GITNUX REPORT 2024

Key Ulcerative Colitis Statistics: 907,000 Affected, Risk Factors Revealed

Uncovering Ulcerative Colitis: A Deep Dive into the Statistics of this Chronic Inflammatory Disease.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

Statistic 1

The risk of colorectal cancer in ulcerative colitis patients is 2% after 10 years, 8% after 20 years, and 18% after 30 years of disease.

Statistic 2

Approximately 25-40% of ulcerative colitis patients experience extraintestinal manifestations.

Statistic 3

The most common extraintestinal manifestation in ulcerative colitis is arthritis, affecting up to 30% of patients.

Statistic 4

The mortality rate for ulcerative colitis patients is about 1.2-1.5 times higher than the general population.

Statistic 5

The prevalence of primary sclerosing cholangitis in ulcerative colitis patients is 2.4-7.5%.

Statistic 6

About 10-40% of ulcerative colitis patients experience anemia.

Statistic 7

Approximately 10-15% of ulcerative colitis patients develop toxic megacolon during their disease course.

Statistic 8

About 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients experience extraintestinal manifestations before diagnosis.

Statistic 9

Approximately 10-15% of ulcerative colitis patients develop osteoporosis.

Statistic 10

About 30-40% of ulcerative colitis patients experience at least one extraintestinal manifestation during their disease course.

Statistic 11

Approximately 5-10% of ulcerative colitis patients develop primary sclerosing cholangitis.

Statistic 12

The risk of colorectal cancer in ulcerative colitis patients increases by 0.5-1% per year after 8-10 years of disease.

Statistic 13

Approximately 10-15% of ulcerative colitis patients develop deep vein thrombosis.

Statistic 14

About 5-10% of ulcerative colitis patients develop uveitis or episcleritis.

Statistic 15

About 10-15% of ulcerative colitis patients develop erythema nodosum.

Statistic 16

About 5-10% of ulcerative colitis patients develop pyoderma gangrenosum.

Statistic 17

Approximately 30-40% of ulcerative colitis patients experience anxiety or depression.

Statistic 18

About 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients experience sleep disturbances.

Statistic 19

Approximately 10-15% of ulcerative colitis patients develop ankylosing spondylitis.

Statistic 20

About 5-10% of ulcerative colitis patients develop primary sclerosing cholangitis-associated cholangiocarcinoma.

Statistic 21

The peak age of ulcerative colitis onset is between 15 and 30 years old.

Statistic 22

Ulcerative colitis affects men and women equally.

Statistic 23

Ulcerative colitis is more common in developed countries.

Statistic 24

The incidence of ulcerative colitis is highest in Scandinavia and the United Kingdom.

Statistic 25

About 10-15% of ulcerative colitis cases are diagnosed in people over 60 years old.

Statistic 26

The annual incidence of ulcerative colitis in children is approximately 2 per 100,000.

Statistic 27

The risk of developing ulcerative colitis is 2-4 times higher in Jewish populations compared to non-Jewish populations.

Statistic 28

Approximately 50% of ulcerative colitis patients experience at least one relapse per year.

Statistic 29

Approximately 30-50% of ulcerative colitis patients have proctitis (inflammation limited to the rectum).

Statistic 30

About 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients have left-sided colitis.

Statistic 31

Approximately 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients have extensive colitis or pancolitis.

Statistic 32

Approximately 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients experience weight loss at diagnosis.

Statistic 33

Approximately 30-40% of ulcerative colitis patients experience fatigue as a major symptom.

Statistic 34

The annual cost of ulcerative colitis in the United States is estimated to be $8.1-14.9 billion.

Statistic 35

The annual cost per patient for ulcerative colitis in the United States ranges from $8,900 to $10,900.

Statistic 36

Approximately 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients experience work disability during their disease course.

Statistic 37

Up to 20% of people with ulcerative colitis have a close relative with IBD.

Statistic 38

About 5-10% of ulcerative colitis patients have a family history of the disease.

Statistic 39

The risk of developing ulcerative colitis is 1.6% for first-degree relatives of patients with the disease.

Statistic 40

Approximately 15-20% of ulcerative colitis patients have a first-degree relative with IBD.

Statistic 41

The risk of developing ulcerative colitis is 0.5% for second-degree relatives of patients with the disease.

Statistic 42

The risk of developing ulcerative colitis is 6.6% for monozygotic twins if one twin has the disease.

Statistic 43

The risk of developing ulcerative colitis is 2.4% for dizygotic twins if one twin has the disease.

Statistic 44

Approximately 907,000 people in the United States are living with ulcerative colitis.

Statistic 45

The annual incidence of ulcerative colitis in North America ranges from 9 to 20 cases per 100,000 person-years.

Statistic 46

The prevalence of ulcerative colitis in Europe ranges from 4.9 to 505 per 100,000 people.

Statistic 47

Ulcerative colitis affects about 3 million people in Europe and North America combined.

Statistic 48

The annual incidence of ulcerative colitis in Asia and the Middle East ranges from 0.1 to 6.3 cases per 100,000 person-years.

Statistic 49

The prevalence of ulcerative colitis in North America ranges from 37.5 to 248.6 per 100,000 people.

Statistic 50

The prevalence of ulcerative colitis in Asia ranges from 4.9 to 168.3 per 100,000 people.

Statistic 51

The annual incidence of ulcerative colitis in Australia is approximately 17.4 cases per 100,000 person-years.

Statistic 52

The prevalence of ulcerative colitis in Africa ranges from 2.3 to 21.4 per 100,000 people.

Statistic 53

The annual incidence of ulcerative colitis in South America ranges from 0.74 to 6.76 cases per 100,000 person-years.

Statistic 54

The prevalence of ulcerative colitis in South America ranges from 0.99 to 44.3 per 100,000 people.

Statistic 55

The prevalence of ulcerative colitis in the Middle East ranges from 2.3 to 90.6 per 100,000 people.

Statistic 56

About 10-15% of people with ulcerative colitis have severe disease.

Statistic 57

About 5-10% of ulcerative colitis patients experience severe acute colitis requiring hospitalization.

Statistic 58

About 15-20% of ulcerative colitis patients require hospitalization within the first year of diagnosis.

Statistic 59

Approximately 30% of ulcerative colitis patients will require surgery within 10 years of diagnosis.

Statistic 60

Approximately 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients achieve long-term remission with medical treatment.

Statistic 61

Approximately 50% of ulcerative colitis patients achieve clinical remission with 5-aminosalicylate therapy.

Statistic 62

About 20-25% of ulcerative colitis patients require corticosteroid therapy within the first year of diagnosis.

Statistic 63

About 30-40% of ulcerative colitis patients require immunosuppressive therapy during their disease course.

Statistic 64

Approximately 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients require biologic therapy during their disease course.

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Summary

  • Approximately 907,000 people in the United States are living with ulcerative colitis.
  • The peak age of ulcerative colitis onset is between 15 and 30 years old.
  • Up to 20% of people with ulcerative colitis have a close relative with IBD.
  • Ulcerative colitis affects men and women equally.
  • The annual incidence of ulcerative colitis in North America ranges from 9 to 20 cases per 100,000 person-years.
  • Approximately 30% of ulcerative colitis patients will require surgery within 10 years of diagnosis.
  • The risk of colorectal cancer in ulcerative colitis patients is 2% after 10 years, 8% after 20 years, and 18% after 30 years of disease.
  • About 10-15% of people with ulcerative colitis have severe disease.
  • Ulcerative colitis is more common in developed countries.
  • The prevalence of ulcerative colitis in Europe ranges from 4.9 to 505 per 100,000 people.
  • Approximately 25-40% of ulcerative colitis patients experience extraintestinal manifestations.
  • The most common extraintestinal manifestation in ulcerative colitis is arthritis, affecting up to 30% of patients.
  • About 5-10% of ulcerative colitis patients have a family history of the disease.
  • The annual cost of ulcerative colitis in the United States is estimated to be $8.1-14.9 billion.
  • Approximately 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients achieve long-term remission with medical treatment.

Hold onto your hats, folks, because were diving deep into a world where statistics are more fascinating than fiction. Did you know that approximately 907,000 individuals in the US are busting some serious gut (literally) dealing with ulcerative colitis? From peeking at the peak age of onset to unraveling the familial ties within the inflammatory bowel disease community, get ready to be bowled over by the numbers in this rollercoaster ride of UC revelations.

Complications

  • The risk of colorectal cancer in ulcerative colitis patients is 2% after 10 years, 8% after 20 years, and 18% after 30 years of disease.
  • Approximately 25-40% of ulcerative colitis patients experience extraintestinal manifestations.
  • The most common extraintestinal manifestation in ulcerative colitis is arthritis, affecting up to 30% of patients.
  • The mortality rate for ulcerative colitis patients is about 1.2-1.5 times higher than the general population.
  • The prevalence of primary sclerosing cholangitis in ulcerative colitis patients is 2.4-7.5%.
  • About 10-40% of ulcerative colitis patients experience anemia.
  • Approximately 10-15% of ulcerative colitis patients develop toxic megacolon during their disease course.
  • About 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients experience extraintestinal manifestations before diagnosis.
  • Approximately 10-15% of ulcerative colitis patients develop osteoporosis.
  • About 30-40% of ulcerative colitis patients experience at least one extraintestinal manifestation during their disease course.
  • Approximately 5-10% of ulcerative colitis patients develop primary sclerosing cholangitis.
  • The risk of colorectal cancer in ulcerative colitis patients increases by 0.5-1% per year after 8-10 years of disease.
  • Approximately 10-15% of ulcerative colitis patients develop deep vein thrombosis.
  • About 5-10% of ulcerative colitis patients develop uveitis or episcleritis.
  • About 10-15% of ulcerative colitis patients develop erythema nodosum.
  • About 5-10% of ulcerative colitis patients develop pyoderma gangrenosum.
  • Approximately 30-40% of ulcerative colitis patients experience anxiety or depression.
  • About 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients experience sleep disturbances.
  • Approximately 10-15% of ulcerative colitis patients develop ankylosing spondylitis.
  • About 5-10% of ulcerative colitis patients develop primary sclerosing cholangitis-associated cholangiocarcinoma.

Interpretation

Ulcerative colitis: where the numbers paint a picture of a relentless battle within the body. From the creeping risk of colorectal cancer to the dance of extraintestinal manifestations like arthritis and anemia, this disease spares no corner. A mortality rate that hangs heavier on their shoulders, and a prevalence of complications like primary sclerosing cholangitis that add complexity to the fight. The statistics read like a novel of adversity, where each page turned reveals a new challenge waiting to be faced. In this world of percentages and probabilities, ulcerative colitis patients navigate a maze of uncertainties with resilience and courage, knowing that every statistic is a chapter in their unique story of survival.

Demographics

  • The peak age of ulcerative colitis onset is between 15 and 30 years old.
  • Ulcerative colitis affects men and women equally.
  • Ulcerative colitis is more common in developed countries.
  • The incidence of ulcerative colitis is highest in Scandinavia and the United Kingdom.
  • About 10-15% of ulcerative colitis cases are diagnosed in people over 60 years old.
  • The annual incidence of ulcerative colitis in children is approximately 2 per 100,000.
  • The risk of developing ulcerative colitis is 2-4 times higher in Jewish populations compared to non-Jewish populations.

Interpretation

Ulcerative colitis: the lifelong party crasher of guts, making its grand entrance between the rebellious teenage years and the slightly more responsible twenties. Equal opportunity misery-maker, it doesn't discriminate between genders, but seems to have a soft spot for those living the "good life" in developed countries, especially in the hipster havens of Scandinavia and the United Kingdom. And just when you thought you were safe, they say getting older is a privilege - but watch out, because ulcerative colitis might just sneak up on you in your golden years. It's like a rare collector's item in the pediatric world, with only 2 in 100,000 lucky winners each year. Who knew your heritage could up your risk factor? Jewish populations, you might want to keep an eye out for this uninvited guest crashing the gene pool party - apparently, you're 2-4 times more likely to receive a pesky RSVP.

Disease Course

  • Approximately 50% of ulcerative colitis patients experience at least one relapse per year.
  • Approximately 30-50% of ulcerative colitis patients have proctitis (inflammation limited to the rectum).
  • About 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients have left-sided colitis.
  • Approximately 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients have extensive colitis or pancolitis.
  • Approximately 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients experience weight loss at diagnosis.
  • Approximately 30-40% of ulcerative colitis patients experience fatigue as a major symptom.

Interpretation

Ulcerative Colitis, a most unruly guest in the house of the digestive system, seems to have a knack for creating a chaotic guest list. As if hosting a never-ending party, this inflammatory condition invites a diverse range of symptoms, from the local celebrity proctitis to the more extravagant extensive colitis. With an annual relapse rate that rivals a soap opera's cliffhangers, and a tendency to cause unwanted weight loss and fatigue, ulcerative colitis truly knows how to make its presence known. In this rollercoaster of a medical drama, the only certainty seems to be the unpredictable nature of this unwelcome disease.

Economic Impact

  • The annual cost of ulcerative colitis in the United States is estimated to be $8.1-14.9 billion.
  • The annual cost per patient for ulcerative colitis in the United States ranges from $8,900 to $10,900.
  • Approximately 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients experience work disability during their disease course.

Interpretation

Ulcerative colitis may have a pricey tag, with an annual cost in the US equivalent to splurging on luxury vacations or a fleet of designer handbags. At $8,900 to $10,900 per patient annually, dealing with this inflammatory bowel disease could make you wish bloating and diarrhea came with a discount. Add in the fact that about a quarter of patients might have to take an unplanned career detour due to work disability induced by the disease, and you've got a financial headache that not even the fanciest of pills can cure. It seems like colitis doesn't just cause inflammation in the gut, but also in the wallet!

Genetics

  • Up to 20% of people with ulcerative colitis have a close relative with IBD.
  • About 5-10% of ulcerative colitis patients have a family history of the disease.
  • The risk of developing ulcerative colitis is 1.6% for first-degree relatives of patients with the disease.
  • Approximately 15-20% of ulcerative colitis patients have a first-degree relative with IBD.
  • The risk of developing ulcerative colitis is 0.5% for second-degree relatives of patients with the disease.
  • The risk of developing ulcerative colitis is 6.6% for monozygotic twins if one twin has the disease.
  • The risk of developing ulcerative colitis is 2.4% for dizygotic twins if one twin has the disease.

Interpretation

In a world where genetics are like a family tree that just can't shake off its troublesome branches, these statistics on ulcerative colitis paint a compelling picture. It's like the disease is playing a game of genetic roulette - with up to 20% of sufferers having a family member with IBD, it's as if the condition has a secret handshake that gets passed down through generations. And let's not forget about the twins, where the risk of developing ulcerative colitis seems to be a cosmic coin toss, with monozygotic twins facing a 6.6% chance and dizygotic twins a 2.4% chance if one twin already has the disease. In this genetic drama, it's a case of 'who's next in line?' that keeps the medical inheritance plot thickening.

Prevalence

  • Approximately 907,000 people in the United States are living with ulcerative colitis.
  • The annual incidence of ulcerative colitis in North America ranges from 9 to 20 cases per 100,000 person-years.
  • The prevalence of ulcerative colitis in Europe ranges from 4.9 to 505 per 100,000 people.
  • Ulcerative colitis affects about 3 million people in Europe and North America combined.
  • The annual incidence of ulcerative colitis in Asia and the Middle East ranges from 0.1 to 6.3 cases per 100,000 person-years.
  • The prevalence of ulcerative colitis in North America ranges from 37.5 to 248.6 per 100,000 people.
  • The prevalence of ulcerative colitis in Asia ranges from 4.9 to 168.3 per 100,000 people.
  • The annual incidence of ulcerative colitis in Australia is approximately 17.4 cases per 100,000 person-years.
  • The prevalence of ulcerative colitis in Africa ranges from 2.3 to 21.4 per 100,000 people.
  • The annual incidence of ulcerative colitis in South America ranges from 0.74 to 6.76 cases per 100,000 person-years.
  • The prevalence of ulcerative colitis in South America ranges from 0.99 to 44.3 per 100,000 people.
  • The prevalence of ulcerative colitis in the Middle East ranges from 2.3 to 90.6 per 100,000 people.

Interpretation

Ulcerative colitis seems to have spread its roots far and wide, becoming a truly global concern with statistics showing it's making its presence felt in every corner of the world. With numbers ranging from the relatively modest to the strikingly high, it's clear that this inflammatory bowel disease doesn't discriminate based on geography. It's as if ulcerative colitis is on a determined mission to ensure that no continent is left untouched by its disruptive influence on the lives of millions. This just goes to show that when it comes to digestive disorders, ulcerative colitis doesn't believe in boundaries – it's an equal-opportunity troublemaker that demands attention and awareness on a worldwide scale.

Severity

  • About 10-15% of people with ulcerative colitis have severe disease.
  • About 5-10% of ulcerative colitis patients experience severe acute colitis requiring hospitalization.
  • About 15-20% of ulcerative colitis patients require hospitalization within the first year of diagnosis.

Interpretation

Ulcerative colitis, a condition known for turning even the strongest of stomachs upside down, seems to have a proclivity for the dramatic. With about 10-15% of sufferers experiencing a severe case of the intestinal blues, and a whopping 15-20% needing a hospital pit stop within the first year of diagnosis, it's clear that this disease doesn't do anything halfway. Perhaps it's just asserting its presence in the world of gastrointestinal disorders or making sure to keep hospitals on their toes – either way, ulcerative colitis is not one to be ignored.

Treatment

  • Approximately 30% of ulcerative colitis patients will require surgery within 10 years of diagnosis.
  • Approximately 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients achieve long-term remission with medical treatment.
  • Approximately 50% of ulcerative colitis patients achieve clinical remission with 5-aminosalicylate therapy.
  • About 20-25% of ulcerative colitis patients require corticosteroid therapy within the first year of diagnosis.
  • About 30-40% of ulcerative colitis patients require immunosuppressive therapy during their disease course.
  • Approximately 20-30% of ulcerative colitis patients require biologic therapy during their disease course.

Interpretation

In the tumultuous world of ulcerative colitis management, statistics paint a picture of uncertainty and resilience. With a surgical shadow looming over 30% of patients within a decade, the battleground shifts to medical treatments. From the elusive long-term remission (granted to only a brave 20-30%) to the promising dawn of clinical remission under 5-aminosalicylate therapy (embraced by half of the warriors), each victory and setback shapes the narrative. Corticosteroid cavalry rides in for a quarter of the troops in the initial skirmish, while the immunosuppressive support group and biologic breakthroughs await the call to arms for 30-40% and 20-30%, respectively. In a war where the players are both patient and strategist, the journey is unpredictable, but the fight for a peaceful gut rages on.

References