GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Pregnant Smoking Statistics: Market Report & Data

With sources from: nhs.uk, marchofdimes.org, aha.org, healthychildren.org and many more

Statistic 1

About 12% of pregnant women in the United States smoked cigarettes during pregnancy, according to data from 2016.

Statistic 2

Among pregnant smokers, 55% quit during pregnancy, and 40% of those relapse within 6 months after childbirth.

Statistic 3

Women who smoke during pregnancy are more likely (1.4 times) to have a stillborn baby.

Statistic 4

Secondhand smoke exposure in pregnant women can increase the risk of low birth weight by as much as 20%.

Statistic 5

Women who smoke during pregnancy are more likely to experience preterm delivery.

Statistic 6

Smoking while pregnant increases the chances of having a baby with a cleft lip and/or cleft palate by 30% - 50%.

Statistic 7

In 2018, nearly 8% of women reported that they smoked during their last 3 months of pregnancy.

Statistic 8

Smoking during pregnancy can increase the risk of sudden infant death syndrome by 1.5 times.

Statistic 9

Smoking in the first trimester of pregnancy increases the risk of congenital heart defects in babies by 20% - 70%.

Statistic 10

Women who smoke during pregnancy are at a 50% higher risk for placental abruption.

Statistic 11

Response to stress hormones is reduced by 15% in newborns of mothers who smoked during pregnancy.

Statistic 12

Almost 10% of pregnant women in the UK reported smoking at the time of delivery in 2019/20.

Statistic 13

Babies born to mothers who smoked during pregnancy are about 600 grams lighter on average than those born to non-smoking mothers.

Statistic 14

The rate of smoking during pregnancy is more than 2 times higher for women aged 20-24 than for women aged 40-44.

Statistic 15

16% of low-income pregnant women in the United States smoke cigarettes.

Statistic 16

An estimate of 5% of infant deaths can be attributed to maternal smoking during pregnancy.

Statistic 17

Up to 5% of preterm-related deaths, and up to 23% of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) related deaths can be attributed to maternal smoking during pregnancy.

Statistic 18

The likelihood for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) increases by 2.4 times in children if the mother smokes during pregnancy.

Statistic 19

More than 30% of pregnant smokers in USA reported using e-cigarettes in 2015.

Statistic 20

Women who stop smoking before or during the first 3-4 months of pregnancy reduce the risk of having a low birth weight baby to that of a non-smoker.

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In this post, we present a comprehensive overview of statistics related to smoking during pregnancy in the United States and the impact it has on maternal and infant health. These statistics shed light on the prevalence of smoking among pregnant women, the associated risks, and the outcomes for both mothers and their babies.

Statistic 1

"About 12% of pregnant women in the United States smoked cigarettes during pregnancy, according to data from 2016."

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Statistic 2

"Among pregnant smokers, 55% quit during pregnancy, and 40% of those relapse within 6 months after childbirth."

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Statistic 3

"Women who smoke during pregnancy are more likely (1.4 times) to have a stillborn baby."

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Statistic 4

"Secondhand smoke exposure in pregnant women can increase the risk of low birth weight by as much as 20%."

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Statistic 5

"Women who smoke during pregnancy are more likely to experience preterm delivery."

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Statistic 6

"Smoking while pregnant increases the chances of having a baby with a cleft lip and/or cleft palate by 30% - 50%."

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Statistic 7

"In 2018, nearly 8% of women reported that they smoked during their last 3 months of pregnancy."

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Statistic 8

"Smoking during pregnancy can increase the risk of sudden infant death syndrome by 1.5 times."

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Statistic 9

"Smoking in the first trimester of pregnancy increases the risk of congenital heart defects in babies by 20% - 70%."

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Statistic 10

"Women who smoke during pregnancy are at a 50% higher risk for placental abruption."

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Statistic 11

"Response to stress hormones is reduced by 15% in newborns of mothers who smoked during pregnancy."

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Statistic 12

"Almost 10% of pregnant women in the UK reported smoking at the time of delivery in 2019/20."

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Statistic 13

"Babies born to mothers who smoked during pregnancy are about 600 grams lighter on average than those born to non-smoking mothers."

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Statistic 14

"The rate of smoking during pregnancy is more than 2 times higher for women aged 20-24 than for women aged 40-44."

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Statistic 15

"16% of low-income pregnant women in the United States smoke cigarettes."

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Statistic 16

"An estimate of 5% of infant deaths can be attributed to maternal smoking during pregnancy."

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Statistic 17

"Up to 5% of preterm-related deaths, and up to 23% of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) related deaths can be attributed to maternal smoking during pregnancy."

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Statistic 18

"The likelihood for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) increases by 2.4 times in children if the mother smokes during pregnancy."

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Statistic 19

"More than 30% of pregnant smokers in USA reported using e-cigarettes in 2015."

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Statistic 20

"Women who stop smoking before or during the first 3-4 months of pregnancy reduce the risk of having a low birth weight baby to that of a non-smoker."

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Interpretation

The statistics presented emphasize the significant negative impact of smoking during pregnancy on both maternal and infant health outcomes. The high prevalence of pregnant women smoking, coupled with associated risks such as stillbirth, low birth weight, preterm delivery, birth defects, SIDS, and developmental disorders like ADHD, underscores the urgent need for effective smoking cessation interventions among expectant mothers. The data highlights the importance of public health efforts to reduce smoking rates during pregnancy and promote early cessation to improve birth outcomes and mitigate long-term health consequences for both mothers and infants.

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