GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Toronto Crime Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Toronto Crime Statistics

  • In 2018, there were 22,076 reported break and enter incidents in Toronto.
  • In 2019, violent crime rates in Toronto were 15% higher than the national average.
  • In 2020, Toronto reported 75 homicides.
  • In 2019, Toronto had the highest number of reported hate crimes in Canada with 139 instances.
  • Toronto's crime severity index was 73.7 in 2020.
  • In 2020, there were 2,322 reported incidents of motor vehicle theft in Toronto.
  • In 2017, Toronto reported approximately 13,086 cases of violent crime.
  • In 2019, the rate of firearm-related violent crimes in Toronto was 40.4 per 100,000 population.
  • From 2018 to 2019, there was a 7% increase in child pornography crimes reported in Toronto.
  • In 2018, Toronto had 371 instances of shootings involving injury or death.
  • In 2020, Toronto had a reported 98.3 robbery incidents per 100,000 population.
  • Toronto has seen a 353% increase in shootings since 2014.
  • In 2020, Toronto had a reported 2,207 assault incidents per 100,000 population.
  • In 2019, there were 462.7 property crimes per 10,000 residents in Toronto.
  • In 2018, there were 279 cases of sexual violations against children reported in Toronto.
  • In 2020, the crime rate in Toronto was 3,536 crimes per 100,000 people.
  • In Toronto, instances of fraud increased by 16% from 2018 to 2019.
  • In 2018, Toronto had 3,051 instances of drug crimes.
  • In 2018, there were 26,426 incidents of theft under $5,000 in Toronto.
  • In 2018, 3% of Toronto's general population reported being victims of violent crimes.

Table of Contents

As a bustling multicultural metropolis, Toronto offers a unique congregation of cultures, businesses, and recreational activities. However, like any other city, it faces its share of law enforcement challenges. This blog post delves into Toronto’s crime statistics, offering a critical analysis of crime rates across various categories, from minor offenses to major felonies. As a valuable guide to residents, tourists, policymakers, and law enforcement agencies, this blog will shed light on crime trends and frequencies, ultimately intended to paint a comprehensive picture of the city’s safety landscape.

The Latest Toronto Crime Statistics Unveiled

In 2018, there were 22,076 reported break and enter incidents in Toronto.

Painting a vivid picture of Toronto’s crime landscape, the statistic that identifies 22,076 reported break and enter incidents in Toronto in 2018 is pivotal. An integral part of the conversation about public safety, such alarming numbers speak volumes about the pressing need for strengthened preventive measures and more dedicated law enforcement. In the tapestry of Toronto Crime Statistics, this thread stands out, evidently reflecting the urgency to tackle property crimes, among others.

In 2019, violent crime rates in Toronto were 15% higher than the national average.

Numbers paint a grim picture involving Toronto’s safety belt, with the city witnessing violent crime rates scale new heights in 2019, eclipsing the national average by an unsettling 15%. Taking centre stage in a blog post delving into Toronto’s crime statistics, this striking figure bares the urgency with which the city needs to buck this trend and tackle its underlying causes. It provides context and helps readers discern the contrast between the local and national safety landscapes, thereby mapping the extent of the problem at hand, aiding in tracing its roots, and, most importantly, devising potent solutions.

In 2020, Toronto reported 75 homicides.

Interpreting the figure that Toronto recorded 75 homicides in 2020 provides a key measure of the city’s overall safety level and security condition that year, which is pivotal in our discourse on Toronto Crime Statistics. This single figure, stark in its evocation of earth-shaking moments making up this grim total, extends a gauntlet of understanding, challenging perceptions of the metropolis as a safe haven. In illuminating the conversation about crime trends, effectiveness of crime prevention initiatives, law enforcement performance, and even socio-economic issues in the city, the toll of these lost lives transcends the clinical count and underlines the urgency of concerted, sustained efforts to reduce such tragedies.

In 2019, Toronto had the highest number of reported hate crimes in Canada with 139 instances.

Illuminating the dark corners of an issue, the figure revealing that Toronto reported the highest instances of hate crimes in Canada in 2019 brings a candid perspective to the overall crime scenario in the city. A stark 139 cases, serving as a stark reminder of the societal fractures beneath the veneer of vibrant city life. Within the broader discourse of crime statistics in Toronto, this alarming number may spur discussions about the city’s environment, tolerance levels, and inclusivity while simultaneously drawing attention to areas that require immediate remedial measures. A key lens for informed policymaking, it underscores the importance of focused strategies to combat hate crimes and foster a safer urban habitat.

Toronto’s crime severity index was 73.7 in 2020.

Illuminating Toronto’s evolving safety landscape, the statistical revelation of a 73.7 crime severity index (CSI) in 2020 is pivotal. As a pen portrait of crime severity and volume, this index invites deeper analysis and rich discourse within any blog post centered around Toronto Crime Statistics. Tools like the CSI yield a nuanced understanding of crime trends, offering more than just a numerical depiction; it paints an intricate picture of societal imprints on crime. It also underscores areas of focus for law enforcement bodies and policymakers while empowering the public through transparency. So, the CSI refines the exploration of crime in Toronto, enriches public discourse, and reinforces intelligent crime strategies.

In 2020, there were 2,322 reported incidents of motor vehicle theft in Toronto.

Highlighting the figure of 2,322 reported motor vehicle theft incidents in Toronto for the year 2020 gives a tangible dimension to the city’s crime landscape, providing readers with essential information regarding the intensity and extent of this specific crime. By offering a quantitative representation of motor vehicle theft, the readers not only gain insights into the crime rate but it creates a framework for deeper understanding and discussion about public safety, law enforcement effectiveness, and the potential necessity for preventive measures or policies in the region. Ultimately, this statistic serves as a critical lens through which the broader topic of crime in Toronto can be examined within the blog post.

In 2017, Toronto reported approximately 13,086 cases of violent crime.

Unmasking the raw nerve of Toronto’s crime scenario, the startling figure of 13,086 violent crime incidents recorded in 2017 paints a vivid picture of the city’s safety profile. Within the tapestry of a blog post focused on Toronto’s Crime Statistics, this potent data point serves as a sobering mirror to the gravity and prevalence of violent crimes in the city. It not only provides readers a factual grounding to understand the city’s crime trends, but also acts as a yardstick, accentuating the need for effective crime prevention strategies and fueling conversations about public safety, law enforcement responses, and community resilience.

In 2019, the rate of firearm-related violent crimes in Toronto was 40.4 per 100,000 population.

Delving into the intricate labyrinth of Toronto’s crime statistics, the striking figure of 40.4 firearm-related violent crimes per 100,000 population in 2019 offers a startling yet insightful illumination. It serves as a revealing bookmark in the story of safety in Toronto, distilling the city’s convoluted tale of crime into a single, digestible, and undeniably compelling snapshot. This potent insight provides an indispensable context in understanding the magnitude and nature of violent events in the city. Further, by drawing a clear outline of gun-related violence in the context of overall crime dynamics, it not only guides an assessment of public safety measures but also influences policies intended to reduce the prevalence of such crimes, thereby shaping the direction of Toronto’s future.

From 2018 to 2019, there was a 7% increase in child pornography crimes reported in Toronto.

The indicated 7% rise in child pornography crimes reported in Toronto from 2018 to 2019 casts a concerning light on the city’s safety profile, particularly for children and young people. It offers both a stark warning and call to action within the context of Toronto’s crime statistics, underscoring the urgency to bolster prevention efforts, tighten law enforcement, reinforce child protection protocols, and strengthen community awareness to combat this distressing trend. It’s a statistic that punctuates the narrative of Toronto’s crime landscape, accentuating the critical need to confront and curb such abhorrent crimes.

In 2018, Toronto had 371 instances of shootings involving injury or death.

Peeling back the layers of Toronto’s crime data, the startling revelation of 371 instances of shootings involving injury or death in 2018 forms a crucial strand in the city’s complex crime tapestry. Painted against the broader backdrop of Toronto’s crime stats, this number significantly underscores shifting patterns of violence and raises pressing concerns about public safety. It provides concrete evidence to substantiate discussions on gun violence, weaving a tale of tragedy and urgency that could potentially fuel policy changes, law enforcement strategies and community response to crime. Thus, when unravelling the storyline of Toronto’s criminal landscape, ignoring this disturbing piece of the puzzle would render our narrative incomplete and our understanding insufficient.

In 2020, Toronto had a reported 98.3 robbery incidents per 100,000 population.

Shedding light on the city’s public safety situation, the statistic reveals that in 2020, Toronto experienced 98.3 robbery incidents per 100,000 population. This data, a critical barometer of crime levels, illustrates that even in Canada’s largest city, crime remains an issue of serious concern. By anchoring further exploration on the prevalence of crime, it can initiate conversations about necessary crime prevention measures, resource allocation for policing, and communal strategies for fostering a safer urban environment. With this in mind, the statistic underscores its role as a key measure in assessing safety, contributing significantly to understanding the broader crime landscape in Toronto.

Toronto has seen a 353% increase in shootings since 2014.

Highlighting an enormous surge of 353% in shootings since 2014 offers a stark revelation into the escalating issues of gun violence plaguing Toronto. In a blog post centered upon Toronto Crime Statistics, this figure punctuates the narrative with urgent reality, underscoring the urgency to address this public safety crisis. It becomes a compelling focal point, aiding in fostering a more in-depth discussion about causative factors, measures taken, and effectiveness of policy response. Moreover, viewers of this statistic are jolted into the grim reality, prompting heightened awareness, increased discourse, and a push for proactive measures towards crime mitigation in the city.

In 2020, Toronto had a reported 2,207 assault incidents per 100,000 population.

The heart of the metropolis, Toronto’s crime statistics, with a staggering figure of 2,207 assault incidents per 100,000 population in 2020, paints a vivid, albeit disquieting, picture of urban life. This specific number isn’t just a footnote in a vast data pool; instead, it offers a pivotal insight into the city’s public safety environment. Placed within a blog post about Toronto,’s crime statistics, it serves as a barometer of law enforcement efficiency, community security, and social solidarity. To the discerning reader, it underscores trends, behavioural patterns, and social undercurrents that make Toronto the bustling urban center it is. Despite its seemingly abstract nature, the statistic brings personal implications into sharp focus, significantly illuminating daily life for Toronto’s 2.93 million inhabitants.

In 2019, there were 462.7 property crimes per 10,000 residents in Toronto.

Unveiling the stark reality of Toronto’s safety landscape, the figure of 462.7 property crimes per 10,000 residents in 2019 illuminates the urgency of public vigilance and law enforcement innovation in combating city-wide thievery and destructiveness. This numeric disclosure is a key cog within an intricate sociodemographic machine, influencing perceptions about urban living, shaping housing decisions, guiding local security initiatives, and signalling to policymakers the need for substantive crime prevention strategies. Hence, a deep dive into Toronto Crime Statistics would be incomplete without shedding light on this piece of data, which aids in constructing a fuller portrait of the city’s convoluted interplay of safety, threat, and resilience.

In 2018, there were 279 cases of sexual violations against children reported in Toronto.

Peeling back the layers of Toronto’s crime data unveils some unsettling insights, particularly the startling figure of child sexual violations reported in 2018. This count of 279 cases not only embodies a critical public safety concern but also underscores the pervasive, hidden facets of criminal activity within a city acclaimed for its perceived safety. The discussion of such a statistic is crucial for a well-rounded exposition on crime statistics in Toronto, providing a valuable dimension to the narrative of crime in the city. It brings to light the pressing issues surrounding child protection, forms a basis for identifying trends, and potentially guides actionable steps aimed at eradicating such appalling offenses. Hence, as we dissect Toronto’s crime spectrum, this specific statistic is both a sobering reality check and a powerful tool for instigating meaningful socio-legal changes.

In 2020, the crime rate in Toronto was 3,536 crimes per 100,000 people.

The pulsating heart of Toronto’s landscape, captured by the statistic of 3,536 crimes per 100,000 people in 2020, offers a vivid snapshot of the city’s safety dynamics. It serves as an alert siren, sweeping through the hues of the safety canvas within the city’s intricate populace, thus significantly influencing the theme of a blog post about Toronto Crime Statistics. Underlining reality, it sketches an outline for discussions on crime prevalence, potentially guiding social policies, community alerts, law enforcement strategies, and safety precautions. Striking aloud, it underscores the urgency for interventions and fresh perspectives towards improving quality of life and public safety in Toronto.

In Toronto, instances of fraud increased by 16% from 2018 to 2019.

Spotlighting the menacing rise of financial deception, the 16% surge in fraud incidences in Toronto from 2018 to 2019 draws a chilling portrait of its inherent place within the broader crime landscape. Pouring over a variety of offenses in a blog post specifically designed to unpack Toronto’s crime statistics, it becomes impossible not to view this burgeoning deception as an alarming testament to growing criminal ingenuity and challenge facing law enforcement. The sharp upswing in fraud, a sophisticated misdeed, compels us to revisit and question our security measures, law implementation, and justice system’s effectiveness, becoming a crucial touchstone within the wider crime discussion.

In 2018, Toronto had 3,051 instances of drug crimes.

Delving into the realm of Toronto’s crime statistics, the echo of 3,051 drug-related crimes in 2018 emits a powerful resonance. It contributes a pivotal piece to the puzzle that constructs the broader picture of Toronto’s crime landscape in that specific year. When we consider the societal implications, the disruption caused to neighborhoods and families, this figure isn’t just a plain number, but a beckoning call to attention to drug-related challenges faced by law enforcement and policymakers. Transcending the digits, it paints a broader brushstroke on the canvas of crime prevention strategies and priorities, revealing an area requiring urgent and wholesome attention.

In 2018, there were 26,426 incidents of theft under $5,000 in Toronto.

Within the kaleidoscope of crime statistics from Toronto in 2018, the figure of 26,426 incidents of theft under $5,000 presents a startling narrative. It unveils a prevalent trend of minor thefts festering within the city’s norm, capturing the essence of an issue often overlooked by the mass focus on significant felonies. Furthermore, it instigates a discourse on a subtle yet pervasive facet of criminality, potentially impacting perceptions of safety, decision making on law enforcement strategies and resource allocation, as well as public policies. This figure acts as a touchstone for understanding the city’s crime disposition and evaluating efforts towards its containment. The snapshot of this particular statistic not only encapsulates the urban climate of the city in the year but also fuels crucial reflections on the effectiveness of ongoing preventive measures.

In 2018, 3% of Toronto’s general population reported being victims of violent crimes.

Shining a spotlight on the stark number that reveals in 2018, 3% of Toronto’s general population experienced violent crimes, enunciates the undeniable reality of the city’s safety concerns and crime rates. This data point is a critical cornerstone of the narrative, offering insight into the infractions that eats away at the sense of security among Toronto’s residents. Serving as a lens to examine the community’s vulnerability, it drives home the imperativeness of targeted interventions, just policy decisions and strategic law enforcement initiatives to bring about change. In a larger context, it paints a chilling picture of the real-time social issues, making it a key piece in the puzzle of Toronto crime statistics, breaking down the abstract notion of crime into personal, human experiences.

Conclusion

Toronto’s crime statistics reveal a dynamic and complex picture of safety in the city. While certain types of crimes have witnessed a decline over the years, others have risen, pointing towards the need for a stratified approach to public safety. These statistics underline the importance of continual monitoring, proactive strategies and community engagement in order to keep Toronto’s neighbourhoods safe. The data can serve as a barometer for policy-makers to adapt strategies that address specific criminal activities, thereby contributing to an overall safer community.

References

0. – https://www.nationalpost.com

1. – https://www.www.cbc.ca

2. – https://www.www150.statcan.gc.ca

3. – https://www.www.ctvnews.ca

4. – https://www.www.toronto.ca

5. – https://www.www.torontopolice.on.ca

6. – https://www.www.macrotrends.net

7. – https://www.wonder.cdc.gov

8. – https://www.torontosun.com

9. – https://www.www.680news.com

FAQs

What is the most common crime committed in Toronto?

The most common crime committed in Toronto varies by year, but typically incidents of theft, particularly theft under $5,000, is consistently high.

Has the crime rate in Toronto been increasing or decreasing in recent years?

The crime rate in Toronto tends to fluctuate. However, in the past few years, it has seen a slight increase, though it remains below the national average.

What areas in Toronto have the highest reported crime rates?

The neighborhoods with the highest reported crime rates can vary, but downtown Toronto traditionally has higher reported crime rates due to a denser population and more frequent reporting.

How does crime in Toronto compare to other major cities in Canada?

Despite being the largest city in Canada, Toronto's crime rate remains lower than several other major cities like Vancouver and Edmonton.

What efforts are being made to reduce crime in Toronto?

Multiple efforts are being made to reduce crime in Toronto, such as increased police presence in high-crime areas, community outreach programs, and initiatives focused on addressing the root causes of crime, such as poverty and lack of education.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents