GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Evangelism Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Evangelism Statistics

  • 47% of practicing Christian Millennials believe evangelism in today's society is wrong.
  • As per a study by Barna Group, 64% of born again Christians accepted Jesus Christ as their Savior before turning 18.
  • Southern Baptist churches spend roughly 2% of their annual budgets on evangelism.
  • About 155,000 people globally die daily, many without knowing Jesus Christ, according to Evangelism Explosion.
  • Approximately 76% of church goers state that personal evangelism is significant, as per LifeWay Research.
  • About two-thirds of Americans agree that Jesus died and came back to life, a core belief in evangelism.
  • Surprisingly, 47% of U.S adults who classify themselves as "Born Again Christians" cannot correctly define the Great Commission.
  • Evangelism explosion's training has been done in more than 230 countries.
  • Fewer than half of Christian Millennials feel they know how to respond when someone raises questions about faith.
  • 97% of evangelicals believe they should share Jesus with their friends.
  • Worldwide, evangelical Protestants increased from an estimated 98.2 million in 1970 to more than 300 million in 2010.
  • About 63% of evangelicals talk about spiritual matters in a typical week.
  • 96% of senior pastors believe churches have a responsibility to encourage members to evangelize.
  • In 2010, 13.1% of all Christians were Evangelicals, while 0.8% were non-Evangelicals.
  • More than one in four Christians (26%) are Evangelical Protestants.
  • 28% of Evangelicals strongly agree that there is only one true way to interpret the teachings of their religion.
  • A survey revealed that Americans with Evangelical beliefs have a surprising openness to hear about other faiths (79%).
  • In 2012, only 17% of Americans considered themselves evangelical. However, in 2017, 25% identified as evangelical.
  • Globally, Evangelicals make up around 25% of all Christians, according to Pew Research.

Table of Contents

Evangelism, the act of spreading the message of Christianity, is a pivotal component of many religious communities worldwide. In this age of rapid data collection and analysis, it’s crucial to comprehend how this practice is maturing and evolving from a statistical standpoint. This blog will delve into the latest trends and patterns around Evangelism: the demographic changes, methodologies and regional influences, and the impact on church growth, engagement, and community outreach. Welcome to a comprehensive exploration of Evangelism Statistics.

The Latest Evangelism Statistics Unveiled

47% of practicing Christian Millennials believe evangelism in today’s society is wrong.

Peering into a multi-dimensional aspect of evangelism, an insightful statistic reveals that almost half, notably 47%, of practicing Christian millennials consider evangelism in contemporary society as inappropriate. This statistic is a crucial juncture for the conversation on Evangelism, especially in the context of age demographics, hinting at a potential generational change in attitudes. It comes as a stark illustration of a possible orientation shift within a traditionally evangelistic group, painting a thought-provoking narrative of evolving perceptions among younger Christians, and hinting at a profound impact on the future of evangelism as it navigates social acceptance amidst changing times. This means the evangelism landscape is evolving, with implications for both the church’s outreach strategies and the wider societal dialogue regarding faith and religion.

As per a study by Barna Group, 64% of born again Christians accepted Jesus Christ as their Savior before turning 18.

In the vibrant tapestry of Evangelism Statistics, the intriguing data point featuring the Barna Group’s discovery that 64% of born-again Christians embraced Jesus Christ as their Savior prior to turning 18 works as an illuminating thread. This statistic not only underscores the profound influence of formative years but also challenges evangelistic ministries to realign their focuses towards younger audiences. Thus, any strategy aiming at expanding Christian values cannot afford to overlook this significant demographic, positioning youth evangelism as a pivotal component in planting spiritual seeds that bloom well into adulthood.

Southern Baptist churches spend roughly 2% of their annual budgets on evangelism.

Interpreting the allocation of Southern Baptist churches’ annual budgets can provide a unique perspective on their priorities and commitment to evangelism. When considering that a mere two percent is designated for evangelism, it becomes an intriguing discussion point in the spectrum of evangelism statistics. This figure paves the way for questioning whether it reflects a proportional emphasis on outreach efforts among these congregations. For readers tracing the financial footprints of faith communities towards their missions, this statistic serves as a pivotal checkpoint enabling them to understand the value that such an influential religious group puts on spreading its beliefs.

