GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Lithium-Ion Battery Fire Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Lithium-Ion Battery Fire Statistics

  • Lithium-ion batteries are involved in an estimated 65% of waste facility fires in California.
  • Lithium-ion batteries accounted for a 21% increase in waste and recycling fires reported in the United Kingdom in 2019.
  • 48% of cell phone fires are caused by lithium-ion batteries.
  • In 2020, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission reported an average of one battery fire every two days in the U.S.
  • 24% of EV fires were directly caused by battery packs which most are lithium-ion.
  • According to the FAA, there were 265 air/airport incidents involving lithium batteries carried as cargo or baggage recorded from March 20, 1991, to August 31, 2021.
  • On average, a lithium-ion battery fire has a Flame Heat Release (FHR) about 7 times higher than that of a typical internal combustion engine vehicle fire.
  • Lithium-ion batteries caused nearly 200 fires at recycling plants over a 12 month period in the US and Canada.
  • About 12% of lithium-ion battery fires are caused by mishandling or misuse of the batteries.
  • In France, lithium-ion batteries are the cause of 4 to 5 waste sorting center fires each year.
  • On average, each lithium-ion battery fire is estimated to cost a recycling facility about $113,000.
  • Every year, 1.5% of lithium-ion batteries are linked to overheating, explosion, or fire incidents.
  • 30% to 40% of lithium-ion battery fires are caused by external factors, such as short-circuit, overcharge, and over-discharge.
  • 38% of all lithium battery incidents were battery or device failures in 2021.
  • 70% of lithium-ion battery fires in electric vehicles occurred while the vehicle was in use or in motion.
  • There were more than 50 incidents related to lithium-ion battery fires in e-bikes and e-scooters in New York City in a span of 12 months ending June 2021.
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Navigating the compelling world of energy storage, this blog post delves into the comprehensive exploration of Lithium-Ion battery fire statistics. A pivotal technology powering numerous portable electronic devices, electric vehicles, and renewable energy platforms, Lithium-Ion batteries’ safety concerns have been front and center in recent years. Our detailed statistical analysis will unravel the frequency, causes, and preventative measures associated with Lithium-Ion battery fires, fostering better understanding and insight into this timely subject.

The Latest Lithium-Ion Battery Fire Statistics Unveiled

Lithium-ion batteries are involved in an estimated 65% of waste facility fires in California.

Highlighting the startling fact that Lithium-ion batteries contribute to around 65% of waste facility fires in California offers a clear enunciation of the scale of this alarming issue. In a blog post about Lithium-Ion Battery Fire Statistics, this particular detail becomes particularly impactful, cautioning readers about the potential fire hazards and environment-related implications. Providing such information in a Californian context can enable readers to fully understand the depth of the problem, thereby emphasizing the crucial need for improved disposal methods, enhanced safety protocols, and perhaps a more sustainable alternative to Lithium-ion batteries.

Lithium-ion batteries accounted for a 21% increase in waste and recycling fires reported in the United Kingdom in 2019.

Highlighting the escalating frequency of waste and recycling fires due to lithium-ion batteries, a 21% surge in the UK during 2019 warrants serious attention in our discussion about Lithium-Ion Battery Fire Statistics. The sharp rise underlines a pressing need for developing comprehensive disposal and recycling strategies or safer alternative technology. This also underscores the latent hazards these power cells pose in our garbage and recycling facilities, potentially risking human lives and the environment. As statistical insights unravel the severity of the issue, the data evokes a commitment to effective solutions and improved safety measures.

48% of cell phone fires are caused by lithium-ion batteries.

Highlighting the statistic that 48% of cell phone fires are ignited by lithium-ion batteries provides compelling evidence of a significant, yet underreported problem in our digital age for a blog post on Lithium-Ion Battery Fire Statistics. With the proliferation of electronic devices powered by lithium-ion batteries, such insights underline the urgency in addressing their safety. The gravity of this issue is further accentuated when put in context of potential risks and damages associated with such fires. The intention isn’t to stir needless panic, but to push for innovation towards safer alternatives, develop stricter quality control measures, and educate users about safe battery usage and disposal.

In 2020, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission reported an average of one battery fire every two days in the U.S.

Underscoring the near-ubiquitous usage of Lithium-Ion batteries in modern-day gadgets, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission’s 2020 report divulges a startling frequency of a battery fire every two days within the American territory. This persistent incidence of battery fires exposes the latent hazards associated with these commonplace power sources, spotlighting the necessity of safety measures, rigorous quality testing and sophisticated design modifications to abate such occurrences. Proving to be an ominous drumbeat, these statistics call for substantial discussions on the safety of Lithium-Ion batteries, pushing towards advancements that can ensure reliability without compromising safety.

24% of EV fires were directly caused by battery packs which most are lithium-ion.

