GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Must-Know Self Harm Statistics [Recent Analysis]

Highlights: The Most Important Self Harm Statistics

  • About 17% of the population have self-harmed at some point in their lives.
  • Approximately 90% of people who self-harm begin during their teenage years.
  • Females are more likely to self-harm than males, with a ratio of about 3:1.
  • Between 13% and 23.2% of adolescents self-harm worldwide.
  • The most common method of self-harm among adolescents is cutting.
  • Nearly 53% of individuals who self-harm started doing so before the age of 17.
  • The prevalence of self-harm among females aged 16-24 is 19.7%.
  • About 50% of adolescents who self-harm stop within five years of starting.
  • More than half (54%) of adolescents who self-harm say they only do it once or a few times.
  • Approximately 15% of college students have a history of self-harm.
  • About 12% of teens who report self-harming behaviors have an underlying mental health condition.
  • Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is most common among individuals aged 14-24.
  • Approximately 87% of adults who self-harm report using multiple methods.
  • 50-75% of individuals who have engaged in self-harm report having attempted suicide at least once.
  • Nearly 80% of self-harm episodes are not medically treated.
  • about 1 in 40 adults have engaged in self-harm without suicidal intention in the past year.

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Self-harm affects millions globally. Recent data shows 17% of people have self-harmed, with 90% starting in their teens. Females self-harm more than males at a 3:1 ratio. Between 13% and 23.2% of adolescents worldwide self-harm. Cutting is the most prevalent method, but others like burning exist. About 70% of self-harmers attempt suicide.

53% begin self-harming before age 17, and 19.7% start between 16–24 years. 50-75% have attempted suicide once, yet 80% avoid medical care due to stigma related to mental health issues like depression. 1 in 40 adults reported non-suicidal self-harm last year, as per the National Institute Of Mental Health. Let’s take a closer look at the most important statistics about self-harm.

Self Harm Statistics Overview

Females are more likely to self-harm than males, with a ratio of about 3:1.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the disproportionate burden of self-harm that falls on women. It highlights the need for greater awareness and understanding of the issue, as well as more targeted support for those affected.

Between 13% and 23.2% of adolescents self-harm worldwide.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of self-harm among adolescents worldwide. It highlights the need for greater awareness and understanding of the issue, as well as the need for more effective prevention and intervention strategies.

The most common method of self-harm among adolescents is cutting.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of self-harm among adolescents, and serves as a call to action for those who are in a position to help. It highlights the need for greater awareness and understanding of the issue, as well as the need for more resources to be made available to those who are struggling.

Nearly 53% of individuals who self-harm started doing so before the age of 17.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of self-harm among young people. It highlights the need for greater awareness and understanding of the issue, as well as the need for more resources to be made available to those affected. It also serves as a call to action for parents, teachers, and other adults to be more vigilant in recognizing the signs of self-harm and providing support to those in need.

The prevalence of self-harm among females aged 16-24 is 19.7%.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of self-harm among young women. It highlights the need for greater awareness and understanding of the issue, as well as the need for more resources to help those affected.

About 50% of adolescents who self-harm stop within five years of starting.

This statistic is a beacon of hope for those struggling with self-harm, showing that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. It demonstrates that, with the right support, it is possible to break the cycle of self-harm and move towards a healthier future. This statistic is a reminder that recovery is possible and that there is hope for those who are struggling.

More than half (54%) of adolescents who self-harm say they only do it once or a few times.

This statistic is significant in the context of a blog post about Self Harm Statistics because it highlights the fact that self-harm is not necessarily a long-term issue for many adolescents. It suggests that, for the majority of those who self-harm, it is a short-term coping mechanism rather than a chronic problem. This is an important point to make in order to provide a more balanced view of self-harm and to emphasize that it is not necessarily a sign of a deeper mental health issue.

Approximately 15% of college students have a history of self-harm.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of self-harm among college students. It serves as a reminder that self-harm is a serious issue that needs to be addressed, and that it is not something that should be taken lightly. It is important to be aware of this statistic in order to better understand the scope of the problem and to be able to provide the necessary support and resources to those who are struggling.

About 12% of teens who report self-harming behaviors have an underlying mental health condition.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the importance of mental health awareness and the need to recognize the signs of mental health issues in teens. It highlights the fact that self-harming behaviors can be a sign of an underlying mental health condition, and that it is important to seek help if you or someone you know is exhibiting these behaviors.

Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is most common among individuals aged 14-24.

This statistic is a crucial reminder that young people are particularly vulnerable to self-harm. It highlights the need for increased awareness and support for those in this age group, as well as the importance of providing resources and education to help prevent and address NSSI.

Approximately 87% of adults who self-harm report using multiple methods.

This statistic is a powerful reminder that self-harm is a complex issue, and that many adults who engage in self-harm use multiple methods to do so. It highlights the need for comprehensive approaches to understanding and addressing self-harm, as well as the need for more research into the various methods used by those who self-harm.

50-75% of individuals who have engaged in self-harm report having attempted suicide at least once.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the potential consequences of self-harm. It highlights the fact that self-harm is not a harmless behavior, but rather a serious issue that can lead to more extreme measures such as suicide. This statistic serves as a warning to those who may be engaging in self-harm, and emphasizes the importance of seeking help and support.

Nearly 80% of self-harm episodes are not medically treated.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the reality of self-harm: that it is often not addressed with medical treatment. It highlights the need for greater awareness and understanding of self-harm, as well as more resources to help those who are struggling with it. It also serves as a call to action for those who are in a position to help, to ensure that those who are suffering from self-harm are provided with the necessary support and treatment.

about 1 in 40 adults have engaged in self-harm without suicidal intention in the past year.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of self-harm among adults, highlighting the need for greater awareness and understanding of this issue. It is a call to action for those who may be struggling with self-harm to seek help and for those around them to be more aware of the signs and symptoms. It also serves as a reminder that self-harm is not always a sign of suicidal intent, and that it can be a way of coping with difficult emotions.

Conclusion

The statistics presented in this blog post demonstrate the prevalence of self-harm among individuals of all ages, genders, and backgrounds. Self-harm is most common among adolescents aged 14 to 24, with females being more likely than males to engage in these behaviors. The most commonly used method for self-harming is cutting or scratching one’s skin; however, other methods such as burning or hitting oneself are also employed by those who struggle with mental health issues. Additionally, many people who have engaged in self-harm report having attempted suicide at least once before and nearly 80% do not seek medical treatment after an episode occurs. It is clear that there needs to be greater awareness about the issue of self-harm so that appropriate interventions can be put into place for those affected by it.

References

0. – https://www.selfinjury.com

1. – https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk

2. – https://www.samhsa.gov

3. – https://www.livescience.com

4. – https://www.cam.ac.uk

5. – https://www.nimh.nih.gov

6. – https://www.teens.webmd.com

7. – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

FAQs

What is the prevalence of self-harm among adolescents?

The prevalence of self-harm among adolescents is approximately 17%, which suggests that 1 in 6 adolescents engages in self-injury.

What are the most common methods of self-harm?

The most common methods of self-harm include cutting, burning, scratching, hitting oneself, and deliberately preventing wounds from healing.

Are there any gender differences in self-harming behaviors?

Yes, there are gender differences in self-harming behaviors. Females are more likely to engage in self-harm, particularly cutting, whereas males tend to engage in more aggressive methods such as hitting themselves.

What are some risk factors associated with self-harm?

Risk factors for self-harm can include a history of abuse, mental health issues like depression and anxiety, low self-esteem, feelings of isolation, and substance abuse.

What are some effective interventions and treatments for individuals who self-harm?

Effective interventions and treatments for individuals who self-harm can include cognitive-behavioral therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, and other forms of psychotherapy, as well as support from friends, family, and mental health professionals.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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