About 155,000 people globally die daily, many without knowing Jesus Christ, according to Evangelism Explosion.

In the vast landscape of evangelism, the statistic of approximately 155,000 people globally departing this world daily, a significant number being unfamiliar with Jesus Christ, paints a sobering reality. Undeniably, the figures not only evoke urgency among evangelists to escalate their mission, but also illuminate the colossal potential that resides within the sphere of evangelism. This pressing number serves as both a yardstick for measuring progress and a compass guiding the footsteps of those dedicated to spreading the teachings of Jesus, in their unwavering quest to leave no soul untouched.

Approximately 76% of church goers state that personal evangelism is significant, as per LifeWay Research.

Unveiling a profound revelation, the stated statistic by LifeWay Research reveals a considerable percentage – roughly 76%, of churchgoers acknowledging the importance of personal evangelism. Within the landscape of a blog post discussing Evangelism Statistics, this vital data not only presents the prevailing attitudes of those attending church towards sharing their faith, but also underscores the substantial role personal testimony plays in religious discourse and propagation. It furthermore highlights an interesting dynamic of religious commitment and the responsibility many feel towards spreading their beliefs, thereby adding considerable weight and depth to the discussion.

About two-thirds of Americans agree that Jesus died and came back to life, a core belief in evangelism.

Using the intriguing fact that ‘about two-thirds of Americans consent to the notion that Jesus died and resurrected to life’, crucially enriches our understanding in a blog post discussing Evangelism Statistics. This key insight offers a strong representation of the shared faith in Evangelical beliefs among the American populace, providing an indispensable backdrop for further discussions regarding acceptance, persistence, or alterations in Evangelism. More significantly, it functions as a compelling barometer of religious attitudes, helping to decipher the complexity of religious affiliations, convictions, and the cultural dialogue surrounding Evangelism in the USA.

Surprisingly, 47% of U.S adults who classify themselves as “Born Again Christians” cannot correctly define the Great Commission.

Delving into evangelism statistics, one disconcerting revelation stands out – nearly half of U.S. adults identifying as “Born Again Christians” are baffled by the concept of the Great Commission. This finding is significant in the discourse on evangelism as it examines the comprehension and perception of faith among followers. A clear understanding of the Great Commission – the biblical mandate to spread Christianity worldwide – forms the bedrock of evangelism. Hence, this statistic not only underscores a critical knowledge gap hampering evangelistic efforts but also prompts a much-needed dialogue about faith education within this influential religious demographic.

Evangelism explosion’s training has been done in more than 230 countries.

Highlighted in the dramatic stretch of Evangelism Explosion’s training across more than 230 countries, lies the testament to the pervasive grasp and global scale of Christian evangelism. In the narrative of evangelism statistics, this intriguing fact accentuates the geographic reach, penetration, and perhaps the influence of Christian leadership training, underlining the widespread acceptance of these teachings. Through this number, readers can glean how evangelism is not just a local or regional phenomenon but a global movement – a thread that interweaves diverse cultures, societies, and nations under a shared belief system.

Fewer than half of Christian Millennials feel they know how to respond when someone raises questions about faith.

In a landscape of rapidly shifting religious dynamics underscored by an omnipresent digital culture, ‘Fewer than half of Christian Millennials feel they know how to respond when someone raises questions about faith’ offers a critical insight on evangelism effectiveness. This statistic is a watershed revelation in the examination of evangelism techniques and their resonance with the current generation. It outlines a potential disconnect between traditional methods of faith communication and the millennial’s approach to discourse. Essentially, this data exposes a critical need for transformative strategies in evangelism that resonate with the information-age demographic, encompassing both the content of the message and the modality of its delivery. Crucially, it stands as a clarion call for a church that must contend with a more inquisitive and, oftentimes, skeptical generation. As such, the statistic becomes a formidable springboard to more targeted and effective faith dialogue strategies.

97% of evangelicals believe they should share Jesus with their friends.

Piercing through the heart of Evangelism Studies, we discover a remarkable statistic – ‘97% of evangelicals believe they should share Jesus with their friends.’ This figure serves as a compelling testament to the deep-rooted conviction and mission that threads through the fabric of evangelical communities. It gives credence to their aspiration of fostering greater religious understanding among their circles. Furthermore, crafting a sense of shared belief, this statistic underscores the profound effect of friendship networks in religious propagation, making it a captivating discussion point for any blog post delving into Evangelism Statistics.

Worldwide, evangelical Protestants increased from an estimated 98.2 million in 1970 to more than 300 million in 2010.

In the landscape of evangelical statistics, a transformative trend has surfaced illustrating the impressive growth of the evangelical Protestant community. From 1970 to 2010, there has been a monumental surge from an estimated 98.2 million adherents to a staggering 300 million worldwide. This not only signifies a threefold increase, vividly portraying burgeoning influence and expanding reach, but also underscores a powerful narrative of growing religious engagement. This influential shift undoubtedly paints a vivid picture of the evolving dynamics in worldwide religious demographics, highlighting the rising prominence of evangelical Protestantism, and sets the stage for the subsequent discussion in our blog post on evangelism statistics.

About 63% of evangelicals talk about spiritual matters in a typical week.

Reflecting on the statistic ‘About 63% of evangelicals discuss spiritual matters in a typical week’ provides key insight into the frequency and the fervency with which evangelicals engage in spiritual dialogue. It hints at the integral role that faith-based conversations play in the life of evangelicals, as more than half of them regularly partake in such discussions. This is a vital pulse check in understanding the evangelism landscape while examining their dedication towards sharing and embodying faith in their everyday life. Thus, this statistic brings to light the evangelical commitment to their religious ideologies and gives context to the spread and influence of their beliefs in a broader social environment in a piece about Evangelism Statistics.

96% of senior pastors believe churches have a responsibility to encourage members to evangelize.

Highlighting that a whopping 96% of senior pastors advocate for churches to inspire congregants to evangelize serves as a powerful testament to the significance of evangelism within church communities. It underscores a virtually unanimous agreement among pastoral leaders on the importance of evangelism, which itself can be a catalyst for stirring increased action and focus on evangelistic efforts among church members. As such, in a blog post uncovering evangelism statistics, this particular data point provides a compelling insight into the leadership mindset and potential influence on church activities around evangelism.

In 2010, 13.1% of all Christians were Evangelicals, while 0.8% were non-Evangelicals.

Grasping the significance of the datum that, in 2010, Evangelicals constituted 13.1% of all Christians, with non-Evangelicals only making up 0.8%, is like unlocking the door to a deeper understanding of the global Evangelical movement. Within the confines of a blog post on Evangelism Statistics, this piece of data throws a spotlight on the profound presence and impact of Evangelicals within the panorama of Christianity. It paints an evocative picture of a considerable tilt towards Evangelicalism, igniting a conversation around its causes, implications, and future development.

More than one in four Christians (26%) are Evangelical Protestants.

In sifting through the fascinating multitudes of Evangelism Statistics, the particularly compelling figure that a notable 26% of Christians identify as Evangelical Protestants underscores the substantial influence and reach of this religious movement. This percentage isn’t just an abstract number; instead, it illuminates the significant role that Evangelical Protestantism plays within the broader Christian community, influencing its doctrine, culture, and global impact. For those exploring Evangelism, understanding and appreciating this statistic offers profound insights, serving as a vibrant discussion point around the popularity, growth, and socio-religious weight of Evangelical Protestantism in the diverse tapestry of global Christianity.

28% of Evangelicals strongly agree that there is only one true way to interpret the teachings of their religion.

Unraveling the threads of Evangelical belief, the data point that reveals ‘28% of Evangelicals strongly agree there is only one true way to interpret the teachings of their religion’ adds a critical dimension to the narrative of Evangelism Statistics. This intriguing figure not only opens a window into the ideological diversity within the Evangelical community, it also underlines a surprising plurality of thought around religious interpretation. It hints at potentially rich debates and discussions within this significant faith group, providing readers a nuanced understanding of Evangelical behavior, faith, and decision-making. It simultaneously breaks down monolithic assumptions, sparking curiosity as it invites further exploration into why the larger percentage perhaps holds more malleable or varied interpretative viewpoints.