The revelation that 24% of EV fires sprout directly from battery packs, predominantly lithium-ion, sets a compelling stage for enthusiasts, manufacturers, and policymakers to reconsider battery designs and safety protocols. Highlighting the extent of lithium-ion battery fires in electric vehicles paint a vivid picture in terms of safety, offering a challenging landscape to innovate safer energy storage technologies. Simultaneously, it underscores the gravity of the situation in the backdrop of the rapid rise in electric vehicle sales, making it a cornerstone statistic for all conversations related to lithium-ion battery fire safety.

According to the FAA, there were 265 air/airport incidents involving lithium batteries carried as cargo or baggage recorded from March 20, 1991, to August 31, 2021.

Lithium-Ion batteries, while essential in powering our modern-day devices, harbor a risk that’s silently lurking – the threat of potential fire outbreaks. A glean into the statistics presented by the FAA illuminates an alarming count of 265 recorded incidents involving lithium batteries at air/airports from March 20, 1991, to August 31, 2021. This data amplifies the urgency of understanding and addressing the fire hazard these energy storage units represent. Whether nestled in cargo or personal baggage, these unsung dangers have been responsible for numerous untoward incidents. Thus, in a discourse centered on Lithium-Ion Battery Fire Statistics, such compelling data offers an authoritative account that bolsters the gravity of the situation, pushing for proactive safety regulations and optimization of these high-demand power units.

On average, a lithium-ion battery fire has a Flame Heat Release (FHR) about 7 times higher than that of a typical internal combustion engine vehicle fire.

In the realm of Lithium-Ion Battery Fire Statistics, the propensity of a lithium-ion battery fire’s Flame Heat Release (FHR) to reach staggering heights — about seven times that of a conventional internal combustion engine vehicle fire — paints a thrilling, albeit alarming picture. This level of intensity is a reminder of the pivotal role of safety norms in the design and utilization of lithium-ion battery-powered devices. It further emphasizes the relevance of persistent research and advancements in technology to curtail these numbers while enhancing efficiency. In essence, this statistic lays bare the potency of lithium-ion battery fires, thus amplifying their potential risks and directing our focus towards sustainable solutions.

Lithium-ion batteries caused nearly 200 fires at recycling plants over a 12 month period in the US and Canada.

The compelling information – nearly 200 fires caused by Lithium-ion batteries at recycling plants within a year across the US and Canada — is a vivid reminder of the potential perils of mishandling this type of battery. It underscores the urgency and necessity of promoting proper disposal and handling practices in our ongoing conversation surrounding Lithium-ion battery fire statistics. It furthers the dialogue by underlying the frequency of such incidents, urging governmental bodies, environmental agencies, and the general public to step up collective efforts towards battery safety and effective recycling.

About 12% of lithium-ion battery fires are caused by mishandling or misuse of the batteries.

The statistic shedding light on almost 12% of lithium-ion battery fires resulting from mishandling or misuse places a powerful emphasis on user interaction with these energy sources. Amidst a sea of numerical data on lithium-ion battery malfunctions, this relatively high percentage punctuates a broader tapestry of narratives and interplays, underscoring the critical role individuals play in preventing such risks. Consequently, this fact should serve as a tangible reminder, an illustrative flame, fueling our conversation on safety precautions, user guidelines and responsible dealing with these batteries, in our quest to dim the blaze of lithium-ion battery fires.

In France, lithium-ion batteries are the cause of 4 to 5 waste sorting center fires each year.

Highlighting the statistic that in France, lithium-ion batteries instigate 4 to 5 waste sorting center fires each year, underscores the volatile propensities of these commonly used power cells. Intended for a blog post about Lithium-Ion Battery Fire Statistics, this information serves as an emphatic beacon shedding light on the inherent fire risks connected to improper disposal of such batteries. It postulates a crucial narrative coupling everyday consumer electronics with potential fire hazards, shaping a cogent exploration about the necessity for prudent disposal practices and firmer regulations to safeguard waste management centers and, by extension, the environment.

On average, each lithium-ion battery fire is estimated to cost a recycling facility about $113,000.

Highlighting the considerable cost of each lithium-ion battery fire at an estimated average of $113,000, provides a stark reflection of the financial burden in terms of safety risks and ensuing damage that recycling facilities have to deal with. This financial measure serves as a compelling indicator of the severity of lithium-ion battery fires within the recycling industry, underpinning the critical need for adequate safety measures, effective disposal procedures, and robust fire mitigation strategies. This single statistic embeds the high-stakes scenario surrounding lithium-ion battery recycling, driving home the economic side of the conversation which, when paired with the environmental and safety aspects, amplifies the urgency of addressing this issue.

Every year, 1.5% of lithium-ion batteries are linked to overheating, explosion, or fire incidents.

In the discourse on lithium-ion battery fire statistics, peeling back the layers of the numeric facade exposes an alarming reality. Annually, 1.5% of lithium-ion batteries are integral in incidents involving overheating, explosions, or fires. The trickle-effect of this percentage has intricate impacts, from individual safety concerns to broader environmental implications. This figure, although seemingly small, is a potent testament to the lurking danger in our electronics-rich lifestyle, thereby steering the conversation towards pressing issues such as safety measures, regulations, and manufacturing quality.

30% to 40% of lithium-ion battery fires are caused by external factors, such as short-circuit, overcharge, and over-discharge.

Unveiling a captivating statistic, a crisp read-through suggests that nearly one-third to almost half of all lithium-ion battery fires are ignited by external triggers, translating into short-circuits, overcharges, and over-discharges. This portrayal of a high-impact chunk on the panorama of Lithium-Ion Battery Fire Statistics illuminates the essence of vigilance on external elements that manage these power units, emphasizing the importance of conscientious design, manufacturing, handling, and maintenance. Indeed, addressing externally induced fires may effectively thwart a substantial number of future incidents, anchoring a safer, more reliable usage of lithium-ion batteries.

38% of all lithium battery incidents were battery or device failures in 2021.

Peeling back the layers of Lithium-Ion Battery Fire Statistics in 2021, the revelation that a significant 38% of all lithium battery incidents sprouted from battery or device failures unveils deep-seated ambiguities within the technology’s reliability. An interpretation of this critical number infuses the narrative with an urgency to refine design, manufacture, and quality control procedures, proactively addressing the clearly substantial room for improvement. Thus, this compelling statistic not just affirms the existence of an observable hitch in the lithium-ion battery industry, it also signals a clarion call for enhanced scrutiny, innovation, and safety measures.

70% of lithium-ion battery fires in electric vehicles occurred while the vehicle was in use or in motion.

Highlighting a noteworthy data point, we uncover that a substantial 70% of lithium-ion battery fires in electric vehicles are reported to occur while the vehicle is actively in use or in motion. This quantitative evidence considerably shapes our understanding and stimulates concerns regarding the potential risks associated with lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles (EVs). As the EV market continues to rapidly expand, understanding incidents of battery fires becomes vital not only for the safety of EV drivers but also for manufacturers’ research development, regulators’ directives, insurance companies’ policy, and emergency services’ training. This statistic indeed signals a call for continuous improvement and safety enhancement in the design and materials of lithium-ion batteries.

There were more than 50 incidents related to lithium-ion battery fires in e-bikes and e-scooters in New York City in a span of 12 months ending June 2021.

This particular statistic serves as a vivid illustration of the potential hazards associated with lithium-ion batteries in e-bikes and e-scooters. In a bustling metropolis like New York City, where such modes of transportation are becoming increasingly popular, this figure underscores the critical need for improved safety measures. Within the scope of a blog post centered on Lithium-Ion Battery Fire Statistics, this compelling slice of data not only elevates its timeliness but also emphasizes the pertinence of the topic for the readership, whether they are commuters relying on these devices or safety-conscious citizens.

Conclusion

In summary, the statistical analysis shows that while lithium-ion batteries are not inherently dangerous, mishandling can increase risks significantly. The majority of failures result in minor malfunctions, but the data reveals that a at least 1 in 10,000 units may result in serious fires if improperly used. As their use continues to increase in our technology-driven society, it is crucial to understand and adhere to appropriate safety measures in order to mitigate the risk of fires and improve overall safety in the use of these crucial energy storage devices.

References

0. – https://www.www.letsrecycle.com

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2. – https://www.www.researchgate.net

3. – https://www.www.iata.org

4. – https://www.www.recyclingtoday.com

5. – https://www.www.nfpa.org

6. – https://www.www.faa.gov

7. – https://www.www.waste360.com

8. – https://www.www.nbcnews.com

9. – https://www.www.rechargebatteries.org

10. – https://www.www.nature.com

11. – https://www.www.technologyreview.com

12. – https://www.www.nytimes.com

13. – https://www.www.advanceautoparts.com

14. – https://www.www.lemonde.fr

FAQs

What causes a lithium-ion battery to catch fire?

Lithium-ion batteries can catch fire due to thermal runaway, a chain reaction that leads to overheating and ultimately to a fire. This can be caused by overcharging, physical damage, short-circuiting, or manufacturer defects.

How common are lithium-ion battery fires?

While the exact occurrence rate is difficult to establish due to the lack of comprehensive accident reporting, lithium-ion battery fires are comparatively rare considering overall use. Fires usually only occur under extreme conditions or in the presence of manufacturing defects.

Are lithium-ion battery fires dangerous?

Yes, fires caused by lithium-ion batteries can be very dangerous. They are hard to extinguish and can produce toxic fumes. Additionally, the batteries can explode if the fire causes a rapid increase in temperature and pressure.

How can one prevent lithium-ion battery fires?

Safety measures to prevent lithium-ion battery fires include avoiding overcharging, not exposing the batteries to extreme temperatures, avoiding physical damage, and using batteries from reliable manufacturers. Batteries should also be safely disposed of when they reach their end of life.

Can a lithium-ion battery fire be extinguished with water?

In general, it's not recommended to use water to extinguish a lithium-ion battery fire as it can contribute to the release of more heat and possibly hydrogen gas. Dry chemicals, carbon dioxide, or foam are typically recommended by fire personnel, as they can cool the fire and prevent the spread.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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