GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

College Majors By Gender Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important College Majors By Gender Statistics

  • 56% of all U.S. undergraduate college students are women
  • Women tend to dominate in fields like health professions, with approximately 85% of all bachelor's degrees awarded in the field are given to women.
  • In 2017, 81% of U.S. social work majors were women.
  • Men make up 80% of engineering majors in U.S. colleges.
  • In 2017, only 19% of bachelor's degrees in computer science went to women.
  • Over 70% of psychology degrees are awarded to women.
  • Only 39% of physical science majors are female.
  • 57% of biological science majors are female.
  • In 2017, men received 56% of bachelor's degrees in Mathematics in the U.S.
  • About 88% of all bachelor's degrees in nursing are awarded to women.
  • The number of women majoring in computer science has decreased from 37% in 1984 to about 18% in 2017.
  • In 2020, only about 24% of statistics and mathematics majors are females.
  • About 47% of chemistry degrees go to women.
  • About 75% of education degrees are awarded to women.
  • In 2016, about 60% of all bachelor's degrees in the United States were earned by women.
  • In 2016, women earned more than half (57.34%) of bachelor's degrees in English language and literature.
  • In 2018, women earned 34% of the bachelor's degrees in Economics.
  • In 2018, women made up only 22% of students in undergraduate physics programs.

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Curious about the distribution of college majors by gender? You’re not alone. The analysis of college majors by gender yields fascinating insights into the societal and individual preferences influencing the educational pathways of men and women. This blog post delves into the profound world of gender statistics in college majors, presenting an in-depth discussion of where the numbers take us in understanding the concentration of genders in various academic disciplines. From technology and engineering to humanities and social sciences, we’ll disseminate significant data-based truths and trends, illuminating how male and female students sway towards different areas of study.

The Latest College Majors By Gender Statistics Unveiled

56% of all U.S. undergraduate college students are women

Highlighting the statistic ‘56% of all U.S. undergraduate college students are women’ serves as a poignant introduction to College Majors By Gender Statistics. It’s akin to watching a revealing prologue before a captivating story unfolds – it efficiently sets the stage for a more detailed discussion on gender disparities in various college majors. This striking figure underscores the substantial presence of women in undergraduate education, constituting more than half of the student body, which then opens the discourse on how women are distributed across different fields of study, their choices, and the potential reasons behind their preferences. This percentage undeniably prompts intriguing questions about the interaction between gender and academic paths, making our exploration of College Majors By Gender Statistics both insightful and necessary.

Women tend to dominate in fields like health professions, with approximately 85% of all bachelor’s degrees awarded in the field are given to women.

In the landscape of College Majors By Gender Statistics, the statistic that around 85% of all bachelor’s degrees in health professions are awarded to women takes center stage. This startling majority hints to a significant gender imbalance in this field in terms of academic achievement. It underscores the gravitation of women towards health related disciplines, possibly being driven by their inherent inclinations, societal roles or educational pathways. This not only enriches our understanding of women’s growing role in health professions, but also acts as a catalyst for further dialogue on gender diversity and representation across various academic fields.

In 2017, 81% of U.S. social work majors were women.

The statistic ‘In 2017, 81% of U.S. social work majors were women’ provides a pronounced illustration of the gender disparity prevalent in certain college majors. In the context of enlightening readers about College Majors By Gender Statistics in a blog post, this accessible case of gender skewness outlines a panoramic bias for readers, indicating the lack of male representation in social work fields. The very prevalence of such statistics can stimulate thoughtful conversation about the reasons behind such gender biases, raise awareness about the diversity in professional fields, and help drive interventions that promote gender equality in academia.

Men make up 80% of engineering majors in U.S. colleges.

Highlighting the statistic that men account for 80% of engineering majors in U.S. colleges serves as a stark indicator of the persistent gender imbalance within this field of study. In a landscape where the fight for gender equality is increasingly gaining traction, this figure underlines the pressing need for initiatives to encourage and support women in pursuing engineering and similar STEM fields. It is an emphatic signpost pointing towards the larger societal issue of unequal gender representation in the industry, often perceived as male-dominated, and invites introspection, discussion, and concerted action.

In 2017, only 19% of bachelor’s degrees in computer science went to women.

Highlighting the statistic that in 2017, only 19% of computer science bachelor’s degrees were awarded to women not only illustrates a significant gender disparity in this specific field but also underscores a broader issue in the landscape of higher education. Amidst the exponential growth of technology and its importance in the modern world, this figure serves as a stark reminder of the underrepresentation of women in science and technology-related disciplines. Bringing attention to this statistic in a blog post about College Majors By Gender Statistics can spark serious conversations about fostering diversity and equality within these crucial sectors of academia and beyond.

Over 70% of psychology degrees are awarded to women.

Highlighting the statistic of “Over 70% of psychology degrees awarded to women” serves as a crucial piece of the mosaic in understanding the gender distribution across college majors. It palpably demonstrates the prevailing inclination of women towards fields like psychology, contributing to the broader picture of gender disparities in the realm of higher education. This point underscores the necessity to consider gender patterns when mapping educational paths and paving the way to career opportunities, possibly triggering further investigations into the underlying elements shaping such trends in the blog post about College Majors By Gender Statistics.

Only 39% of physical science majors are female.

Highlighting that only 39% of physical science majors are female underscores a significant underrepresentation in a traditionally male-dominated field. This figure signals the persistent gender imbalance prevalent in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) disciplines, stirring up conversations on the need for diverse perspectives, gender equality, and inclusivity in these areas. A closer look at such statistics in a college context fosters an in-depth analysis of the historical, societal, and cultural factors inhibiting female participation in physical science – a critical standpoint in unfolding narratives around gender roles in educational and professional pursuits.

57% of biological science majors are female.

Reflecting upon the intriguing statistic that ‘57% of biological science majors are female’, it paints a compelling portrait of the evolving demographics in higher education. Notably, it underlines a shift from historical patterns of male-dominated science fields, underpinning the growing influence and representation of women within the biological sciences. This statistic forms a critical cornerstone for the discussion on gender distribution across various college majors, shedding light on the direction and magnitude of change, fostering debate on diversity, inclusivity, and the breaking down of traditional gender stereotypes in the realm of academia.

In 2017, men received 56% of bachelor’s degrees in Mathematics in the U.S.

Unveiling an intriguing insight into college majors and gender, the 2017 statistics divulge a compelling narrative where a noteworthy 56% of Mathematics bachelor’s degrees in the United States were earned by men. This data ignites a dialogue surrounding not just gender dynamics in education, but also their implications and reflections in the workforce, specifically in industries related to Mathematics such as science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). As such, it provides a significant launching pad for explorations on gender ratios, potential biases in educational choices, and the ongoing efforts to bridge the gender gap in traditionally male-dominated subjects.

About 88% of all bachelor’s degrees in nursing are awarded to women.

In the realm of gender nuances concerning college majors, the statistic that portrays about 88% of all bachelor’s degrees in nursing are awarded to women is a compelling testament to the profound female representation in this field. It serves to underscore the entrenched gender imbalances in certain academic disciplines, with nursing being emblematic of college majors traditionally dominated by women. For those examining patterns in gender disparities across different academic domains, this statistic can be a striking point of reference, shedding light on broader socio-cultural dynamics and the consequent implications for endeavors aimed at fostering gender parity in education.

The number of women majoring in computer science has decreased from 37% in 1984 to about 18% in 2017.

Discerning the downward trend in the percentage of women majoring in computer science—from a significant 37% in 1984 to nearly halved at 18% by 2017—lays bare a pressing narrative in promoting gender balance in college majors. It sheds light on a disparity that fetches close scrutiny, especially on a platform discussing College Majors by Gender Statistics. The statistic’s stark contrast presents an invitation to dive deeper into the factors contributing to the underrepresentation of women in computer science, a lapsing dynamism in a sector that is rapidly growing and pushing the technological frontier, thereby opening a wider dialogue on strategies for fostering more inclusive academic environments.

In 2020, only about 24% of statistics and mathematics majors are females.

Highlighting the fact that in 2020, merely 24% of statistics and mathematics majors were females, brings a critical issue to the spotlight. This figure weaves a significant narrative in the story of gender disparities within certain educational domains in college. It serves as a poignant reminder about the persistent gender gap in fields traditionally dominated by males, like statistics and mathematics. It becomes even more poignant considering the current push towards gender equality and the paramount importance of these fields in today’s data-driven, technology-powered world. This number should act as a catalyst for educators, policymakers, and society at large, to drive more inclusion and encourage a higher enrollment of females in such fields, dispelling stereotypes along the way.

About 47% of chemistry degrees go to women.

Peering into the intriguing world of College Majors by Gender Statistics, the datum indicating that a considerable 47% of chemistry degrees are awarded to women unfurls a narrative of evolving gender dynamics within academia. This substantial figure not only underscores the progressive inclusion of women in the traditionally male-dominated realm of science, especially that of hard sciences like chemistry but also sheds light on the ongoing shift in gender parity within the educational sector. Undeniably, this enriches the discourse on societal progression, as this rise in female chemistry major holders may lead to a more diversified scientific community, stimulate research innovation, and challenge historical gender stereotypes.

About 75% of education degrees are awarded to women.

Illuminating a predominant gender trend in a specific field of study, the statistic states that women are the recipients of approximately 75% of education degrees. This veritable dominance of women in the educational field underscores the potential influences on teaching styles, classroom environments and learning methodologies, all shaped to a large extent by the female perspective. In the gender tapestry of college majors, this statistic emblazoned a clear warp and weft, prompting fruitful discussion and analysis concerning the role of gender in our educational fabric. Such data is a crucial piece in the jigsaw puzzle of understanding and dissecting gender roles within different academic fields.

In 2016, about 60% of all bachelor’s degrees in the United States were earned by women.

Highlighting this figure: ‘In 2016, about 60% of all bachelor’s degrees in the United States were earned by women.’ provides invaluable perspective in a discussion about College Majors by Gender Statistics. It positions a critical lens on the shifting terrain of higher education, showcasing an evident rise in female participation. In this ongoing narrative of gender equality and female empowerment, the statistic underscores the promising strides towards gender parity as more women are taking lead in the pursuit of tertiary education. As much as it speaks volumes about the increasing acceptance and inclusion of women in academic realms, it also serves as a catalyst for deeper dialogues about the representation of women across different majors, possible causes of such trends, and their implications for the future workplace and society at large.

In 2016, women earned more than half (57.34%) of bachelor’s degrees in English language and literature.

With an illuminating light, the statistic reveals a crucial shift in the academic landscape through the lens of gender dynamics. The narrative it communicates is one of women prevailing in the field of English language and literature in 2016, earning a majority of 57.34% bachelor’s degrees, clearly surpassing the halfway mark. This statistic contributes a vital piece to the larger puzzle of college majors by gender statistics, showcasing not only the academic inclinations of women but also their increasing prominence and engagement in higher education. It highlights a movement towards gender equity in academia, while simultaneously painting a vivid picture of women’s unique influence and direction in the sphere of English language and literature.

In 2018, women earned 34% of the bachelor’s degrees in Economics.

Highlighting that women earned a mere 34% of bachelor’s degrees in Economics in 2018 provides a vivid snapshot of the gender disparity present even in the realm of higher education. This figure, woven into the narrative of a blog post about College Majors by Gender Statistics, punctuates the ongoing discussion about the need to promote gender equality in academia. As a poignant illustration of the underrepresentation of women in traditionally male-dominated fields like economics, it underscores the necessity for continued efforts in challenging gender norms and promoting diverse representation across all areas of study.

In 2018, women made up only 22% of students in undergraduate physics programs.

Shining a spotlight on the intriguing 2018 statistic that reveals a slim 22% of students in undergraduate physics programs were females, provides an essential perspective for unpacking gender imbalances within the education system. In a narrative thread about College Majors by Gender Statistics, this data piece serves as a compelling illustration of gender disparities in traditionally male-dominated fields. It creates the impetus to probe deeper into the underlying societal, systemic, or personal barriers preventing women from pursuing these hard science disciplines. Hence, this figure doesn’t simply represent a quantitative truth, but forms the paramount cornerstone of our discussion around gender equity in academia’s corridors.

Conclusion

In summary, college majors exhibit a significant gender imbalance, which seems to align with societal stereotypes. Our examination of the data showed that areas such as Engineering, Computer Science, and Physics are predominantly male-dominated, while Nursing, Education, and Psychology have a majority of female students. There’s a clear necessity for more balanced representation across all fields of study, as this diversity can lead to more comprehensive, innovative outcomes. To tackle this disparity, interventions should primarily focus on breaking down gender stereotypes and encouraging equal student engagement in all disciplines.

References

0. – https://www.nces.ed.gov

1. – https://www.www.aps.org

2. – https://www.www.nsf.gov

3. – https://www.www.humanitiesindicators.org

4. – https://www.www.statista.com

5. – https://www.www.npr.org

6. – https://www.www.pewsocialtrends.org

7. – https://www.www.chemistryworld.com

8. – https://www.www.apa.org

9. – https://www.www.bls.gov

10. – https://www.www.catalyst.org

11. – https://www.www.aeaweb.org

FAQs

What is the most chosen college major for males?

According to recent statistics, Business Administration and Management is one of the most chosen majors by males.

What are the top three college majors chosen by females?

The top three college majors typically chosen by females are Nursing, Psychology, and Elementary Education.

Are there any majors that are equally popular among males and females?

Business Administration and Management as well as Biology tend to be popular among both males and females.

Are there majors that are predominantly chosen by one gender over the other?

Yes, certain fields like Computer Science and Engineering tend to be chosen more by males, while Education and Nursing majors are more often chosen by females.

Has the gender distribution in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) college majors changed over time?

Yes, the gender distribution in STEM fields has been changing, with more females engaging in these majors, but it still remains far from equal.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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