017, compared to 2.2% in 1960.

Highlighting the surge from 2.2% in 1960 to 10.7% in 2017, one can observe a clear upward trend in the representation of male nurses in the US workforce. This burgeoning growth underscores a shift in traditional gender roles within the nursing profession, punctuating the gradual attrition of the notion that nursing is a female-exclusive field. As part of a discussion on Male Vs Female Nurses Statistics, this particular statistic serves as a testament to the growing diversity in the healthcare sector, setting the stage for a more inclusive future domesticated by both genders equally contributing to the nursing landscape.

As of 2013 in the UK, only 11% of nursing staff were men.

Highlighting a stark gender disparity within the nursing field, the fact that as of 2013, merely 11% of nursing staff in the UK were men, indicates an intriguing dynamic. In a profession historically dominated by females, these figures serve as a crucial talking point in emphasizing the underrepresentation of men. This imbalance could potentially raise concerns regarding diversity within the sector, bringing to light questions around why such gendered perceptions persist within nursing, the potential effects of this on service provision, and what steps could be taken to encourage a more diverse and inclusive workforce within this crucial healthcare profession.

In Australia, male nurses make up 12.5% of the nursing workforce in 2017.

Peeling back the layers of the nursing demographics in Australia, an intriguing detail emerges: in 2017, male nurses were a scarce resource, making up just 12.5% of the nursing workforce. In the dialogue about male versus female nurse statistics, this nugget of data fuels the conversation, shining a spotlight on the gender imbalance in the field. It raises questions about societal norms, stereotypes, and the factors influencing men’s choices to pursue or steer clear from a nursing career. This percentage not merely enumerates, but also provides a glimpse into the challenges faced in rectifying this gender incongruity, ultimately driving further investigation into potential solutions.

In 2019 in Canada, male nurses accounted for 8.4% of the profession overall.

Highlighting the fact that, in 2019, male nurses constituted 8.4% of the nursing profession in Canada underscores the lingering gender imbalance in nursing. This figure serves as a benchmark by which we can assess both past trends and future progress. As the blog post explores the dynamics between male and female nurses, this key data point not only showcases the representation of males in the field, but also emphasizes yet unanswered sociological, educational, and workplace questions concerning why fewer men choose nursing as their vocation than women. This underrepresentation, though significantly better than a few decades ago, might stimulate discussions on addressing gender stereotypes, encouraging diversity and fostering inclusivity in the nursing profession.

In Japan, male nurses accounted for 7.5% of the nursing workforce in 2018.

Delving into the depths of Male Vs Female Nurses Statistics, the nugget of data that unveils Japan’s male nursing workforce comprising of a distinctive 7.5% in 2018 plays a significant role in broadening our understanding. This underscores a subtle shift in traditional gender roles within the nursing profession in Japan, where women typically dominate. Furthermore, this surprising shift provides fascinating insight into the evolving dynamics of the healthcare industry and the changing societal perspectives toward male nurses, igniting thought-provoking discussions around diversity, workplace adaptations, and opportunities for men in nursing.

In the US in 2018, female nurses’ average hourly wage was $20, while male nurses’ average hourly wage was $24.

The statistic–highlighting a significant wage differential in the U.S. nursing profession, where female nurses averaged an hourly wage of $20 compared to $24 for their male counterparts in 2018–seeks revelation. It offers a pivotal lens for our blog post delving into Male Vs Female Nurses Statistics. This disparity underscores a compelling facet of the broader conversation about gender pay gaps, even in predominantly female-driven professions such as nursing. Our post becomes a platform to shed light on these discrepancies; sparking discourse and awareness, and driving the necessity for systemic change towards equitable wage structures in the medical sector.

There was a 5% increase in male nurses in Brazil between 2000 and 2013.

Highlighting an upward trend of 5% in male nursing in Brazil from 2000 to 2013 diversifies our understanding of nursing’s gender distribution. This information breaks the conventional stereotype associating nursing primarily with females, enriching the conversation around Male Vs. Female Nurses Statistics. It hints towards a global shift in nursing demographics, nudging readers to appreciate that gender roles in healthcare are evolving, making the profession more inclusive and comprehensive. It offers a fresh perspective and sets the stage for more dialogue and exploration on this vital subject.

Male nurses were 3 times more likely to have served in a military health system compared to female nurses in the US in 2015.

Peeling back the layers of the divergent paths to nursing, one striking revelation from 2015 sheds light on the gender dynamics at play within the industry. Unveiling the nuanced details, data revealed that male nurses in the U.S were triply likely to have dabbled in military health systems compared to their female counterparts. This revelation not only adds a unique color to the professional backgrounds of male nurses, but also speaks volumes about the intriguing intersection of gender and military service within the nursing profession. Painting male nurses in a novel light, this statistic serves to deepen the analysis in our blog post about Male Vs Female Nurses Statistics, opening up discussions about the differential avenues and experiences that mark the nursing journeys of men and women.

About 41% percent of nurse anesthetists are men, a significantly higher representation relative to other nursing professions.

Highlighting the figure of male nurse anesthetist representation at 41% unveils a fascinating facet in the narrative of male vs female nurses statistics. This number, while seemingly just another percentage, in fact significantly disrupts traditional gender roles and stereotypes within the nursing profession, showing a distinctive trend of men gravitating towards high-stress, high-responsibility roles such as anesthetists. It serves to challenge the archaic notion that men are the minority in nursing careers, emphasizing that the presence of male nurses is not only substantial but also shows noteworthy dominance in certain fields. This paints a more detailed, multi-dimensional picture of gender in nursing and invites further exploration into evolving male contributions in this industry.

Male nurses on average tend to be older than their female counterparts, with 41 being their average age compared to 39 for females.

Surveying the age landscape within the nursing profession, it’s intriguing to observe the slight age divergence between the sexes. The average age of male nurses stands at 41, nudging past their female counterparts, who average at 39. This nuance paints a richer picture of the nursing demographic, offering insights into possible career trajectory differences, experience levels, and potentially even workplace dynamics. More than mere figures, these statistics reinforce the diversity inherent in the nursing field, providing stakeholders with critical data for making informed decisions and strategies.

In a 2019 survey, male nurses reported significantly higher job satisfaction than female nurses.

Diving into the realm of male versus female nurses statistics, an intriguing insight emerges from a 2019 survey in the blog post. It navigates the often-overlooked aspect of job satisfaction, uncovering that male nurses testified to substantial job contentment exceeding their female counterparts. It accentuates the gender divergence in the nursing profession, hinting at probable variations in their work experience, sector culture, or personal outlook. This compelling nugget of information necessitates further exploration to comprehend the root causes better, potentially influening nurse’s recruitment, retention strategies, and overall efforts to bridge the satisfaction gap in this essential profession.

In Singapore in 2015, 23% of male nurses left their job within the first year compared to 18% of female nurses.

Shedding light on an often overlooked dimension of healthcare, these statistics on Singaporean nursing in 2015 underline a noteworthy trend in the professional longevity of male nurses vis-à-vis their female counterparts. A striking 23% of male nurses opted to exit their jobs within the first year—a full 5% more than female nurses. This juxtaposition offers a compelling prompt for discussion on the underlying causes. Could it be factors such as societal narratives, workplace dynamics, or a combination of both that contribute to this difference? By zooming in on these figures, an intriguing canvas for further examination into the world of male versus female nurse dynamics is unveiled.

Polish male nurses accounted for 25.98% of the total nursing profession in 2020, one of the highest rates in the world.

Unveiling the face of gender diversity in nursing, the eye-opening figure of Polish male nurses constituting 25.98% of the total nursing profession in 2020, among the highest globally, serves as a compelling revelation. Casting light on the progressively shifting dynamics and debunking traditional gender roles within the healthcare industry, this statistic not only portrays Poland’s substantial strides towards inclusion and equality but also provides an encouraging scenario for other countries fostering male participation in a dominantly female-oriented field. Such a trend-setting example becomes more striking in a narrative focusing on Male Vs Female nurses statistics, providing a sturdy springboard for deeper analysis and discussion.

In a 2010 survey, 45% of male nurses reported choosing nursing as their first career compared to 80% of their female counterparts.

Drawing from the 2010 survey that suggests a stark contrast in the percentages of males (45%) and females (80%) who selected nursing as their initial career choice, an intriguing narrative or question blossoms about gender and career selection within the healthcare sector. This data point could serve as a catalyst for discussions or deeper analysis into underlying reasons, be it societal expectations, innate preferences, or educational influences, that contribute to such a significant gender divergence in nursing. Thus, it is highly valuable for shedding light on inherent motivations and patterns among male and female nurses establishing their professional paths, which can ultimately enrich our understanding in a blog post contrasting Male Vs Female Nurses Statistics.

According to a 2011 survey, 83% of male nurses said they would recommend nursing as a career, compared to 92% of female nurses.

The aforementioned statistic casts a striking spotlight on the differential perceptions regarding the nursing profession between genders. Within the confines of a 2011 survey, it was revealed that a substantial portion of male nurses – 83% to be precise – would endorse nursing as a viable career pathway, a figure notably lower than their female counterparts, 92% of whom gave similar endorsements. This disparity underscores noteworthy variations in the male vs female nurses narrative, implying that despite the healthcare sector’s growing inclusivity, there might still exist subtle yet crucial distinctions between the experiences and viewpoints of male and female nursing professionals. Consequently, this fosters a richer understanding of the dynamics and complexities within the nursing industry, which is instrumental while strategizing for more balanced work environments and promoting nursing as an equally appealing selection, irrespective of gender.

In New Zealand in 2013, a study found that male nurses on average worked longer hours than their female counterparts.

Illuminating a contrast within the nursing field, the revelation that male nurses in New Zealand worked more hours on average than their female counterparts in 2013 showcases a lesser-observed dynamic of the gender divide. Within the realm of nursing—which is frequently stereotyped as a predominantly female profession—this data point sheds light on the differing experiences of male and female nurses. It acts as a window into exploring the reasons behind these patterns, bringing to the fore factors like opportunity, workload balance, societal expectations, and life-work equilibrium. This nugget of information proves an enticing hook that invites readers to delve deeper into the multifaceted world of nursing under a gender lens.

In a 2014 UK study, nearly a quarter (24%) of male nurses reported experiencing bullying in the workplace, compared to 39% of female nurses.

Highlighting the fact that 24% of male nurses reported experiencing workplace bullying, compared to 39% of female nurses, in a 2014 UK study, gives an in-depth understanding of the disparities between male and female nurses’ experiences in the healthcare workforce. These numbers illustrate a significant problem in the nursing profession—bullying—and how it disproportionately affects female nurses. This underscores the need to address workplace dynamics and promote a more inclusive environment, with special attention given to combating sexism and biases. Evaluating such statistics is critical in fostering an improved understanding of the gender differences at play and sparking necessary changes in the health care arena.

Conclusion

Upon examining the current data regarding male and female nurses, a noticeable gender imbalance persists in the nursing profession, with women significantly outnumbering men. However, there’s a rising trend in the number of male nurses entering the field, demonstrating a positive shift towards gender diversity. Despite historical stereotypes, the profession is slowly becoming more balanced, acknowledging skills and competencies over gender. However, there’s a long way to go in achieving complete parity and dismantling deep-rooted gender norms in the nursing profession.

References

0. – https://www.www.minoritynurse.com

1. – https://www.cna-aiic.ca

2. – https://www.www.advisory.com

3. – https://www.www.nursingtimes.net

4. – https://www.www.abc.net.au

5. – https://www.www.scielo.br

6. – https://www.healthcareers.co

7. – https://www.healthforce.ucsf.edu

8. – https://www.www.nursinglicensure.org

9. – https://www.rcni.com

10. – https://www.www.wgu.edu

11. – https://www.japantoday.com

12. – https://www.www.asiaone.com

13. – https://www.www.theatlantic.com

14. – https://www.www.nursingworld.org

15. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

16. – https://www.minoritynurse.com

17. – https://www.www.nurse.com

18. – https://www.www.nursingcouncil.org.nz

FAQs

What is the proportion of males to females in the nursing industry?

According to data from the U.S. Census Bureau, around 10% to 12% of registered nurses are male, meaning that there are about 9 female nurses for every male nurse.

Are there any differences in the specialties chosen by male and female nurses?

Studies show some gender differences in specialized areas. For instance, male nurses are more likely to work in critical care and emergency departments, while female nurses are more common in obstetrics and pediatrics departments.

Are there pay differences between male and female nurses?

According to various researches, including the U.S. Census Bureau, there is a pay gap with male nurses often earning more than their female colleagues. The median weekly earnings for male nurses were found to be about 18% higher than for female nurses.

How does the job satisfaction level compare between male and female nurses?

Job satisfaction may depend more on individual circumstances and less on gender. However, some studies show that male nurses report slightly higher job satisfaction, possibly due to higher pay rates and underrepresentation, making them more in-demand in the industry.

Are there differences in the challenges faced by male and female nurses?

Each gender faces different challenges in the profession. Male nurses often face stereotypes that nursing is a 'female profession', leading to issues with acceptance and validity. Female nurses, on the other hand, may face challenges relating to work-life balance due to societal expectations for them to handle family responsibilities.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents