GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

U.S. Disability Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important U.S. Disability Statistics

  • Nearly 1 in 4 U.S. adults are living with a disability, according to the CDC.
  • About 13.7% of people with a disability in the U.S. have a mobility disability with serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs.
  • Approximately 10.8 million people, or 4.6% of the total population of United states have ambulatory disabilities.
  • Among adults age 65 and older, 2 in 5 have a disability.
  • 19.3% of people with a disability in the U.S were employed in 2019, compared to 66.3% of those without a disability.
  • Hearing loss is the third most common disability in the United States with about 15% of American adults report some trouble hearing.
  • About 21.7 million, or 10.8 percent, of all U.S. civilians with a disability have difficulty lifting or grasping.
  • Approximately 63% of disabled individuals in the U.S. who are capable of being employed remain jobless.
  • Vision-related disabilities affect approximately 1.3% of the U.S. population, amounting to around 3.4 million people.
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Understanding the landscape of disability in the United States is crucial for informing policies and services aimed at improving the quality of life and economic self-sufficiency of individuals with disabilities. In today’s blog post, we will delve deeply into U.S. Disability Statistics. We will examine the prevalence and different types of disabilities, their impact on employment and economic disparities, and how these trends have changed over time. This knowledge is pivotal for policymakers, researchers, and advocates committed to addressing the unique challenges faced by this significant but often overlooked population demographic.

The Latest U.S. Disability Statistics Unveiled

Nearly 1 in 4 U.S. adults are living with a disability, according to the CDC.

Painting a vivid picture of the prominence of disability in the U.S., the CDC underscores that almost a quarter of U.S. adults are navigating life with some form of disability. When incorporated into a blog post about U.S. Disability Statistics, this figure forms a critical cornerstone, serving as a startling revelation about the disability prevalence and magnifying the importance of focusing on accessibility, inclusion, and rights protection in our society. It underscores the urgency of proliferating knowledge about various disabilities, deconstructing stereotypes, and fostering more comprehensive accommodations and policies. Informed by this statistic, readers can better understand and advocate for the life quality improvements and societal resources so urgently required by this significant segment of the population.

About 13.7% of people with a disability in the U.S. have a mobility disability with serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs.

Shining a light on the approximately 13.7% of Americans with disabilities struggling with significant mobility impairments, such as the climbing of stairs or walking, presents an alarming picture of the hardships faced daily. This figure is integral to the wider dialogue on U.S. Disability Statistics as it underscores the urgency for ramped-up accessibility measures and infrastructure modifications. It serves as a testament to the need for improved medical intervention, enhanced disability rights laws, and a more inclusive societal mindset. It ultimately draws attention to a substantial subset of the population that needs to surmount formidable challenges just to partake in basic daily activities, an issue that demands recognition and action.

Approximately 10.8 million people, or 4.6% of the total population of United states have ambulatory disabilities.

In weaving the rich tapestry of U.S. Disability Statistics, the strand representing those with ambulatory disabilities is a striking one. Accounting for approximately 4.6% of the total population, this figure elucidates that 10.8 million souls battle with reduced mobility on a daily basis. This group constitutes a significant subset, underscoring the undeniable magnitude of the challenges faced by differently-abled individuals. The attention to this statistic deepens our understanding of the manifold aspects of disability and underscores the critical need for accessibility provisions, policy changes, and societal sensitization to enrich the lives of individuals with ambulatory disabilities.

Among adults age 65 and older, 2 in 5 have a disability.

Highlighting that 2 out of every 5 adults aged 65 and beyond are living with a disability underscores the rising prevalence of disability within our geriatric population, a demographic that is growing as modern medicine advances. In the narrative against U.S. Disability statistics, this fact serves as a potent reminder that as we climb the ladder of longevity, we inevitably face an increased possibility of disability, adding another dimension to our understanding of the aging process. It invites policy makers, healthcare professionals, and the community at large to create a more inclusive society that accounts for this demographic shift, be it in the realm of medical care, infrastructure, or social support systems.

19.3% of people with a disability in the U.S were employed in 2019, compared to 66.3% of those without a disability.

Such a sobering statistic illustrates the stark disparity in employment between those living with a disability and those not, in the U.S. in 2019. The figure sheds light on the critical issue of employment discrimination, highlighting that even though the Americans with Disabilities Act has made strides, ableism remains a deeply ingrained social concern. The gap of 47% points gravely towards the hurdles that disabled individuals face in their participation and inclusion in the workforce. This percentage is not only indicative of potential systemic barriers but provides a catalyst for conversation and change in employment policies and practices for disabled members of society. It serves as a call to action for lawmakers, organizations, and the general public alike to foster a more inclusive, equitable job market.

Hearing loss is the third most common disability in the United States with about 15% of American adults report some trouble hearing.

In a blog post delving into U.S. Disability Statistics, the reality that hearing loss is ranked as the third most prevalent disability provides a striking testament to the importance of initiatives aimed at auditory health. Capturing approximately 15% of American adults who self-report difficulty with hearing, it is a poignant reminder of this often overlooked issue that affects communication, quality of life, and professional opportunities. Whether advocating for better infrastructure, pushing for wider accessibility, or promoting technology advancements, this statistic elevates the urgent discourse needed to address the challenges confronting this significant population.

About 21.7 million, or 10.8 percent, of all U.S. civilians with a disability have difficulty lifting or grasping.

Shadowing the invisible struggle faced by many in America, the statistic that approximately 21.7 million, or 10.8 percent, of all U.S. civilians with a disability experience difficulties with lifting or grasping underscores the often unspoken complexities associated with physical disabilities. This information illuminates a key concern within the broad spectrum of U.S disability topics, demonstrating that a significant portion of disabled individuals face challenges performing simple tasks, consequently impacting their independence and quality of life. In illuminating this issue, we can promote better understanding, drive thoughtful conversation, and inspire more comprehensive policy-making and support services tailored to these specific needs within the disability community.

Approximately 63% of disabled individuals in the U.S. who are capable of being employed remain jobless.

Delving into the eerie reality of U.S. Disability Statistics, the perennial statistic revealing that around 63% of disabled individuals capable of employment remain jobless gnaws at the very core of the societal challenge we face. It isn’t just a number, rather, it is a profound testament to the discrimination, lack of accessibility and inclusive opportunities that this considerable group wrestles with on a day-to-day basis. As we dissect these figures and relate them to the forest of legislations, policies, and societal attitudes, we uncover the undeniable urgency and the critical need for concrete action that ensures a more inclusive, accessible, and non-discriminatory work landscape for disabled individuals.

Vision-related disabilities affect approximately 1.3% of the U.S. population, amounting to around 3.4 million people.

The statistics revealing that roughly 1.3% of the U.S. population, or about 3.4 million people, are affected by vision-related disabilities paints a vivid picture of the dimension of this specific impairment within overall American disability landscape. This insight is reflective of the diverse range of impacts that disabilities might have on individual lives and highlights the significance of understanding and addressing vision-related disabilities. In terms of policymakers and stakeholders, such a substantial figure provides a backdrop for assigning resources, formulating disability policies, and designing aids, demonstrating the urgency and necessity of inclusive solutions catering to this considerable segment of the population.

Conclusion

U.S. disability statistics offer critical insight into the prevalence of disability in the population, their employment status, financial conditions, and health issues. It provides a clear picture that further supports policymakers, healthcare professionals, service providers, and researchers to implement tailormade programs and initiatives. This progress strives to augment the inclusion and well-being of individuals with disabilities, ensuring their full participation in all societal aspects while highlighting the need for continuous advancements in accessibility, education, employment, and healthcare services.

References

0. – https://www.www.census.gov

1. – https://www.www.bls.gov

2. – https://www.www.nidcd.nih.gov

3. – https://www.www.afb.org

4. – https://www.www.statista.com

5. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

6. – https://www.www.disabled-world.com

FAQs

How many people in the U.S. have a disability?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, around 61 million adults in the United States live with a disability.

What percentage of the U.S. population is disabled?

About 26% (one in four) of adults in the United States have some type of disability.

What is the most common type of disability in the U.S?

The most common type of disability involves mobility, which affects 1 in 7 adults in the U.S.

How does the disability prevalence vary with age in the U.S.?

Disability prevalence increases with age. Two in five adults aged 65 and older have a disability compared to one in four adults aged 18-64.

What proportion of the U.S. population receives disability benefits?

According to the Social Security Administration, around 5% of the total U.S. population receives Social Security disability benefits as of 2020.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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