GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Womens Health Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Womens Health Statistics

  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2019, the number one cause of death for women in the United States was heart disease.
  • As of 2015, approximately 13% of women in the US reported being in fair or poor health.
  • The World Health Organization states that depression is twice as common in women as in men.
  • Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women worldwide.
  • An estimated 1.1 million women worldwide were living with cervical cancer in 2018.
  • Approximately two-thirds of the 37 million people worldwide living with HIV are women.
  • The World Health Organization reported in 2018 that globally, 35% of women have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime.
  • In 2018, approximately 810 women died from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth worldwide every day.
  • At least 200 million women and girls have undergone some form of genital mutilation/cutting in 31 countries as reported by UNICEF in 2020.
  • Every minute in 2021, a woman dies from complications related to pregnancy or childbirth.
  • Among women ages 15 to 49 in the U.S., 55.8% use a contraceptive method.
  • Osteoporosis affects about 1 in 4 women and 1 in 20 men over the age of 50 worldwide.
  • 31.5% of women over 20 are obese in the U.S as of 2017-18.
  • Every year, an estimated 295,000 women die during and after pregnancy and childbirth; most of these deaths occur in low-resource settings.
  • About 10% of women (6.1 million) in the U.S have difficulty getting pregnant or carrying a pregnancy to term.
  • According to the World Health Organization, unipolar depression, predicted to be the second leading cause of global disability burden by 2020, is twice as common in women.
  • An estimated 6,000 women enter menopause each day in the U.S.
  • Approximately 90% of the women experience at least one premenstrual symptom.
  • According to the CDC, only about half (56%) of all women know that heart disease is their number 1 killer.

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Women’s health is undeniably one of the crucial topics requiring constant evaluation and attention in our global society. Our health system continually evolves as new advancements and issues emerge. This blog post will spotlight Women’s Health Statistics – a vast and vital field providing an empirical basis for policy decisions, health interventions, and targeted health programs. Delving into such statistics presents a unique opportunity to understand, analyze, and address the health disparities and common health concerns encountered by women worldwide. Through this meticulous exploration, we aim to promote informed discussions and proactive measures towards women’s health improvement.

The Latest Womens Health Statistics Unveiled

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2019, the number one cause of death for women in the United States was heart disease.

Amidst the vibrant tapestry of women’s health statistics, the gleaming thread of a dominant fact is starkly woven- heart disease stands as the apex predator, claiming its place as the leading cause of deaths among women in the United States, according to the 2019 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This powerful revelation underscores the crucial need for health initiatives and awareness campaigns, with a sharp focus on cardiovascular health, to pivot in response to this veritable threat. Far from being a mere point of academic interest, this statistic serves as a beacon, guiding our call to arms in promoting heart-healthy lifestyle choices, easy access to regular medical screenings, early detection mechanisms, and effective treatment methodologies, that can collectively reshape the narrative of women’s health and longevity.

As of 2015, approximately 13% of women in the US reported being in fair or poor health.

Unveiling trends in women’s health, this datum reveals a disquieting truth: as of 2015, approximately 13% of US women conceded being in fair or poor health. This statistic offers a critical avenue to delve deeper into issues impacting women’s health, underscoring the weight of healthcare strategies tailored to women. It serves as a barometer, gauging the efficacy of current health policies, lifestyle influence, or lack thereof, at the same time highlighting potential areas for health interventions and policy revisions. Ultimately, understanding this statistic empowers stakeholders to boost the health status and quality of life for women across the nation.

The World Health Organization states that depression is twice as common in women as in men.

In the riveting landscape of women’s health statistics, the World Health Organization’s revelation that depression is twice as common in women as in men creates a stir. This statistic underscores an pressing health disparity between the sexes, pointing to the reality that women are not only more susceptible to this debilitating mental illness, but also face unique challenges in their health journey. Consequently, it conveys an urgent call for reinvigorated efforts towards addressing mental health issues in women, and propagates the need for developing gender-specific strategies aimed at prevention, detection, and treatment of depression.

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women worldwide.

Undeniably, the statistic highlighting breast cancer as the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women globally casts a compelling light on the importance of prioritizing women’s health issues. It serves as a sobering reminder for readers, driving home the prevalence and potential danger lurking in the lives of females across the world. This knowledge should serve as a call-to-arms, promoting proactive health checks and emphasizing the necessity of regular breast screenings. Integrating this significant data point in a blog post on women’s health statistics underscores the urgent need for research, investment, and education in preventive strategies to combat this pervasive health threat.

An estimated 1.1 million women worldwide were living with cervical cancer in 2018.

Highlighting the statistic of an estimated 1.1 million women worldwide living with cervical cancer in 2018 paints a striking picture of one of the crucial health challenges women face today. This figure, representing a vast global population, underscores the urgent need for comprehensive healthcare solutions for women, including preventive measures, regular screenings, and effective treatments. In the broader context of women’s health statistics, this number emphasizes the significance of focusing on gender-specific illnesses and investing in research and interventions that could reverse such worrying trends in the future.

Approximately two-thirds of the 37 million people worldwide living with HIV are women.

Highlighting a statistic like ‘Approximately two-thirds of the 37 million people worldwide living with HIV are women’ in a blog post about Women’s Health Statistics can underscore the profound impact of this global health issue specifically on women. Illustrating the disproportionate burden faced by women in the fight against HIV, this statistic accentuates an often overlooked aspect of women’s health, further emphasizing that gender disparity exists in important health matters. Understanding this alarming ratio can help us to design better prevention, care, and treatment strategies and programs, perhaps contributing to greater health equality. Amazon Echo

The World Health Organization reported in 2018 that globally, 35% of women have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime.

Unraveling the intricacies of women’s health isn’t complete without delving into a grim reality encapsulated by a weighty statistic from the World Health Organization in 2018. An alarming 35% of women worldwide, report having faced either physical and/or sexual violence from an intimate partner or experienced sexual violence from a non-partner during their lifetime. The statistic unsettlingly reinforces the fact that violence, an issue of global concern, is a central risk factor that profoundly impacts women’s physical, mental, and emotional health. This harrowing revelation is a clarion call for coordinated international efforts to prioritize women’s safety and protect their health rights, making this statistic a vigorous, beating heart in any discussion around women’s health statistics.

In 2018, approximately 810 women died from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth worldwide every day.

Highlighting the alarming figure of approximately 810 women dying daily from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth in 2018 sets a critical tone in the discourse of Women’s Health Statistics. This startling number not only underpins the scale of the global health challenge we face but also underscores the urgency for action. It highlights the need for increased healthcare access, improvements in prenatal and postnatal care, and promotion of women’s rights, especially in developing countries. The statistic paints a stark picture about the intimate link between women’s health and their sociocultural, economic and political circumstances, thereby demanding our collective attention and proactive measures.

At least 200 million women and girls have undergone some form of genital mutilation/cutting in 31 countries as reported by UNICEF in 2020.

Highlighting the disturbing figure from UNICEF’s 2020 report—where over 200 million women and girls from 31 countries have experienced genital mutilation/cutting—casts a stark light on the pressing global health crisis for women. This alarming number not only underscores the pervasive nature of violations against women’s body autonomy but also raises pressing concerns regarding the psychological and physiological well-being of this vast group of untold girls and women. Consequently, the statistic serves as a call to action, urging for comprehensive medical and psychological support, legal measures, and societal change to eradicate such harmful practices and protect women’s health around the world.

Every minute in 2021, a woman dies from complications related to pregnancy or childbirth.

Painting a critical landscape in the arena of women’s health, the alarming statistic stating “Every minute in 2021, a woman dies from complications related to pregnancy or childbirth,” serves as a chilling wake-up call. It highlights the urgent necessity for improved maternal healthcare, particularly in regions where access to quality care is limited. Promoting awareness about these stark realities is important for stirring activism, possibly arousing policy changes, and impacting humanitarian efforts globally. Therefore, in a blog post discussing Women’s Health Statistics, this figure injects a crucial element of urgency, driving home the pressing need for healthcare advancements and reform in maternal care.

Among women ages 15 to 49 in the U.S., 55.8% use a contraceptive method.

Reflecting on the fact that 55.8% of women between the ages of 15 to 49 in the U.S. utilize a contraceptive method underscores the primacy of family planning in women’s health narratives. This percentage isn’t just a number, it speaks volumes about the heightened recognition and exercise of reproductive rights, awareness about sexual health, and the ability to make informed decisions regarding their own bodies. In the vast tapestry of women’s health, this constructive statistic acts as a clear testament to the progressive strides made in the realm of contraception, underlining its significance within the broader women’s health discourse.

Osteoporosis affects about 1 in 4 women and 1 in 20 men over the age of 50 worldwide.

Highlighting the substantial impact of osteoporosis on women’s health, particularly amongst those over the age of 50, stands as a potent testament to the broader gender-health discrepancy across the globe. The observed ratio of 1 in 4 women affected, compared to a relatively smaller fraction of 1 in 20 men, brings into sharp relief the unique health challenges faced by the female demographic. It underscores the importance of specific healthcare initiatives and policies to be suitably oriented towards addressing inherent vulnerabilities and preventing disease onset, especially for conditions like osteoporosis, which have significantly higher propensity among women.

31.5% of women over 20 are obese in the U.S as of 2017-18.

Threaded within the tapestry of ongoing deliberations on women’s health statistics, the proposition disclosing that 31.5% of women over 20 stand on the obesity scale in the U.S. as of 2017-18, strikes a vital chord. Not simply expressive of a health issue, this percentage casts a magnifying lens on the profound implications for chronic health conditions, the nation’s healthcare system capacity and economic implications. This obesity statistic emerges as a significant spokesperson, unravelling narratives entwining dietary habits, socio-economic influences, lifestyle choices, genetic causes, and the effectiveness of public health interventions. It thereby forms an integral pivot for further discussions and understandings surrounding women’s health.

Every year, an estimated 295,000 women die during and after pregnancy and childbirth; most of these deaths occur in low-resource settings.

Illuminating the stark disparities in women’s health, the alarming figure of 295,000 annual maternal deaths casts a sobering light on the intricate interplay of health, wealth, and geography. Predominantly occurring in resource-poor environments, these fatalities attest to the life-or-death difference access to quality healthcare can make during pregnancy and childbirth. In addressing women’s health statistics, this chilling number serves as a potent reminder of the critical necessity for global action targeted towards ameliorating maternal care in underserved regions, and underscores the urgent need for greater investment in alleviating health inequalities, hence, fostering a more equitable world.

About 10% of women (6.1 million) in the U.S have difficulty getting pregnant or carrying a pregnancy to term.

Delving into the realm of Women’s Health Statistics, it’s crucial to be conscious of the fact that approximately 10% of women (6.1 million) in the U.S experience challenges with either getting pregnant or successfully carrying a pregnancy full term. This striking figure underscores the reality and prevalence of fertility struggles amongst women; a crucial component of women’s health that often goes unspoken. Beyond highlighting the sheer volume of women grappling with these issues, it also draws necessary attention to the need for further research, understanding and support in the area of women’s reproductive health. Thus, the statistic is a stellar fulcrum around which conversations can pivot, from mere figures to real-life implications in the pursuit of women’s health.

According to the World Health Organization, unipolar depression, predicted to be the second leading cause of global disability burden by 2020, is twice as common in women.

Highlighting the looming specter of unipolar depression, anticipated by the World Health Organization to ascend as the second foremost global disability burden by 2020, paints a stark backdrop for a talk on Women’s Health Statistics. The fact that this gloomy dusk creeps twice as rapidly in women starkly demonstrates the unequal burden of mental health illness borne by women. This showcases the urgency of allocating more resources, research, and public discourse to mental health’s gender disparities. The fight for women’s health thus gains another dimension requiring comprehensive exploration.

An estimated 6,000 women enter menopause each day in the U.S.

Tossing the facts right under the spotlight, the scale at which women in the U.S. transition into the menopausal phase is staggering, with a daily estimate of 6,000 women joining in. This figure, not only paints a definitive picture of the widespread demographic shift in women’s health, but it earnestly calls into attention the heightened health concerns, intensified medical needs, and lifestyle changes, tied inextricably to this natural biological process. As we chart the course of Women’s Health Statistics, it becomes vital to unravel and address the multifaceted aspects of menopause, thereby enhancing the quality of care, understanding, and support offered to women nationwide.

Approximately 90% of the women experience at least one premenstrual symptom.

Woven into the everyday tapestry of a woman’s well-being, understanding the prevalence of premenstrual symptoms represents a pivotal chapter in comprehending her health narrative. The statistic that approximately 90% of women endure at least one premenstrual symptom highlights the shared nature of this experience, eliminating the misconception of it being a mere private inconvenience for a few. It raises a critical call to infuse menstrual health conversations into mainstream medical dialogues. Moreover, it underscores the need for proactive measures – such as symptom management, a supportive environment, and tailored healthcare – to uphold the holistic health of 90% of the female population navigating through the cyclical tides of menstruation.

According to the CDC, only about half (56%) of all women know that heart disease is their number 1 killer.

Framing the heart of the matter in women’s health literacy, the fact that only 56% of women are privy to heart disease being their front-running health nemesis, as per the CDC, provides much-needed spice to our blog post on Women’s Health Statistics. This places in stark relief the dire need for comprehensive education and awareness about heart disease amid women. As crucial players in the complex healthcare ecosystem, women’s uninformed perceptions about this leading killer effectively highlights the potentially glaring gaps and blind spots in public health communications. The statistic underlines the urgency for intensifying preventive strategies, regular screenings, tailored treatments and robust rehabilitation measures, aimed at empowering women and driving down morbidity and mortality rates from heart disease.

Conclusion

Scrutinizing women’s health statistics reinforces the dire necessity of increased focus, resources, and research in this field. Creating comprehensive and targeted health policies, educational interventions, and preventive measures undoubtedly stem from understanding these data. Striking disparities exist in various areas such as heart disease, cancer, mental health, and reproductive health, which accentuates the intersectionality of gender, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity. Constantly updated, high-quality and nuanced data will essentially contribute to refining strategies and achieving the long-term goal of enhancing women’s health outcomes globally.

References

0. – https://www.www.unaids.org

1. – https://www.gco.iarc.fr

2. – https://www.www.unicef.org

3. – https://www.www.wcrf.org

4. – https://www.www.menopause.org

5. – https://www.www.who.int

6. – https://www.www.iofbonehealth.org

7. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

8. – https://www.www.unfpa.org

9. – https://www.www.kff.org

10. – https://www.www.guttmacher.org

FAQs

What is the leading cause of death among women?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the leading cause of death among women in the United States.

What is the recommended frequency for women to have mammograms to screen for breast cancer?

The American Cancer Society recommends that women aged 45 to 54 should have a mammogram every year, while women 55 and older should switch to mammograms every 2 years, or can continue yearly screening.

At what age should women start getting regular pap smears to screen for cervical cancer?

According to the American Cancer Society, women should start getting regular Pap tests at age 21.

How prevalent is mental health issues such as depression and anxiety among women?

Mental health issues are very prevalent among women. According to the World Health Organization, more than 264 million people worldwide suffer from depression and twice as many women than men are likely to be diagnosed with it.

How common is osteoporosis among women and at what age it typically occurs?

Osteoporosis is quite common among women. About one in two women over age 50 will break a bone because of osteoporosis, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. It can occur at any age, but it is most common in older women.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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