GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Black Males In College Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Black Males In College Statistics

  • In 2018, 33.6% of Black men ages 18 to 24 years were enrolled in college.
  • In 2019, 59.1% of African American high school completers enrolled in higher education.
  • Black men make up only 5.5% of all college students enrolled in the United States.
  • At the current pace of progress, it will take Black men four centuries to catch up to the graduation rates of white males.
  • Approximately 35% of Black males who start college complete their degree.
  • In the 2016-17 academic year, some 1.8 million Black men and women were enrolled in degree-granting institutions.
  • The six-year graduation rate of first-time, full-time undergraduate Black men was 37.5% in 2018.
  • In 2017, 75% of African American students borrowed federal student loans for their bachelor's degree.
  • In 2016, the median earnings of Black male college graduates aged 25-34 was $45,000, below the $50,000 for all male college graduates.
  • As of 2016, Black males in collegiate sports make up 2.8% of full-time degree-seeking undergraduates but 56.3 percent of football teams and 60.8 percent of basketball teams.
  • In 2018, only 15% of Black males aged 25 and over held a Bachelor’s degree.
  • As of 2018, Black men have a college attendance rate of 34%, compared to 39% for Black women.
  • In 2019, Black high school graduates were the most underrepresented in bachelor's degree attainment at 27.9%.
  • Across all degree levels in 2013, Black males made up 34% of awarded degrees to Black students.
  • The percentage of Black STEM majors who are men fell from 24% in 1995 to 19% in 2016.
  • Between 2000 and 2010, the percentage of Black male college students increased from 5.1% to 5.5%.
  • As of 2018, there were 1.7 million Black male students and 2.4 million Black female students in U.S. postsecondary schools.
  • From 1999-2000 to 2015-16, the percentage of degrees in science and engineering conferred to Black males decreased from 10.7% to 8.7%.

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In today’s evolving educational landscape, understanding statistical trends has a crucial role in formulating effective policies. One demographic that particularly stands out in this spectrum is Black Males in College. From enrolment rates to graduation statistics, the data surrounding Black Male students provide an insightful picture of their triumphs, trials, and tribulations in the realm of higher education. With a careful look into these statistics, we can unfold narratives not only about individual accomplishment and struggle, but also about the state of broader institutional systems, challenging us to confront any existing racial disparities to ensure every student is positioned for success.

The Latest Black Males In College Statistics Unveiled

In 2018, 33.6% of Black men ages 18 to 24 years were enrolled in college.

Highlighting the statistic, ‘In 2018, 33.6% of Black men ages 18 to 24 years were enrolled in college’ subtly underscores an important point across in our discourse on Black Males In College Statistics. It paints an encouraging image of the continual climb in college enrollment among young black males, a demographic traditionally underrepresented in higher education. This number serves as testament to the gradual erasure of racial inequity in education, yet indubitably showcasing that there is still ample room for further improvement. Thus, this statistic propels our conversation forward, inspiring further exploration on the matter and a stronger determination towards greater educational success for black men.

In 2019, 59.1% of African American high school completers enrolled in higher education.

Highlighted within the rich tapestry of Black Males in College Statistics, the impressive figure of 59.1% African American high school graduates moving onto higher education in 2019 plays an important role in crafting a narrative of progress and growth. Representing the escalating power of education, this figure mirrors the tenacity and drive of African-American males towards academia, challenging societal and historical biases. The instantiation of such a number works as an encouraging beacon, marking not just the advance in black education, but also highlighting the spaces yet to be conquered, thus forming the foundation for further discussions around college admission rates, retention, and post-graduation success.

Black men make up only 5.5% of all college students enrolled in the United States.

Highlighting that merely 5.5% of all college students in the United States are Black men, paints a stark picture of the persisting educational disparities. In the prism of our discourse on Black Males in College Statistics, this strikingly low percentage underscores the urgent necessity for proactive initiatives that bolster access to higher education for Black men. Threaded with socio-economic and historical dimensions, this figure brings into focus the systemic hurdles Black males grapple with on their educational journey, besides urging academicians, policy framing bodies and social organizations to join hands in amplifying this underrepresented demographic’s numbers in college enrolment.

At the current pace of progress, it will take Black men four centuries to catch up to the graduation rates of white males.

Highlighting the projected four centuries it will take for Black men to attain parity with graduation rates of white males underscores a glaring disparity in the American educational system. This lagspeed, more than just indicating numerical discrepancy, represents systemic barriers and structural inequalities that curtail opportunities for black men in higher education. Adding this data into the discourse deepens understanding and thus, underpins the urgency of evolving strategies to erase this racial achievement gap. It conveys a resonate message about the necessity of policy changes, sustained support, and concerted efforts to bridge this educational chasm, ensuring social justice and an equitable society.

Approximately 35% of Black males who start college complete their degree.

Highlighting the figure that approximately 35% of Black males who initiate their college journey achieve degree completion paints a stark picture of the racial disparities pervasive in our higher educational system. In a blog post centering on Black Males In College Statistics, this figure serves as a significant pulse check, underscoring not just the struggles and barriers that these students face, but also the potential reservoir of untapped talent. Exploring this number further may help uncover the hidden truths surrounding retention rates, shedding light on the gaps in resources, support and opportunities that contribute towards this frustrating statistic – key points that need addressing if we are to promote diversity and inclusion within academia.

In the 2016-17 academic year, some 1.8 million Black men and women were enrolled in degree-granting institutions.

The impressive figure of 1.8 million Black men and women enrolled in degree-granting institutions in the 2016-17 academic year serves as a beacon of progress within the discussion of Black male college statistics. It signifies an elevation in educational attainment within the Black community, subtly debunking perceptual biases about their academic pursuits. In a society grappling with racial disparities and educational inequality, this number stands as a testament to ascending trends in college enrollment among Black students, reinforcing the narrative that key steps are being taken to bridge the ethnic gap in higher education. Such a shift also lays the groundwork for future discussions around retention and graduation rates among this demographic, moving the conversation beyond mere enrollment.

The six-year graduation rate of first-time, full-time undergraduate Black men was 37.5% in 2018.

Highlighting the statistic that the six-year graduation rate of first-time, full-time undergraduate Black men was 37.5% in 2018 serves as a sharp wake-up call on our blog post regarding Black Males In College Statistics. It lays bare an essential reality of educational disparity that can often be lost in broad-stroke discussions of post-secondary education. This figure, starkly lower than the national cross-racial average, forcefully illuminates the unique challenges faced by this demographic. Furthermore, it underscores the vital importance of implementing supportive strategies and policies aimed at increasing retention and graduation rates among Black males within the higher education system.

In 2017, 75% of African American students borrowed federal student loans for their bachelor’s degree.

Drawing attention to the statistic that in 2017, 75% of African American students borrowed federal student loans for their bachelor’s degree, underscores the potential barriers many Black males face in their pursuit of higher education. In the pivotal conversation surrounding Black males in college, it frames the lens towards the reality of financial strain and hints at a systemic disparity. Knowing the significance of this figure can motivate apposite policy changes, while stimulating discussions about affordable and accessible tertiary education for all, especially groups typically marginalized or financially burdened. Ultimately, it serves as a catalyst pushing for a reform aiming at equal opportunities in education, with an emphasis on Black males who are key participants in this narrative.

In 2016, the median earnings of Black male college graduates aged 25-34 was $45,000, below the $50,000 for all male college graduates.

Highlighting the 2016 data showing that Black male college graduates aged 25-34 had median earnings of $45,000, which is less than the $50,000 for all male college graduates, underscores an essential point in the narrative about Black Males in College Statistics. This difference showcases an income disparity even after leveling the educational ground, suggesting that having a college degree does not automatically equate to economic equality. This piece of data steers the conversation towards systemic issues, like racial income gaps and career opportunity differences that persist post-graduation, fostering a deeper, broader discussion about the experiences of Black male college students and graduates in America.

As of 2016, Black males in collegiate sports make up 2.8% of full-time degree-seeking undergraduates but 56.3 percent of football teams and 60.8 percent of basketball teams.

Delving into the universe of collegiate sports, it’s striking to observe that, as of 2016, Black males comprise just 2.8% of the full-time degree-seeking undergraduate population, yet astonishingly dominate the football and basketball teams, accounting for a resounding 56.3% and 60.8% respectively. Beyond the mere numerical difference, these figures artfully narrate an untold story of the structural and systemic dichotomies in higher education and social dynamics. They give a clue to the flawed notion that success for Black males is hugely tied to athletic prowess rather than academic excellence. Highlighting this phenomenon, in a broader discourse, amplifies the need to flip the narrative, encouraging more equity in academic opportunities and fostering an environment where Black males are equally recognized for their academic pursuits.

In 2018, only 15% of Black males aged 25 and over held a Bachelor’s degree.

Highlighting the fact that in 2018, merely 15% of Black males aged 25 and over held a Bachelor’s degree presents a crucial aspect of the discourse on the participation of Black males in higher education. This statistic underscores the urgency to address the barriers impeding their educational attainment, whether these are socio-economic factors, systemic injustices, or lack of mentorship and support. Furthermore, it fosters a dialogue to enhance outreach, funding, and educational strategies tailored to this demographic group. The statistic carries implications on the broader pursuits for racial equity in the society, thus suffusing our blog post with depth and relevance.

As of 2018, Black men have a college attendance rate of 34%, compared to 39% for Black women.

Shining the spotlight on the figure: ‘As of 2018, Black men have a college attendance rate of 34%, compared to 39% for Black women’ — we discern a cornerstone of discussion for a blog post about Black Males In College Statistics. By unmasking the disparity between the college attendance rates of Black males and females, we provoke a deeper deliberation about the barriers hindering black males from accessing higher education. Dissecting this trend is critical for framing conversations about inequality in educational opportunities and developing interventions to bridge this gap, empowering black males to shape their future through higher education.

In 2019, Black high school graduates were the most underrepresented in bachelor’s degree attainment at 27.9%.

Highlighting the statistic that only 27.9% of Black high school graduates attained a bachelor’s degree in 2019, underscores the striking disparity in higher education outcomes for Black males. Within a discourse on Black Males in College Statistics, such a number provides contemplative insight into the systemic challenges and barriers these individuals may face on their educational journey. This percentage is a call to action for educational institutions, policy makers, and society at large to delve deeply into the root causes and seek effective strategies for greater inclusion and equity in educational attainment. The reality reflected in this statistic carries significant implications for future economic opportunities, social mobility, and personal development, thereby demanding further scrutiny and change.

Across all degree levels in 2013, Black males made up 34% of awarded degrees to Black students.

Highlighting the statistic that Black males constituted 34% of awarded degrees to Black students across all degree levels in 2013 is a vital touchpoint in the narrative of Black Males in College Statistics. It serves as a testament to the progress in efforts towards educational equality, while underlining the continuing disparity and the task that remains. This figure amplifies the voices of Black males striving in the academic field, pointing out the representation and successes already achieved. Simultaneously, it dispatches a call-to-action to society, policymakers, and educators to focus their resources and efforts in closing the still existent gap, ensuring a more balanced, inclusive academic space.

The percentage of Black STEM majors who are men fell from 24% in 1995 to 19% in 2016.

Spotlighting the decline in black male representation within STEM majors from 24% in 1995 to 19% in 2016, adequately illuminates an area of concern in our discourse about black males in college statistics. This dip is significant as it underscores the dwindling involvement of black males in the fast-growing fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, where they could be instrumental in contributing to advancements and diversifying the sector. These statistics emphasize a concerning trend within higher education and the STEM community, urging a concerted effort towards greater inclusivity and devising strategies for retention and success of black males within these critical disciplines.

Between 2000 and 2010, the percentage of Black male college students increased from 5.1% to 5.5%.

Highlighting the ascension from 5.1% to 5.5% in the population of black male students attending college between 2000-2010 serves as a compact yet profound testament to the slowly changing dynamics of racial representation in higher education. It underscores an imperative narrative of progress, albeit modest, in encouraging diversity and coverage alongside the fight for equal opportunities in the context of academia. Yet, it also compels the reader to acknowledge the lingering disparity that persists. This statistic serves as both a beacon of advancement and a call to action within the context of a blog post about Black Males in College Statistics, making it an indispensable point of discussion.

As of 2018, there were 1.7 million Black male students and 2.4 million Black female students in U.S. postsecondary schools.

This data paints a striking and undeniably disquieting picture of the state of postsecondary education among Black American students. 2018 saw a significant 41% disparity between the number of Black male and female students in U.S. colleges. Evidently, this highlights the looming educational disparity issue that is rife within the influential confines of higher education. This figure champions the argument of underrepresentation of Black males in these educational establishments, adding sparking flames to the already hot topic of gender and racial inequality in U.S. Colleges. Therefore, such numbers necessitate an in-depth, analytical assessment and rigorous discourse in a blog post revolving around understanding Black males’ position within college statistics.

From 1999-2000 to 2015-16, the percentage of degrees in science and engineering conferred to Black males decreased from 10.7% to 8.7%.

The underlined statistic indicates a troubling trend in the academic trajectory of Black males, shedding light on their decreased representation in the pivotal fields of science and engineering over a span of 16 years. This downward shift isn’t just a matter of percentages – it reflects a wider societal issue that resonates deeply in the discourse of equality in education. By underscoring the fall from 10.7% to 8.7%, it invites the readers to question the underlying causes, be it socio-economic factors, institutional obstacles or other systemic biases. In essence, definitively a statistic that inextricably links to the broader narrative on college enrollment, success rates, and career opportunities for Black males.

Conclusion

The data and statistics surrounding black males in college are both revealing and thought-provoking. While there has been a noticeable increase in college enrollment over the past few decades, clear disparities persist, particularly in graduation rates and in STEM fields. Achieving true equality in higher education is a complex undertaking and requires addressing socio-economic disparities, improving access to quality education from early childhood, and promoting supportive policies and practices in colleges and universities. With concerted effort, we can imagine a future where the demographics of college graduates accurately reflect our diverse population.

References

0. – https://www.www.pbs.org

1. – https://www.ccie.ucf.edu

2. – https://www.www.acenet.edu

3. – https://www.www.npr.org

4. – https://www.www.nsf.gov

5. – https://www.www.bls.gov

6. – https://www.ticas.org

7. – https://www.www.shrm.org

8. – https://www.nces.ed.gov

9. – https://www.www.bjs.gov

10. – https://www.ncses.nsf.gov

11. – https://www.www.census.gov

FAQs

What is the enrollment rate of black males in U.S. colleges?

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, as of 2019, approximately 15 percent of undergraduate post-secondary students in the United States were black, with less than half of those being black males. However, the rates vary among different colleges and regions.

What are some of the barriers black men face when pursuing higher education?

Black men often face social, economic, and academic barriers in their pursuit of higher education. Some common obstacles include lack of access to quality preparatory education, racial discrimination, economic challenges, a lack of mentorship, and cultural incongruence in predominantly white institutions.

What is the graduation rate of black males in U.S colleges?

According to a 2020 report from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, the six-year graduation rate for black males who started college in 2013 was about 40 percent. These rates, however, vary significantly between different institutions and fields of study.

Are there organizations or programs committed to improving college outcomes for black men?

Yes, numerous organizations and programs are dedicated to improving college outcomes for black men. These include the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, the United Negro College Fund, and initiatives like "My Brother's Keeper" launched by former President Barack Obama.

How does college education impact the earning potential of black males?

College education significantly increases the earning potential of black males. According to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics, individuals with a bachelor's degree earned about 67 percent more than those with only a high school diploma in 2020. By earning college degrees, black males can significantly increase their earning potential and employment opportunities.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

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