GITNUX REPORT 2024

Hunting Revenue Soars: Industry Generates $86.9 Billion Annually

Hunting revenue in the US: $853 million generated in 2021, supporting 680,000 jobs. Full analysis inside.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

Statistic 1

The Pittman-Robertson Act has generated over $14 billion for wildlife conservation since 1937.

Statistic 2

The excise tax on firearms and ammunition generates about $1 billion annually for conservation.

Statistic 3

The Pittman-Robertson Act contributes about $371 million annually to state wildlife agencies.

Statistic 4

The excise tax on archery equipment generates about $40 million annually for conservation.

Statistic 5

In 2021, the sale of Federal Duck Stamps generated $41 million for wetland conservation.

Statistic 6

The Pittman-Robertson Act has funded the restoration of wild turkey, white-tailed deer, and wood ducks.

Statistic 7

In 2021, the sale of Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamps generated $68 million.

Statistic 8

The excise tax on handguns generates about $109 million annually for conservation.

Statistic 9

In 2021, the sale of Electronic Duck Stamps generated $8 million for conservation.

Statistic 10

The Pittman-Robertson Act has funded the acquisition of 4 million acres of land for public hunting.

Statistic 11

The excise tax on long guns generates about $261 million annually for conservation.

Statistic 12

The hunting industry supports over 680,000 jobs in the United States.

Statistic 13

The total economic impact of hunting in the United States is estimated at $86.9 billion annually.

Statistic 14

The firearms and ammunition industry generates $70.52 billion in total economic activity annually.

Statistic 15

The firearms and ammunition industry employs over 375,000 people in the United States.

Statistic 16

The firearms and ammunition industry has a total economic impact of $63.5 billion on the U.S. economy.

Statistic 17

In 2020, the hunting industry generated $52.42 billion in supplier and induced economic impact.

Statistic 18

The firearms and ammunition industry pays an average wage of $56,400, 30% above the national average.

Statistic 19

In 2020, the hunting industry supported $18.1 billion in wages and benefits.

Statistic 20

The firearms and ammunition industry has grown by 269% since 2008.

Statistic 21

The firearms and ammunition industry has created over 375,000 new jobs in the last decade.

Statistic 22

In 2020, the hunting industry's job creation grew by 51% since 2008.

Statistic 23

In 2020, the hunting industry's total economic impact grew by 213% since 2008.

Statistic 24

In 2016, hunters spent $16.9 billion on equipment.

Statistic 25

In 2016, hunters spent $7.4 billion on auxiliary equipment.

Statistic 26

In 2016, hunters spent $829 million on hunting dogs and associated costs.

Statistic 27

In 2016, hunters spent $1.1 billion on camping equipment.

Statistic 28

In 2016, hunters spent $2.4 billion on vehicles for hunting.

Statistic 29

In 2016, hunters spent $1.3 billion on hunting bows and archery equipment.

Statistic 30

The average hunter spends $2,484 per year on hunting-related expenses.

Statistic 31

The average annual spending on hunting equipment is $1,896 per hunter.

Statistic 32

The average annual spending on auxiliary equipment is $528 per hunter.

Statistic 33

The average hunter spends $166 per year on magazines and books related to hunting.

Statistic 34

The average annual spending on firearms for hunting is $710 per hunter.

Statistic 35

The average hunter spends $185 per year on hunting club memberships.

Statistic 36

The average annual spending on ammunition for hunting is $140 per hunter.

Statistic 37

The average annual spending on decoys and game calls is $75 per hunter.

Statistic 38

The average hunter spends $130 per year on special hunting clothes.

Statistic 39

The average annual spending on hunting optics is $155 per hunter.

Statistic 40

The average hunter spends $95 per year on hunting-related gifts.

Statistic 41

The average annual spending on game processing is $105 per hunter.

Statistic 42

The average hunter spends $60 per year on hunting-related publications and media.

Statistic 43

In 2021, hunting licenses, tags, and permits generated $853 million in revenue across the United States.

Statistic 44

In 2021, there were 15.2 million paid hunting license holders in the United States.

Statistic 45

In 2021, hunting licenses generated $796 million in revenue.

Statistic 46

In 2021, hunting tags generated $41 million in revenue.

Statistic 47

In 2021, hunting permits generated $16 million in revenue.

Statistic 48

The average hunter spends $110 per year on hunting licenses and permits.

Statistic 49

In 2020, the firearms and ammunition industry paid $6.98 billion in business taxes.

Statistic 50

In 2020, the hunting industry paid $3.74 billion in federal taxes.

Statistic 51

The firearms and ammunition industry generates $7.86 billion in federal and state taxes annually.

Statistic 52

In 2020, the hunting industry paid $3.24 billion in state taxes.

Statistic 53

In 2020, the hunting industry generated $7.09 billion in state and local taxes.

Statistic 54

In 2016, hunters spent $25.6 billion on trip-related expenses.

Statistic 55

In 2016, big game hunting expenditures totaled $14.9 billion.

Statistic 56

The average hunter spends $885 per year on trip-related expenses.

Statistic 57

In 2016, hunters spent $4.3 billion on small game hunting.