A survey revealed that Americans with Evangelical beliefs have a surprising openness to hear about other faiths (79%).

The revelation from a survey that 79% of Americans with Evangelical beliefs are surprisingly open to hearing about other faiths provides a captivating insight for an article about Evangelism Statistics. Not only does it challenge preconceptions about religious exclusivity within Evangelical circles, but it also opens up new discussions regarding religious tolerance, interfaith dialogues and the potential shifts in traditional Evangelical practices. This unexpected openness could be a stepping stone towards fostering increased understanding and respect among diverse faith groups, making it a remarkable point of consideration in the Evangelism landscape.

In 2012, only 17% of Americans considered themselves evangelical. However, in 2017, 25% identified as evangelical.

The subtle shift, as depicted by the numbers from 2012 to 2017, presents a revelatory narrative within the realm of American religious landscape, particularly illuminating the expanding influence of evangelism. This intriguing statistic underscores an approximately 8% surge in individuals who identify themselves as evangelicals within a five-year span. For a blog post dedicated to evangelism statistics, this transformation is not just a numerical change but a potent marker of religious realignment and a testimony to the growing footprint of evangelism on the socio-cultural map of America, opening up a spate of new discussions, speculations, and further research around its evolving dynamics.

Globally, Evangelicals make up around 25% of all Christians, according to Pew Research.

Peeling back the layers of globally-practiced Christianity in our blog post about Evangelism Statistics, an intriguing facet emerges from Pew Research – an impressive 25% of all Christians worldwide identify as Evangelicals. This not only underscores the substantial presence and dispersion of Evangelicals across the globe, but also offers a statistical lens to appreciate the extent of the influence of Evangelical denominations in shaping the spiritual, social, and political landscapes in various societies. Moreover, it provides a framework for understanding the breadth of Evangelism’s reach, key for contextual discussions on its growth drivers, challenges, and future trends.

Conclusion

Evaluating the provided Evangelism Statistics gives us insightful information about the status and trends in religious evangelism worldwide. From examination, it is evident that demographics, cultural backgrounds, societal influences and personal beliefs significantly impact the prevalence and methods of evangelism. These statistics emphasize the importance of research in understanding the nuances and evolution of religious evangelism, helping develop effective strategies for those interested in spreading religious messages, while also keeping in line with the respect for increasing religious diversity.

References

0. – https://www.www.barna.com

1. – https://www.lifewayresearch.com

2. – https://www.www.lifeway.com

3. – https://www.www.pewresearch.org

4. – https://www.evangelismexplosion.org

5. – https://www.www.pewforum.org

6. – https://www.factsandtrends.net

FAQs

What percentage of the worldwide Christian population participates in evangelism?

It is difficult to determine an exact percentage due to varying definitions of participation and lack of comprehensive global data. However, research from the Center for the Study of Global Christianity suggests that approximately 13% to 25% of Christians worldwide can be considered evangelicals, many of whom likely participate in evangelism.

Are younger individuals more likely to engage in evangelism than older individuals?

Recent studies suggest a decrease in religious participation among younger generations, particularly in Western countries. This might suggest a lower likelihood of evangelism participation among younger individuals. However, engagement may vary significantly by location, cultural background, and personal beliefs.

What is the primary demographic that evangelicals tend to target?

The demographics targeted can vary widely depending on the goals and culture of the particular evangelistic group. However, some common demographics targeted by evangelistic efforts include youth, families, and individuals in developing nations.

Is the number of people participating in evangelism increasing or decreasing?

There is no definitive global answer to this question, as trends vary by region. In Western nations like the U.S., studies indicate a modest decrease in religious affiliation and participation, which could affect evangelism. Conversely, in parts of Africa and Asia, Christianity and evangelism are reported to be growing.

Do certain continents or regions have higher percentages of evangelicals?

Yes, according to the Center for the Study of Global Christianity, Africa had the highest percentage of evangelicals as of the mid-2010s, followed by North America, Asia, and Latin America. Europe has a lower percentage of evangelicals, and the percentage is lowest in the Middle East and North Africa.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents