GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Young Black Male Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Young Black Male Statistics

  • In 2019, 18% of all young black men aged 18-24 were enrolled in college.
  • Young black men between ages 15-34 are nine times more likely than other Americans to be killed by police officers.
  • In 2016, the unemployment rate for black males aged 20 to 24 was 14.3%, which is high compared to whites of the same age group (7.1%).
  • As of 2017, 21% of Black male students received an out-of-school suspension.
  • Nearly 25% of young Black men are living in poverty.
  • In 2020, police fatally shot 23 unarmed black men and boys, comprising 35.4% of all unarmed police fatalities.
  • In 2018, the age-adjusted death rate for Black men (1,059.6 per 100,000 population) was 1.4 times higher than the rate for White men (769.8).
  • In 2017, Black males aged 18-19 were 12 times more likely to face murder and non-negligent manslaughter charges.
  • Six percent of Black males were in the corrections system (prison, jail, probation, or parole) in 2017, a rate that is double the rate for Hispanic males (3%) and six times the rate for white males (1%).
  • 19.6% of all Black men in the US had a bachelor's degree or higher in 2019.
  • Roughly 1,100 black men and boys are killed by police annually in the United States.
  • Black males between the ages of 10 and 17 are around 2.5 times more likely to be arrested for a crime than white males of the same age.
  • In 2016, 44.1% of black males graduated from high school on time, compared to 66.6% of white males.
  • In 2018, only 8% of all bachelor's degrees in STEM fields were awarded to Black men or women.
  • In 2014, ownership rates for Black men under the age of 35 were 13% while White men were 35.3%.
  • Young Black males in 2020 earned 67.5% as much as their White counterparts.
  • As of 2020, the rate of HIV diagnoses among adult and adolescent Black/African American males was 6.7 times that of white males.
  • In 2019, only 58% of Black men 25 and older had a high school diploma.
  • For the period 2015-2019, the homicide victimization rate for Black males was 32.32 per 100,000.
  • Black males comprised approximately 2% of educators in public schools in 2011–12.

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Deep and reliable statistics can provide eye-opening insights into the state and pace of societal change. In this blog post, we delve into the world of data, focusing exclusively on young Black males. Whether the discourse is on education, employment, or crime rates, we tend to hear many claims, but it is crucial to separate factual truth from impassioned fiction. Using carefully compiled and scrutinized statistics, we aim to provide you with a clear understanding and comprehensive picture of the socioeconomic terrain navigated by young Black males in our modern society. Beyond just data, we aim to ignite educated conversations and drive effective actions.

The Latest Young Black Male Statistics Unveiled

In 2019, 18% of all young black men aged 18-24 were enrolled in college.

The statistic that 18% of all young black men aged 18-24 were enrolled in college in 2019 isn’t just a fact. It’s a vibrant tapestry, subtly blending the nuances of education, socioeconomic trends, and societal challenges that black men continue to combat. It represents an intersection of knowledge, opportunity, and potential; an echo of historical disparities rendered in present time, yet also a beacon of progress and an indication of a steady, though slow, march towards educational equity. Recognizing this, the percentage serves as a key touchstone in the narrative of Young Black Male Statistics, anchoring a broader conversation about addressing existing gaps and promoting inclusive advancement.

Young black men between ages 15-34 are nine times more likely than other Americans to be killed by police officers.

Highlighting the unsettling statistic- the disproportionate likelihood of young black men aged between 15-34 to face fatal police encounters, conveys a powerful message in a blog post centered on Young Black Male Statistics. It creates a chilling image of the severe racial disparities in law enforcement. This data serves as a grim testimony to the deep-rooted prejudices that continue to permeate America’s policing system. It also underscores the urgent need for rectifying such injustices by instigating systemic changes in policing methods and criminal justice reforms, thereby rekindling a meaningful discourse on equal rights and social justice.

In 2016, the unemployment rate for black males aged 20 to 24 was 14.3%, which is high compared to whites of the same age group (7.1%).

Highlighting the glaring disparity in the unemployment rates between young black males and their white counterparts, as seen in the 2016 statistics, offers a lens into the deep-seated economic inequalities at play within society. In the context of a blog post centred on “Young Black Male Statistics,” this statistic can be the leverage to underscore the need for comprehensive reforms in socio-economic policies to ensure equal employment opportunities for all, irrespective of race or ethnicity. Equipped with such insights, readers are better positioned to understand the pressing challenges faced by young black males, stimulating critical discussion and action aimed at minimizing race-based disparities in economic access and outcomes.

As of 2017, 21% of Black male students received an out-of-school suspension.

Highlighting that, in 2017, 21% of Black male students experienced out-of-school suspension underlines an important facet of educational disparity and systemic racism faced by Black youth in America. This number provides a stark piece of empirical evidence, pointing towards systemic issues of discipline and fairness in schools. Consequently, this elevates the discussion in the blog about Young Black Male Statistics, bringing to the surface the challenges that Black male students have to navigate in their academic journeys. It also invokes a broader dialogue about the societal and educational reforms necessary to level out the playing field for young Black males.

Nearly 25% of young Black men are living in poverty.

In the ongoing dialogue around young Black male statistics, the data point that nearly 25% of these individuals are living in poverty reverberates with critical implications. Shedding light on the economic challenges in this demographic, this startling ratio underscores systemic social issues like educational disparities, unequal job opportunities, and institutional racism that disproportionately affect young Black males. Such a statistic serves as a call to action, inciting conversations on policy reform, socio-economic support, and affirmative efforts to alleviate the circumstances leading to this distressing poverty rate.

In 2020, police fatally shot 23 unarmed black men and boys, comprising 35.4% of all unarmed police fatalities.

In a deeply poignant context of young black male statistics, the chilling record of police fatally shooting 23 unarmed black men and boys in 2020, which makes up 35.4% of all unarmed police fatalities, unveils harrowing truths about racial disparities in law enforcement’s use of extreme force. This sobering statistic, a bleeding heart of the post, underscores systemic biases ingrained in our justice system, reinforcing a troubling narrative about the heightened dangers and prejudices faced by black males, especially the youth, in their encounters with police. It unveils a critical facet of the broader societal conversation we must have on race, policing, and policy reform.

In 2018, the age-adjusted death rate for Black men (1,059.6 per 100,000 population) was 1.4 times higher than the rate for White men (769.8).

The stark variance in age-adjusted death rates between Black men and White men showcased in the 2018 data elucidates the profound racial disparities that pervade the healthcare system. Highlighting an alarmingly higher mortality rate for Black men (1,059.6 per 100,000 population) compared to their White counterparts (769.8), this statistic underscores the urgency to address and rectify the systemic issues contributing to these health inequalities. In the broad theme of a Young Black Male Statistics blog post, this grim figure serves as a compelling talking point around which discussions can be swirled to heighten awareness, incite proactive discourse, and eventually inspire tangible changes to ensure equal health outcomes for all.

In 2017, Black males aged 18-19 were 12 times more likely to face murder and non-negligent manslaughter charges.

This compelling statistic offers a stark window into the urgent conversation about the overrepresentation of young, Black males within criminal justice systems. In the context of a blog post about young Black male statistics, it underlines the urgent need for comprehensive societal, policy, and law enforcement changes. It renders tangible the disproportionate challenges borne by Black males aged 18-19, showcasing an alarming twelvefold likelihood of being implicated in murder or non-negligent manslaughter charges compared to their counterparts. Furthermore, it underscores the paramount discussion on how issues like structural racial bias, socio-economic inequality, and lack of educational resources could contribute to such grim statistics. This figure inevitably rouses further discourse on the strategies necessary to catalyze substantive reforms addressing these disparities.

Six percent of Black males were in the corrections system (prison, jail, probation, or parole) in 2017, a rate that is double the rate for Hispanic males (3%) and six times the rate for white males (1%).

These striking figures shed stark light on an undeniable facet of the reality lived by young black males within the United States. The disproportionate incarceration factor – with a staggering six times higher rate than their white counterparts and double of that of Hispanic males – speaks volumes of the inherent, systemic biases and socio-economic disparities deeply entrenched in the system. In a blog focusing on the statistics concerning young black males, these figures emphasize the urgent and critical need for progress in comprehensive judicial reform, education, social support systems, and broader societal change, while also calling into question prevalent stereotypes and prejudices that such narratives may perpetuate.

19.6% of all Black men in the US had a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2019.

Spotlighting the fact that 19.6% of all Black men in the US had a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2019 weaves a critical narrative into the fabric of a blog post focused on Young Black Male Statistics. This figure accentuates the positive strides being made within this demographic, highlighting the educational accomplishments that often remain underrepresented and oversimplified. As such, it fosters a potent dialogue about upwards mobility, the value of education, and the breaking of stereotypes while underscoring the importance of continued support for higher education within the Black community.

Roughly 1,100 black men and boys are killed by police annually in the United States.

In the province of the blogpost centered on Young Black Male Statistics, the sobering figure citing that approximately 1,100 black men and boys succumb to police interactions annually within the United States erects a poignant and unquestionable emblem of the stark realities faced by this demographic. This number not only serves as a grim synopsis of the escalating crisis but also ignites a profound debate about racial disparities, law enforcement biases, and systemic disparities. Navigating through the societal frictions, it impels us to comprehend, dissect, and address the deep-seated issues encompassing police brutality, discrimination, and racial injustice, thus striking the core essence of the featured discourse.

Black males between the ages of 10 and 17 are around 2.5 times more likely to be arrested for a crime than white males of the same age.

Diving into the world of young black male statistics, one can’t tiptoe around the sobering revelation that black males aged 10 to 17 are about 2.5 times more likely to be arrested for a crime compared to their white peers. Haltingly, this statistic wields implications that extend far beyond mere numbers on a sheet. It sharply underscores the stark intersectionality between race, age, and justice in our society, exposing disparities that demand inspection and dialogue. This metric serves as a mirror reflecting societal biases, systemic inequities and the challenges young black males face, adding volume to the call for civil and social justice reform. This isn’t just a statistic – it’s a spotlight on an urgent issue we need to address.

In 2016, 44.1% of black males graduated from high school on time, compared to 66.6% of white males.

Highlighting the fact that in 2016, only 44.1% of black males graduated high school on-time versus their white counterparts at 66.6% crystallizes the stark educational disparities besetting young black males. Amid an enlightening discourse on Young Black Male Statistics, this figure reflects an intrinsic inequity within our educational system, effectively manifesting in the form of graduation rates. It paints a vivid picture that calls for immediate interventions to close this gap, advocating for educational policies that level the playing field and empower every young black male with the necessary tools to succeed.

In 2018, only 8% of all bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields were awarded to Black men or women.

Highlighted in the underbelly of America’s academic discourse, the somewhat striking revelation of only 8% of all bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields being awarded to Black men or women in 2018 reveals an unwelcoming reality. In the pulsating rhythm of a blog post centered around Young Black Male Statistics, this fact serves as an unnerving underscore to the widespread systemic discrepancies faced by a demographic often caught in the crosshairs of educational inequity. It illuminates the lurking shadows of unequal access, opportunities, or resources but also serves to spotlight the potential reservoir of untapped talent and intellectual prowess in a segment that is vital for the advancement of a diversified and inclusive society.

In 2014, ownership rates for Black men under the age of 35 were 13% while White men were 35.3%.

Painting a stark portrait of racial disparity in asset acquisition, the 2014 statistic revealing a much lower home ownership rate among young black men, 13%, in contrast to their white counterparts, 35.3%, serves as a critical talking point in the broader discussion of young black male statistics. The rigidity of this ownership chasm not only underscores systemic socio-economic inequalities burdening this demographic but also compounds the challenges they face in wealth accumulation and achieving financial security. Thus, the statistic breathes life into a key facet of the narrative being examined, palpably demonstrating the myriad hurdles that young black men are compelled to reckon with in contemporary society.

Young Black males in 2020 earned 67.5% as much as their White counterparts.

In the discourse surrounding Young Black Male statistics, the finding that Young Black males in 2020 earned only 67.5% as much as their White counterparts sheds pivotal light. It underscores the persisting racial wage gap, acting as a stark reminder of the economic disparities entrenched in our society. This data point isn’t just about numbers; it’s about equality, opportunity, and the undeniable challenges young Black males face in navigating the economic landscape. As such, it raises pressing questions around social justice and policy reform, acting as a call to action for socioeconomic progress and equality.

As of 2020, the rate of HIV diagnoses among adult and adolescent Black/African American males was 6.7 times that of white males.

The towering disparity of 6.7 times higher incidence of HIV diagnoses among adult and adolescent Black/African American males compared to their white counterparts, as recorded in 2020, can serve as a striking and starkly contrasting illustration in any discourse on Young Black Male Statistics. This statistic underlines a grave health inequity present in our society, laying bare the woefully lopsided burden of HIV infection, which Black/African American males bear disproportionately. In a blog post about Young Black Male Statistics, this figure could thus serve as a rallying cry for an urgent call to action aimed at instituting preventative measures, ensuring equitable access to healthcare, and catalyzing decisive interventions to rectify this alarming racial health disparity.

In 2019, only 58% of Black men 25 and older had a high school diploma.

The percentage of Black men aged 25 and up who held high school diplomas in 2019, squaring at 58%, provides a critical benchmark in the broader narrative around Young Black Male Statistics. It offers a clear-cut optic into the current state of educational attainment among this demographic, underscoring both the progress made and the work left undone. This figure further contextualizes the interplay between race, gender, and socio-educational mobility, revealing the tangible extremities of educational disparity inherent in the system. Thus, it serves as an exigent call to action on enhancing educational policies and outreach efforts targeted towards young black men.

For the period 2015-2019, the homicide victimization rate for Black males was 32.32 per 100,000.

The cited statistic sheds light on a distressing reality; for the period 2015-2019, the homicide victimization rate for Black males stands at 32.32 per 100,000. This figure serves as a stark reminder of the perilous circumstances many young Black males find themselves navigating daily. It provides quantifiable evidence of the urgent need for comprehensive societal efforts to address inequities, a subject often explored in-depth in blog posts covering Young Black Male Statistics. It underscores the urgency for solutions that ensure safety, justice, and equal opportunities for this disproportionately at-risk population.

Black males comprised approximately 2% of educators in public schools in 2011–12.

Highlighting the figure of 2% representation of Black males in public education in 2011–12 provides stark insight into the scarcity of Black male role models within the teaching profession. As a focus point in a blog post about Young Black Male Statistics, this number underscores the potential lack of culturally responsive instruction and mentorship for young black males in schools. Furthermore, this percentage paints a sobering picture about diverse representation within the education workforce, which could impact identity formation and the academic achievement of young Black males. Without sufficient representation, these learners might struggle to relate to those charged with their educational growth, potentially influencing their outlook on education and their future life trajectories.

Conclusion

The statistics on young black males reveal both inspiring headway and lingering challenges. While there are encouraging upticks in high school graduation rates and lower rates of teen drug use, the numbers also show a disproportionate representation of young black males in the criminal justice system and a higher unemployment rate compared to their counterparts. Tackling the remaining disparities and building upon positive trends grant a clear direction for leaders, educators, and policymakers seeking to improve the quality of life for young black males.

References

0. – https://www.www.ncjrs.gov

1. – https://www.www.aps.org

2. – https://www.www.census.gov

3. – https://www.www.ussc.gov

4. – https://www.nces.ed.gov

5. – https://www.www.urban.org

6. – https://www.bjs.ojp.gov

7. – https://www.www.peoplespolicyproject.org

8. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

9. – https://www.www.pewresearch.org

10. – https://www.www.theguardian.com

11. – https://www.www.newsweek.com

12. – https://www.www.edweek.org

13. – https://www.www.bls.gov

FAQs

What is the percentage of young Black males enrolled in higher education in the U.S.?

As of 2020, approximately 34.9% of young Black males aged 18 to 24 were enrolled in college in the United States.

What are the high school graduation rates for young Black males in the U.S.?

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, the high school graduation rate for Black males was 69% in the 2018-2019 academic year.

What is the employment rate amongst young Black males in the United States?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of 2019, about 58.5% of Black males aged 20 to 24 were in the labor force.

What is the average income of young Black males in the U.S.?

The median personal income for Black males aged 25 to 34 was around $30,000 per year in 2019, as per the U.S. Census Bureau.

What percentage of young Black males live in poverty in the U.S.?

According to the U.S. Census Bureau in 2019, approximately 20.8% of Black males under the age of 18 lived in poverty.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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