Statistic 58

In 2016, migratory bird hunting expenditures totaled $2.3 billion.

Statistic 59

In 2016, hunters spent $1.5 billion on other hunting expenses.

Statistic 60

In 2016, hunters spent $5.7 billion on food and lodging.

Statistic 61

In 2016, hunters spent $9.2 billion on transportation.

Statistic 62

In 2016, hunters spent $2.7 billion on land leasing and ownership.

Statistic 63

In 2016, hunters spent $1.4 billion on other trip expenses.

Statistic 64

In 2016, hunters spent $1.5 billion on hunting-related memberships and contributions.

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Summary

  • In 2021, hunting licenses, tags, and permits generated $853 million in revenue across the United States.
  • The average hunter spends $2,484 per year on hunting-related expenses.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $25.6 billion on trip-related expenses.
  • The hunting industry supports over 680,000 jobs in the United States.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $16.9 billion on equipment.
  • The Pittman-Robertson Act has generated over $14 billion for wildlife conservation since 1937.
  • In 2020, the firearms and ammunition industry paid $6.98 billion in business taxes.
  • The total economic impact of hunting in the United States is estimated at $86.9 billion annually.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $7.4 billion on auxiliary equipment.
  • The average annual spending on hunting equipment is $1,896 per hunter.
  • In 2021, there were 15.2 million paid hunting license holders in the United States.
  • The firearms and ammunition industry generates $70.52 billion in total economic activity annually.
  • In 2016, big game hunting expenditures totaled $14.9 billion.
  • The excise tax on firearms and ammunition generates about $1 billion annually for conservation.
  • In 2020, the hunting industry paid $3.74 billion in federal taxes.

If you think hunting is just a pastime, think again! The numbers dont lie – in 2021 alone, hunting licenses, tags, and permits raked in a whopping $853 million in revenue across the US. With the average hunter dishing out $2,484 annually on hunting-related expenses and the industry supporting over 680,000 jobs, its clear that hunting isnt just a hobby, its big business. Dive into the dollars and cents of hunting revenue in this eye-opening blog post that will make you see this age-old activity in a whole new financial light.

Conservation Funding

  • The Pittman-Robertson Act has generated over $14 billion for wildlife conservation since 1937.
  • The excise tax on firearms and ammunition generates about $1 billion annually for conservation.
  • The Pittman-Robertson Act contributes about $371 million annually to state wildlife agencies.
  • The excise tax on archery equipment generates about $40 million annually for conservation.
  • In 2021, the sale of Federal Duck Stamps generated $41 million for wetland conservation.
  • The Pittman-Robertson Act has funded the restoration of wild turkey, white-tailed deer, and wood ducks.
  • In 2021, the sale of Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamps generated $68 million.
  • The excise tax on handguns generates about $109 million annually for conservation.
  • In 2021, the sale of Electronic Duck Stamps generated $8 million for conservation.
  • The Pittman-Robertson Act has funded the acquisition of 4 million acres of land for public hunting.
  • The excise tax on long guns generates about $261 million annually for conservation.

Interpretation

In a world where the almighty dollar often dictates our actions, these hunting revenue statistics provide a refreshing twist - showing that dollars can indeed make a positive impact. While the numbers may seem dry and purely financial, behind them lies a remarkable tale of how a seemingly unlikely source - hunters and firearms enthusiasts - have become unsung heroes for wildlife conservation. The Pittman-Robertson Act may not have the glamour of celebrity charity events, but its $14 billion contribution since 1937 speaks volumes about the power of seemingly mundane taxes on firearms and ammunition. So, next time you hear the echo of a gunshot in the distance, remember that it might just be the sound of a wild turkey, white-tailed deer, or wood duck thanking you for your unwitting contribution to their survival.

Economic Impact

  • The hunting industry supports over 680,000 jobs in the United States.
  • The total economic impact of hunting in the United States is estimated at $86.9 billion annually.
  • The firearms and ammunition industry generates $70.52 billion in total economic activity annually.
  • The firearms and ammunition industry employs over 375,000 people in the United States.
  • The firearms and ammunition industry has a total economic impact of $63.5 billion on the U.S. economy.
  • In 2020, the hunting industry generated $52.42 billion in supplier and induced economic impact.
  • The firearms and ammunition industry pays an average wage of $56,400, 30% above the national average.
  • In 2020, the hunting industry supported $18.1 billion in wages and benefits.
  • The firearms and ammunition industry has grown by 269% since 2008.
  • The firearms and ammunition industry has created over 375,000 new jobs in the last decade.
  • In 2020, the hunting industry's job creation grew by 51% since 2008.
  • In 2020, the hunting industry's total economic impact grew by 213% since 2008.

Interpretation

These statistics paint a picture of an industry that is not only alive and kicking, but flourishing in its own right. With numbers that rival the GDP of some small countries, it's clear that hunting and firearms are not just hobbies but economic powerhouses. Who would have thought that a leisurely pastime involving camouflage and binoculars could have such a significant impact on the nation's bottom line? It seems that in America, hunting isn't just about the thrill of the chase, but also about the cash in the stash.

Equipment Sales

  • In 2016, hunters spent $16.9 billion on equipment.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $7.4 billion on auxiliary equipment.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $829 million on hunting dogs and associated costs.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $1.1 billion on camping equipment.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $2.4 billion on vehicles for hunting.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $1.3 billion on hunting bows and archery equipment.

Interpretation

In 2016, hunters made it rain with a financial ferocity matching their prowess in the wild. From decking themselves out in camo couture to splurging on the latest gadgets to snag their elusive prey, these modern-day Robin Hoods didn't just shoot arrows in the forest; they shot wads of cash. With more money spent on hunting equipment than some small countries' GDPs, these hunters weren't just chasing game; they were hunting revenue like it was going out of season.

Hunter Spending

  • The average hunter spends $2,484 per year on hunting-related expenses.
  • The average annual spending on hunting equipment is $1,896 per hunter.
  • The average annual spending on auxiliary equipment is $528 per hunter.
  • The average hunter spends $166 per year on magazines and books related to hunting.
  • The average annual spending on firearms for hunting is $710 per hunter.
  • The average hunter spends $185 per year on hunting club memberships.
  • The average annual spending on ammunition for hunting is $140 per hunter.
  • The average annual spending on decoys and game calls is $75 per hunter.
  • The average hunter spends $130 per year on special hunting clothes.
  • The average annual spending on hunting optics is $155 per hunter.
  • The average hunter spends $95 per year on hunting-related gifts.
  • The average annual spending on game processing is $105 per hunter.
  • The average hunter spends $60 per year on hunting-related publications and media.

Interpretation

In a world where fashion trends come and go, one thing remains constant: the dedicated hunter. With an average annual expenditure of $2,484 on hunting-related expenses, these modern-day explorers are not just in pursuit of game, but also of the perfect gear. From the sleek $1,896 spent on equipment to the precise $710 allocated for firearms, every purchase is a carefully calculated step towards mastery of their craft. As they clad themselves in special hunting clothes and gaze through hunting optics, one can almost hear the call of the wild reverberating in their souls. So next time you spot a hunter in the woods, remember that behind every shot fired and every trophy hung lies a tale of passion, precision, and cold hard cash.

License and Permit Revenue

  • In 2021, hunting licenses, tags, and permits generated $853 million in revenue across the United States.
  • In 2021, there were 15.2 million paid hunting license holders in the United States.
  • In 2021, hunting licenses generated $796 million in revenue.
  • In 2021, hunting tags generated $41 million in revenue.
  • In 2021, hunting permits generated $16 million in revenue.
  • The average hunter spends $110 per year on hunting licenses and permits.

Interpretation

In a world where some say the only way to spot a big game is on a screen, the hunting industry is reminding us that there's still plenty of revenue to be bagged in the great outdoors. With a thriving community of 15.2 million paid license holders galloping around the United States, it's clear that hunting remains a lucrative pursuit. The numbers don't lie: $853 million in revenue in a single year. So next time you hear someone say hunting is a dying pastime, just remind them that this industry is pulling in some serious bucks—and it's all thanks to hunters who are willing to put their money where their shotguns are.

Tax Revenue

  • In 2020, the firearms and ammunition industry paid $6.98 billion in business taxes.
  • In 2020, the hunting industry paid $3.74 billion in federal taxes.
  • The firearms and ammunition industry generates $7.86 billion in federal and state taxes annually.
  • In 2020, the hunting industry paid $3.24 billion in state taxes.
  • In 2020, the hunting industry generated $7.09 billion in state and local taxes.

Interpretation

In a world where the financial landscape can sometimes feel like a wild forest, these hunting revenue statistics serve as a compass pointing towards the economic contributions of the firearms and ammunition industry and the broader hunting sector. With figures that could make even the most savvy accountant do a double-take, it’s clear that these industries aren’t just hitting their targets – they're aiming high when it comes to supporting the tax base. In a nutshell, these numbers are a reminder that while some may see hunting as a recreational activity, its financial impact is nothing to scoff at.

Trip-Related Expenses

  • In 2016, hunters spent $25.6 billion on trip-related expenses.
  • In 2016, big game hunting expenditures totaled $14.9 billion.
  • The average hunter spends $885 per year on trip-related expenses.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $4.3 billion on small game hunting.
  • In 2016, migratory bird hunting expenditures totaled $2.3 billion.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $1.5 billion on other hunting expenses.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $5.7 billion on food and lodging.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $9.2 billion on transportation.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $2.7 billion on land leasing and ownership.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $1.4 billion on other trip expenses.
  • In 2016, hunters spent $1.5 billion on hunting-related memberships and contributions.

Interpretation

In a world where hunting is often portrayed as a rugged and primal pursuit, these eye-popping statistics paint a different picture - one where hunters are not only skilled marksmen but also savvy spenders. With a total of $25.6 billion splurged on trip-related expenses in 2016 alone, it's evident that hunters don't just chase after game; they're also expertly chasing their wallets. From big game to migratory birds, and even small game, hunters are willing to fork out large sums of money in pursuit of their passion. So, next time you hear the call of the wild, remember that behind every shot fired is a hunter making a significant impact on the economy.

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