GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Fireworks Injury Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Fireworks Injury Statistics

  • In 2019, U.S. hospital emergency departments treated an estimated 10,000 firework injuries.
  • About 7,300 fireworks-related injuries (73% of annual fireworks-related injuries) were reported around July 4th in 2019.
  • Injuries from fireworks accounted for an estimated 9.1% of the total estimated emergency department-treated, product-related injuries in 2018.
  • Children younger than 15 years of age accounted for approximately 36% of the estimated 2010 injuries.
  • More than half of the emergency department-treated, fireworks-related injuries were burns.
  • Of the patients treated in 2019, about 36 percent were children younger than 15 years of age.
  • Males represented 76% of the emergency department-treated, fireworks-related injuries in 2019.
  • In 2018, hands and fingers were the body parts most often injured by fireworks (28 percent).
  • Of the fireworks-related injuries sustained, 44% were to extremities and 34% were to the eye or other parts of the head in 2019.
  • Firecrackers were the type of firework most often associated with injuries (18 percent).
  • The risk of fireworks injury was highest for young people ages 10-14, with more than twice the risk for the general population in 2018.
  • Fireworks caused an estimated 19,500 fires in 2018.
  • On average, 180 people go to the emergency room every day with fireworks-related injuries in the month around the July 4th holiday.
  • Sparklers were the number one cause of injuries, accounting for roughly one-quarter of emergency department visit.
  • Shell-and-mortar type fireworks were associated with the highest rates of emergency department-treated injuries.
  • In 2018, fireworks were involved in an estimated 9,100 injuries that were treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments.
  • Twelve people died due to fireworks in 2019.
  • About 900 emergency department-treated injuries were associated with sparklers and 400 with bottle rockets in 2019.
  • Fireworks cause an average of 4.5 death per year.
  • On Independence Day in a typical year, more U.S. fires are reported than on any other day, and fireworks account for more than half of those fires.

Table of Contents

Fireworks, while a captivating and exhilarating spectacle to most, can sometimes lead to unforeseen and unfortunate incidents. Our blog post this week delves deep into the world of Fireworks Injury Statistics, aiming to highlight the potential dangers associated with these light-emitting explosives. Through this examination, we strive to promote awareness and educate our readers on the importance of safety precautions during firework displays to mitigate these risks. Stay tuned as we unmask the statistical facts and figures behind these captivating yet potentially hazardous displays of pyrotechnic artistry.

The Latest Fireworks Injury Statistics Unveiled

In 2019, U.S. hospital emergency departments treated an estimated 10,000 firework injuries.

Highlighting that U.S. hospital emergency departments attended to an estimated 10,000 firework injuries in 2019 underscores the severity and widespread nature of this issue. This chilling number lets readers visualize the extent of the repercussions, amplifying the urgency of awareness and precautionary measures towards fireworks. Gaining knowledge through these shocking figures, readers may rethink their actions and influence others to prioritize safety. This statistic aids the post in illuminating the hidden dangers behind the sparkling facade of fireworks.

About 7,300 fireworks-related injuries (73% of annual fireworks-related injuries) were reported around July 4th in 2019.

Woven within the display of colors and explosive joy brought by fireworks, the spellbinding statistic of approximately 7,300 related injuries, representing a staggering 73% of the total annual count in 2019, all culminating around July 4th, paints a sobering image. The dazzling delight of the Independence Day celebrations often detracts from the silent peril lurking underneath. This statistic not only shines a spotlight on the dangerous underbelly of these pyrotechnic performances but also underscores the need for greater safety measures, vigilance, and public awareness to curtail the mounting tide of incidents. Featuring this statistic in a blog post on Fireworks Injury Statistics serves as a piercing reminder that amidst the sparkle and festivity, lies a cautionary tale of potential harm, thereby urging readers to exercise caution during such events.

Injuries from fireworks accounted for an estimated 9.1% of the total estimated emergency department-treated, product-related injuries in 2018.

As we illuminate the sky with the spectacle of fireworks, it’s imperative to remember that these twinkling displays also have the potential to tarnish the joy with their dangerous side. Often buried beneath their spectacular beauty, the lurking risks of fireworks are brought to light by the chilling statistic from 2018 that asserts: injuries from these vibrant displays accounted for an estimated 9.1% of total product-related injuries treated in emergency departments in that year. This critical data underpins the urgency of fostering safety precautions and raises a pressing appeal to prioritize responsible usage to mitigate the harmful impact of these visually appealing, yet potentially perilous, festal elements in our enlightening blog post about Fireworks Injury Statistics.

Children younger than 15 years of age accounted for approximately 36% of the estimated 2010 injuries.

Highlighting that approximately 36% of the estimated 2010 injuries were children younger than 15 presents a stark reality of the potential dangers of fireworks. This alarming statistic underscores the vulnerability of kids in such scenarios, urging parents, caregivers, and authorities alike to ensure stricter safety measures are in place during firework displays. It further serves as a harsh reminder for improved public awareness campaigns regarding firework safety, specifically tailored towards safeguarding our young ones.

More than half of the emergency department-treated, fireworks-related injuries were burns.

In the grand panorama of fireworks injury statistics, the fact that more than half of the injuries requiring emergency department treatment are burns casts a stark light on the dangerous liaison between revelry and recklessness. This statistic elucidates the severity of the risks involved in careless fireworks handling, underscoring the need for stringent safety measures and responsible behavior. By revealing the prevalence and severity of burns, this statistic creates a potent argument for caution and provides a basis for recommendations that could potentially save lives and prevent serious injuries.

Of the patients treated in 2019, about 36 percent were children younger than 15 years of age.

Highlighting that roughly a third of patients treated for firework-related injuries in 2019 were children under 15 underscores the inherent risks and potential dangers associated with firework use, particularly among our youngest population. This alarming figure serves as a powerful reminder for parents, guardians, educators, and lawmakers alike about the urgency of exercising caution, overseeing strict adult supervision, and promoting safety measures when utilizing fireworks. The statistic lends critical weight to the argument and bolsters the call for heightened awareness, responsible usage, and possibly further regulations to reduce firework-related injuries, especially among children.

Males represented 76% of the emergency department-treated, fireworks-related injuries in 2019.

Highlighting the statistic that ‘Males represented 76% of the emergency department-treated, fireworks-related injuries in 2019,’ spearheads an important discussion about gender trends in fireworks-related injuries. This factual revelation emphasizes how males may be disproportionately at risk, suggesting a deeper examination of behaviors, safety practices, and risk-awareness associated with fireworks usage. The statistic can be a powerful tool to spark interest and promote proactive safety measures, specifically targeting males who appear to be more susceptible to these types of injuries.

In 2018, hands and fingers were the body parts most often injured by fireworks (28 percent).

Highlighting the statistic that hands and fingers were the body parts most often injured by fireworks in 2018, accounting for 28 percent of all such injuries, underscores the compelling need for caution when using these festive yet hazardous items. By accentuating the risk posed to the very parts of our bodies vital for performing numerous daily tasks, this statistic potentially works as a preventative piece of information, emphasizing the importance of safety measures. It seeks to raise awareness of the very real injuries associated with improper fireworks handling— a crucial aspect to discuss in a blog post about Fireworks Injury Statistics.

Of the fireworks-related injuries sustained, 44% were to extremities and 34% were to the eye or other parts of the head in 2019.

In the vivid panorama of bursting colors and thunderous booms that mesmerizes us during firework displays, potential dangers are often overlooked. Illuminating this blind spot, the striking statistic depicts a sobering image: in 2019, 44% of firework-related injuries were inflicted on extremities, and 34% impacted the eye or other parts of the head. These numbers underscore the vital importance of comparatively mundane safety measures during these celebratory events and urge vigilance, not only in handling fireworks but also in protection of crucial body parts against the pretty but perilous splendor of pyrotechnics.

Firecrackers were the type of firework most often associated with injuries (18 percent).

Unveiling a rather alarming trend amid celebrations, the datum poignantly pinpoints firecrackers as the primary perpetrator in firework-related injuries, accounting for a significant 18 percent. In a blog post exploring Fireworks Injury Statistics, this pertinent aspect of danger underscores the necessity for increased vigilance around firecracker use. It serves as a call to action for heightened safety measures and user education to mitigate such casualties, creating a safer environment for firework enthusiasts.

The risk of fireworks injury was highest for young people ages 10-14, with more than twice the risk for the general population in 2018.

Shedding light upon a concerning trend, the fireworks injury statistic provides concrete evidence of an alarming reality: young individuals between the ages of 10-14 are more than twice as likely to sustain injuries from fireworks as the overall populace in 2018. This crucial piece of data serves as a proverbial siren, demonstrating the urgent need for policy transformations, strict regulations, awareness campaigns, and precautionary measures, particularly targeting this vulnerable age group. Through its revelation, this statistic breathes a new perspective into our blog post on Fireworks Injury Statistics, compelling readers to acknowledge and address this grave issue.

Fireworks caused an estimated 19,500 fires in 2018.

Grasping the sheer magnitude of fiery chaos unleashed by fireworks, as epitomized by the staggering figure of an estimated 19,500 fires in 2018 alone, offers a convincing testament to their potential for destruction. When examining Fireworks Injury Statistics, this alarming revelation feeds into a broader narrative of risk and safety concerns, underscoring the grave potential consequences of improper handling and use of these enticing yet dangerous devices. Fires, after all, are not just damaging to property but are a significant injury risk, making this statistic a crucial consideration in the comprehensive understanding of the overall harm fireworks can cause.

On average, 180 people go to the emergency room every day with fireworks-related injuries in the month around the July 4th holiday.

Highlighting the daily toll of 180 emergency room visits for fireworks-related injuries in the timeframe around July 4th injects a sobering dose of reality into our discussion on Fireworks Injury Statistics. It frames a thought-provoking context of celebration turned sour—a not-so-happy holiday for those injured—and prompts our readers to consider safe fireworks handling practices. This data serves as an icy splash of caution in the heat of festivities; it underscores the dangerous side of the beautiful, sparkling fun, and emphasizes the importance of proper precautions when using fireworks.

Sparklers were the number one cause of injuries, accounting for roughly one-quarter of emergency department visit.

In the vibrant world of pyrotechnics covered in our Fireworks Injury Statistics blog post, an unexpected protagonist emerges: the seemingly innocuous sparkler. These handheld light spectacles, often considered as the most benign party firework, surprisingly hold the dubious distinction of being the principal culprit of injuries, responsible for an approximate 25% share of emergency department visits. This striking insight underscores the importance of safety, even with ‘safer’ fireworks, revealing that danger often lurks where we least anticipate and demands a corresponding level of vigilance and caution.

Shell-and-mortar type fireworks were associated with the highest rates of emergency department-treated injuries.

In the riveting world of Fireworks Injury Statistics, the stark reality embedded in the data unfolds yet another gripping narrative, showcasing the potent danger of shell-and-mortar type fireworks. With these being associated with the highest rates of emergency department-treated injuries, they underscore the critical need for safety measures and regulations. The statistic serves as a cautionary tale, bringing to light the heightened risk factor these types of fireworks impose, thereby accentuating the paramount importance of vigilance and prevention in ensuring a safe, injury-free celebrations.

In 2018, fireworks were involved in an estimated 9,100 injuries that were treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments.

Brushing with the sheer numbers of the bristling flames, the statistic that revealed the involvement of fireworks in an astounding estimation of 9,100 injuries, necessitating treatment in US hospital emergency departments in 2018, paints a vivid picture of the potential danger lurking beneath the ephemeral beauty of fireworks. In the broader discourse of our blog post on Fireworks Injury Statistics, this figure, deceptively simple yet filled with potent implications, becomes an anchor point – a fiery beacon illuminating not just the immediate damages, but also the long-term consequences and healthcare burdens that such recreational pursuits can impose. Thus, this statistic underlines the critical importance of adopting safer practices, improving regulations and raising public awareness about the possible health hazards associated with the use of fireworks.

Twelve people died due to fireworks in 2019.

Highlighting the somber reality, the unavoidable truth that twelve lives were tragically extinguished due to fireworks in 2019 amplifies the urgency of understanding Fireworks Injury Statistics. An unfortunate testament to the dangerous side of these mesmerizing light displays, this figure reminds us that beyond the awe and admiration for a spectacular fireworks show, lies an indisputable risk, a potentially fatal hazard. It underlines the pressing need for greater awareness, safety measures and regulated use of fireworks, serving as a sobering wake-up call amidst the colorful cascades and spectacular skyward eruptions. The statistic thus complements the blog’s intention to educate about the paramount importance of valuing safety over spectacle.

About 900 emergency department-treated injuries were associated with sparklers and 400 with bottle rockets in 2019.

Taking into account the 2019 figures – with an astonishing 900 injuries resulting from sparklers and 400 from bottle rockets being severe enough to require emergency department treatment – offers an eye-opening perspective. While sparklers and bottle rockets may be perceived as harmless fun, these figures suggest otherwise, adding a compelling angle to any discussion on fireworks safety. A blog post on Fireworks Injury Statistics would not be complete without highlighting these statistics, as they underline the often-underestimated dangers and reaffirm the importance of safety measures when using even the most seemingly benign fireworks.

Fireworks cause an average of 4.5 death per year.

Highlighting the statistic that fireworks result in an average of 4.5 deaths per year serves as a sobering reality check in a blog post about Fireworks Injury Statistics. It underpins the potentially lethal risks associated with the seemingly merry tradition of fireworks displays. By underscoring the tragic fatalities, readers may be compelled to reflect on the seriousness of following safety guidelines and heighten their awareness about responsible fireworks usage. Furthermore, it demonstrates the importance of regulation in this area, providing context to not only the physical dangers but also the dire consequences of negligence. This poignant piece of data ensures we don’t gloss over the human cost of fireworks mishaps, ensuring the celebration of light and sound does not morph into an evening of disaster.

On Independence Day in a typical year, more U.S. fires are reported than on any other day, and fireworks account for more than half of those fires.

Marveling at the burst of splendid colors in a dark sky serves as an integral part of celebrating Independence Day. Yet, beneath the mesmerizing facade of these fiery spectacles lies an unnerving reality. A typical Independence Day sees the most reported U.S. fires, with more than half stemming from fireworks. In a blog post about Fireworks Injury Statistics, this kaleidoscope of risk paints a striking image. It underlines the visceral link between the bright sparks of celebration and a potential blaze, reminding readers of the capricious dance between delight and danger. It accentuates the need for caution during these splendid displays, driving the message that each festive crackle echoed in the midnight air may hold an ember of threat, potentially starring you in a statistic you never wished to be a part of.

Conclusion

Firework-related injuries represent fascinating yet unnerving data. It’s evident that although fireworks are synonymous with joy and celebration, they can pose significant risks if not handled properly. Statistics affirm that a sizable percentage of annual injuries, especially around holidays like the Fourth of July, can be attributed to fireworks mishaps. These figures reinforce the need for greater public awareness, stricter safety measures, and sensible use of fireworks to ensure that festivities remain safe, enjoyable, and free from preventable harm.

References

0. – https://www.rb.gy

FAQs

What is the most commonly injured body part due to fireworks?

According to the annual Fireworks Report by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, the hand and fingers are the most commonly injured body parts, followed by the head, face, and ears.

What is the percentage of fireworks injuries that require hospitalization?

It varies per year, but according to a 2019 report by the American Pyrotechnics Association, approximately 9% of fireworks injuries required hospitalization.

How many people are injured by fireworks each year in the United States?

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, there were an estimated 10,000 firework-related injuries treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments in 2019.

What percentage of fireworks injuries occur to children under the age of 15?

In the US, nearly 36% of individuals injured by fireworks are under the age of 15 as per the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Are certain types of fireworks more dangerous than others?

Yes, according to CPSC reports, firecrackers represent the largest proportion of total injuries, followed closely by sparklers which appear harmless but can reach temperatures of up to 2000 degrees Fahrenheit.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents