GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Fifa World Cup Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Fifa World Cup Statistics

  • The World Cup has been held 21 times, from 1930 to 2018.
  • Brazil has won the FIFA World Cup 5 times, the most by any country.
  • The 1994 World Cup held in the United States had the highest average attendance, with over 68,000 per match.
  • The fastest goal in World Cup history was scored by Hakan Şükür of Turkey 11 seconds into the match.
  • The 2002 World Cup in Korea/Japan was the first to be hosted by two countries.
  • 32 teams have participated in the World Cup since 1998.
  • The highest number of goals scored by a team in a single World Cup tournament is 27 by Hungary in 1954.
  • The most goals scored by a player in World Cup tournaments is 16 by Miroslav Klose of Germany.
  • The 2018 World Cup in Russia had a global in-home television audience of 3.572 billion viewers.
  • In 2006, about 2 million football fans attended the World Cup in Germany.
  • The World Cup finals game with the most goals was in 1954, with 12 scored in the Switzerland vs Austria match.
  • No country from Africa or Asia has won the World Cup.
  • The youngest player to ever play in a World Cup match was Norman Whiteside of Northern Ireland, who was 17 years and 41 days old in 1982.
  • In the 2018 World Cup, over 3.3 million tickets were allocated either to fans or national associations.
  • The first World Cup held in 1930 in Uruguay had only 13 teams.
  • The 1970 and 1986 World Cups were both hosted by Mexico, the first country to host the tournament twice.
  • Benito Mussolini used the 1934 World Cup in Italy as a platform to promote Fascism.
  • Pele is the only player to have won three World Cups, in 1958, 1962 and 1970.
  • In the 1938 World Cup, Brazil and Czechoslovakia played the first ever match that needed extra time, ending in a 1-1 draw after 90 minutes.
  • The 2026 World Cup will be the first to feature 48 teams.

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Welcome to our in-depth exploration of FIFA World Cup Statistics, a thrilling world where the unpredictability of the beautiful game meets the predictability of numbers. In this informative blog post, we will delve into an array of historical data encompassing every tournament since the inception of the World Cup in 1930. Shedding light on team performances, individual triumphs, breathtaking records, and intriguing trends, our analysis aims to satiate dedicated sports enthusiasts, seasoned statisticians, and casual readers alike. Fasten your seatbelts as we unpack the captivating world of football statistics, offering a unique perspective on the controversies, triumphs, and fascinating stories behind the world’s most popular sporting event.

The Latest Fifa World Cup Statistics Unveiled

The World Cup has been held 21 times, from 1930 to 2018.

Immersing ourselves in the fascinating kaleidoscope of FIFA World Cup history, we trace its roots back to 1930, a time when football was still solidifying its foothold in the global sports arena. Up until 2018, it has morphed into the monument of competition it is today, thundering its way across the world 21 times. This narrative not only feeds our nostalgia but also maps out a timeline against which we can plot the evolution of the tournament, track the dominance of footballing powerhouses through the decades, and analyse patterns or trends in the gameplay. Thus, breathing life into our blog post about FIFA World Cup statistics.

Brazil has won the FIFA World Cup 5 times, the most by any country.

Displaying the prowess of Brazilian football, the statistic that Brazil has clinched the title of the FIFA World Cup five times – a record high – illustrates their dominance and richness in the sport’s history. This illuminating data uncovers a narrative of perennial success and sets an unrivaled benchmark for other teams on the global stage. In the context of a post about FIFA World Cup Statistics, this fact forms a quintessential cornerstone, painting a broader picture of the competition’s panorama, and allowing readers to appreciate the magnitude of the achievements some nations have managed to secure in this universally popular event.

The 1994 World Cup held in the United States had the highest average attendance, with over 68,000 per match.

Highlighting the record-breaking average attendance of over 68,000 spectators per match at the 1994 World Cup event in the U.S underscores the global appeal and unparalleled fan participation FIFA World Cups hold. In a blog post focused on World Cup statistics, it provides tangible evidence of the event’s drawing power. By illustrating the unprecedented magnitude of fan engagement in this tournament, it underscores the value and acclaim this sporting event carries worldwide, proving the World Cup’s ability to captivate international audience and setting the 1994 World Cup apart as a landmark event in the history of the competition.

The fastest goal in World Cup history was scored by Hakan Şükür of Turkey 11 seconds into the match.

Diving into the ocean of Fifa World Cup statistics, one cannot resist the lure of a particular pearl — the fastest goal in World Cup history. Etched into the annals of soccer by Hakan Şükür of Turkey, this accomplishment brought the crowd to their feet just 11 seconds into the match. The sheer speed, the unexpected joy, the record-setting nature of Şükür’s goal lends itself to engrossing narratives, enabling bloggers to illustrate the dynamic and unpredictable nature of soccer. This statistic serves as a shining testament to individual talent, a wowing factor for readers, and a stark reminder that in the game of soccer, every second counts.

The 2002 World Cup in Korea/Japan was the first to be hosted by two countries.

Shining a light on the shared hosting of the 2002 World Cup by Korea and Japan, one can appreciate it as a significant waypoint in the rich tapestry of FIFA World Cup history. It stands as the inaugural instance where the world’s most prestigious soccer tournament was co-hosted, breaking the tradition of a single host nation. This historic collaboration not only expanded the logistical sphere of the tournament by involving the efforts of two countries, but also served as a model for potential future partnerships in hosting international sporting events. With higher resources, more stadiums and larger fan involvement, this statistic is a pivotal moment in shaping the evolution of World Cup tournaments.

32 teams have participated in the World Cup since 1998.

Delving into the expanse of FIFA World Cup statistics, the revelation that 32 teams have consistently participated in the tournament since 1998 offers a fascinating glimpse into the competition’s scope and inclusivity. This figure doesn’t just reflect the number of nations battling for the coveted trophy, but also symbolises the diverse tapestry of cultures put on display every four years. It underscores the tournament’s expansion, reflecting the global passion for football, and providing a quantitative measure of its growing reach and influence. This numeric fact simultaneously embodies the competitive spirit, global unity, and inclusiveness that the World Cup fosters on an international scale.

The highest number of goals scored by a team in a single World Cup tournament is 27 by Hungary in 1954.

Illuminating the sheer offensive prowess exhibited in historical FIFA World Cup tournaments, the awe-inspiring feat of Hungary scoring an unrivaled 27 goals in the 1954 competition stands as an unchallenged benchmark. This remarkable statistic serves as a testament to ferocious attacking strategies, offering a glimpse into the tactical finesse and relentless playstyle that enabled such an achievement. In the realm of FIFA World Cup statistics, this memorable record not only presents an intriguing insight into past prowess, but also establishes an alluring target for ambitious teams eyeing greatness in future tournaments.

The most goals scored by a player in World Cup tournaments is 16 by Miroslav Klose of Germany.

Highlighting Miroslav Klose’s record of 16 goals in World Cup tournaments offers a striking testament to individual athletic achievement within the context of global competition. It provides readers a tangible benchmark for identifying and comparing stellar performance throughout World Cup history. This statistic becomes an intriguing entry point into deeper discussions about player performance, tournament trends, and effective strategies. Furthermore, it sparks attention towards Germany’s consistent excellence in football, fostering a layer of national pride or rivalry, therefore enhancing the interactive quality of the blog post about Fifa World Cup Statistics.

The 2018 World Cup in Russia had a global in-home television audience of 3.572 billion viewers.

Highlighting the impressive statistic of the 2018 World Cup in Russia drawing a massive in-home television audience of 3.572 billion viewers underscores the truly global appeal and vast reach of this event. For a blog post about FIFA World Cup statistics, this figure not only speaks volumes about the immense popularity of this sporting event and its power to gather billions around a shared passion, but it also reflects significant implications in terms of advertising, broadcast rights and potential viewership future growth. This goes to show just how captivating the World Cup can be, promising continued international appeal in the tournaments to come.

In 2006, about 2 million football fans attended the World Cup in Germany.

The allure of the World Cup resides not only in the beauty of the sport but also in the magnitude of its global audience. Emphasizing this, the sizable attendance of about 2 million football fans at the World Cup hosted by Germany in 2006 emerges as a testament to football’s widespread appeal. This figure, far from being merely numerical, weaves itself into the broader tapestry of Fifa World Cup history. It illustrates the event’s immense attraction and its ability to cross borders and cultures, converging millions from around the world into a shared spectacle of football. Therefore, this 2006 attendance figure helps enrich a blog post about Fifa World Cup statistics—painting a vivid picture of the event’s undeniable global charm and massive audience engagement, a facet of the event that statistics can often bring to life.

The World Cup finals game with the most goals was in 1954, with 12 scored in the Switzerland vs Austria match.

Highlighting the explosive 1954 World Cup finals game between Switzerland and Austria, that tallied up to an unparalleled 12 goals, offers the readers a momentous event in the World Cup history. This insight not only underpins the unpredictable and thrilling nature of the tournament, but it also sets a benchmark against which subsequent matches can be compared. In addition, it denotes the high-scoring potential games sometimes have, underlining the importance of both offensive and defensive strategies in the World Cup tournaments. Thus, it presents a fruitful avenue for discussion, analysis, and comparison when delving deeper into the fascinating world of FIFA World Cup statistics.

No country from Africa or Asia has won the World Cup.

Highlighting the statistic that no country from Africa or Asia has ever claimed victory in the FIFA World Cup serves as a substantial point of interest in our examination of World Cup history. It underlines the geographic domination by European and South American teams, spawning riveting discussions on patterns of power in international soccer. This statistic, when woven into a larger narrative about global soccer dynamics, profoundly shapes our understanding of the game, offering an intriguing perspective on the complex interplay between sport, geography, and socio-cultural factors in shaping footballing fortunes at the World Cup.

The youngest player to ever play in a World Cup match was Norman Whiteside of Northern Ireland, who was 17 years and 41 days old in 1982.

Showcasing extraordinary feats and enthralling records has always been a thrilling aspect of FIFA World Cup statistics. The tale of Norman Whiteside of Northern Ireland, who set foot on the pitch as the youngest player in any World Cup match at just 17 years and 41 days old in 1982, stands out in this arena. This remarkable feat emphasizes the incredible talent and fortitude possessed by these young athletes, who at such tender stages of their lives, compete on the world’s most prestigious football stage. It serves as a testament to the boundless opportunities and varying age groups within the world of football, further enriching our understanding of the diversity embedded within the games of FIFA World Cup.

In the 2018 World Cup, over 3.3 million tickets were allocated either to fans or national associations.

Embedding the realization of the far-reaching impact of the FIFA World Cup, the statistic stating the allocation of over 3.3 million tickets to fans or national associations during the 2018 event opens an eye-catching panorama. This vast figure not only quantifies global engagement and interest levels in such international sporting fiestas, but it also offers a glimpse into the pulsating socio-economic engine driving this mega event; from revenue generation through ticket sales to indirect boosts to tourism and hospitality sectors. Furthermore, it punctuates the scale of logistical planning and infrastructure investment required by host nations, making it a keenly observed benchmark in the FIFA World Cup narrative.

The first World Cup held in 1930 in Uruguay had only 13 teams.

In a voyage through the captivating chronicle of FIFA World Cup statistics, one significant landmark stands out. The inaugural World Cup, held in Uruguay in 1930, had a quaint assembly of just 13 teams. This figure offers a glimpse into the humble origins of the world’s most celebrated football tournament, sparking intrigue regarding its evolution over the decades. Tracing the shift from this initial baker’s dozen to the present-day field of 32 teams paints a vivid picture of the global growth and increased inclusivity of the sport, and enhances understanding of the diversity and dynamics that make the World Cup truly a global spectacle.

The 1970 and 1986 World Cups were both hosted by Mexico, the first country to host the tournament twice.

Highlighting Mexico’s distinguished position as the first nation to host the World Cup tournament twice, in 1970 and 1986, underscores a noteworthy chapter in FIFA World Cup history, wherein visibility is given to the evolution of the tournament’s global distribution. It further mirrors FIFA’s faith in Mexico’s ability to stage a large-scale international event twice over, an aspect that can drive a more in-depth analysis into the factors that make for successful hosting, including infrastructural readiness, audience receptiveness, and football culture. This statistic may serve not only as an exciting trivia nugget but also as a springboard for broader discussions around hosting nations’ contributions to the World Cup narrative.

Benito Mussolini used the 1934 World Cup in Italy as a platform to promote Fascism.

In the context of a FIFA World Cup statistics blog post, the role of the 1934 World Cup in Italy under Benito Mussolini’s rule presents an intriguing angle. It reveals how the prestigious global event was not only a sporting competition but also a political tool, demonstrating the far-reaching implications of the World Cup beyond the football field. Mussolini’s use of this tournament to propagate his ideologies underscores how we cannot separate World Cup statistics from broader socio-political narratives, hence it becomes essential to analyze these statistical insights through a wider lens.

Pele is the only player to have won three World Cups, in 1958, 1962 and 1970.

In the grand saga of FIFA World Cup trivia, one gem worth highlighting is Pele’s unparalleled achievement of being the sole player to have captured three World Cup titles, accomplishing this feat in 1958, 1962 and 1970. This remarkable statistic underscores the kind of extraordinary talent and consistency required to not just make it to the World Cup, but to ascend to the pinnacle of victory, not just once, but thrice. Pele’s achievement serves as a high watermark that continues to challenge individual players and national teams alike, adding a layer of mythical allure to the already intriguing World Cup narrative.

In the 1938 World Cup, Brazil and Czechoslovakia played the first ever match that needed extra time, ending in a 1-1 draw after 90 minutes.

Peering through the lens of FIFA World Cup statistics, one can’t overlook the historical significance of the 1938 Brazil vs Czechoslovakia match. It grandstands as the first match to tread beyond the traditional 90-minute stretch, inaugurating the concept of ‘extra time’ to the World Cup tournament. This unfolding event, which culminated in a 1-1 draw, not only intensified the competitive intrigue of the game but also triggered a transformation in the rules and strategies employed in future World Cup showdowns. Such a pivotal moment weaves into the ever-evolving narrative of World Cup statistics, cementing its importance in analysing the event’s progression.

The 2026 World Cup will be the first to feature 48 teams.

In the captivating world of FIFA World Cup statistics, the proclamation that the 2026 tournament will witness a ground-breaking change by accommodating 48 teams, instead of the conventional 32, promises a thrilling alteration in the landscape of milestones and records. This expansion reshapes the logistics, amplifies competitiveness, encourages diversity as more countries get the opportunity to showcase their talent, and ultimately impacts the rhythm of the most-awaited global football event. The statistical implications could be colossal, including modified averages, new highs and lows, altered probabilities and perhaps, unexpected outcomes—adding another layer of fascination to every football enthusiast’s love for crunching numbers.

Conclusion

A thorough analysis of FIFA World Cup statistics reveals significant shifts and patterns in the performance of teams across the globe. Many surprising facets come to light, such as the correlation between team rankings and their progression in the tournament, the impact of home advantage, and the evolution of goal scoring over the years. Understanding these statistics not only provides a detailed insight into the historical context of football but also plays a substantial role in predicting future World Cup outcomes. As such, FIFA World Cup statistics are a gold mine for football enthusiasts, statisticians, and predictors.

References

0. – https://www.www.fifa.com

FAQs

How often is the FIFA World Cup held?

The FIFA World Cup takes place every four years.

Which country has won the most World Cup titles?

As of the most current data, Brazil has won the most World Cup titles, with a total of five victories.

When and where was the first FIFA World Cup held?

The first FIFA World Cup was held in 1930 in Uruguay.

What is the highest scoring game in World Cup history?

The highest scoring game in World Cup history was in 1954 when Austria beat Switzerland 7-5.

Which country has appeared the most times in the World Cup final?

As of the most current data, Germany has appeared the most times in the World Cup final, with a total of 8 appearances.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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