GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Mexico City Crime Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Mexico City Crime Statistics

  • The crime index of Mexico City in 2021 was 65.50.
  • As of 2020, Mexico City has a homicide rate of 10.34 per 100,000 inhabitants.
  • In 2021, the number of reports of crime in Mexico City was almost 94,000, a decrease from over 110,000 reports in 2019.
  • As of 2020, Mexico City has a non-intentional homicide (traffic accidents) rate of 10.7 per 100,000 inhabitants.
  • In 2019, almost 32% of households in Mexico city reported being victims of burglary.
  • In 2021, around 67% of Mexico City's population felt unsafe living in their city.
  • There were over 13,500 reported cases of violent robbery in Mexico City in the first half of 2020.
  • As of 2020, Mexico City police reported an average of 37 daily allegations of sexual abuse.
  • In 2019, the crime rate in Mexico City was 76.61 per 1,000 residents, with theft being the most reported crime.

Table of Contents

Welcome to our latest comprehensive dive into Mexico City’s crime statistics. With Mexico City having a reputation for its high crime rates, it’s crucial to break down these intimidating figures to get a clear and true perspective. By analysing various crime variables ranging from petty theft cases to alarming violent crime rates, we hope to provide useful insights into the state of public safety in this iconic city. With our knowledge of statistical methodologies and interpretation, we aim to paint an accurate and unbiased picture of crime trends, frequency, and the overall safety conditions in Mexico City.

The Latest Mexico City Crime Statistics Unveiled

The crime index of Mexico City in 2021 was 65.50.

In the compelling saga of Mexico City’s crime narrative, the statistic of a crime index of 65.50 in 2021 serves as a salient landmark. With this stark figure, it paints a canvas of strife experienced by the city, quantifying the frequency and seriousness of crimes committed. This number not only fuels discussions on public safety, but it also feeds into larger dialogues about social conditions, law enforcement efficiency and policy directions. Hence, this unassuming digit is a potent catalyst; igniting deliberations, evaluations, and reflections on the multi-layered issue of crime in Mexico City.

As of 2020, Mexico City has a homicide rate of 10.34 per 100,000 inhabitants.

Delving into the dark side of Mexico City, as illuminated by the stark figure of a 10.34 per 100,000 inhabitants homicide rate, paints a vivid picture of its crime landscape. This specific rate, recorded in 2020, not only quantifies the prevalence of violent crime and presents a stark correlation to its public safety concerns, but it also provides a critical benchmark. It plays a pivotal role in comparison with global cities or prior years, appraising the effectivity of law enforcement measures, and gauging the level of risk for residents and potential travelers. Clearly, behind this rate lies the pulsating heart of a complex narrative on crime trends, safety measures, and societal impacts within Mexico’s most populous city.

In 2021, the number of reports of crime in Mexico City was almost 94,000, a decrease from over 110,000 reports in 2019.

Delving into the Mexico City crime stats, the cogent decrease in reported crime instances, from over 110,000 in 2019 to almost 94,000 in 2021, forms a crucial cornerstone of our analysis. Serving as a clear indicator of changing trends, these numbers symbolize a significant transformation in the tapestry of public safety in the city. By analyzing its finer details, we can glean insight into the effectiveness of law enforcement efforts, various socio-economic changes, and the overall climate of security in Mexico City. Not merely cold, hard numbers, these statistics represent the lived realities of the city’s residents and provide us with a roadmap to understanding the shifting contours of public safety within this bustling metropolis.

As of 2020, Mexico City has a non-intentional homicide (traffic accidents) rate of 10.7 per 100,000 inhabitants.

Unveiling the less-discussed face of crime figures, the 2020 non-intentional homicide rate in Mexico City, standing at 10.7 per 100,000 inhabitants primarily due to traffic accidents, casts a fresh, critical perspective on security and safety issues in the city. In dissecting these grim figures, readers are not only reminded of the potential danger lurking on the streets as a result of negligent driving, but also the need for robust road safety regulations, efficient enforcement, and public awareness to mitigate such preventable fatalities. This statistic serves as a poignant reminder that crime data isn’t just about violent acts, but encompasses a much broader, complex landscape. It helps build a comprehensive picture of Mexico City’s safety, extending the crime conversation beyond the typical incidents of theft, robbery, or assault.

In 2019, almost 32% of households in Mexico city reported being victims of burglary.

Highlighting that nearly one in three households in Mexico City reported instances of burglary in 2019 offers a startling reality check to the city’s crime situation. It underlines the prevalence of property-related incidents, positioning burglary as a pressing issue demanding immediate attention. In the bigger scope of Mexico City Crime Statistics blog post, this figure prompts thought-provoking discussions about safety levels, effectiveness of law enforcement, socio-economic factors influencing crime rates and potential policies to counteract this trend. More than just numbers on a page, these statistics amplify the voices of those affected, shaping a narrative that compels both citizens and authorities to proactively address and reduce crime.

In 2021, around 67% of Mexico City’s population felt unsafe living in their city.

In the realm of Mexico City Crime Statistics, the unsettling revelation that 67% of the city’s dwellers in 2021 felt unsafe resonates profoundly. It paints a stark picture of a metropolis grappling with rampant crime, where escalating fear shrouds community wellbeing and safety. By alarming policymakers, this data provokes a heightened sense of urgency to pinpoint the underlying issues and enact robust, comprehensive policies. Moreover, the pervasive sentiment of insecurity throws light on the community’s diminished trust in local law enforcement—a compelling driver for change within the security sector. Thus, this unsettling statistic gives the blog post a poignant perspective, emphasizing the human experience behind the numbers and underlining the pressing need to tackle crime in Mexico City.

There were over 13,500 reported cases of violent robbery in Mexico City in the first half of 2020.

Highlighting the staggering figure of over 13,500 reported instances of violent robbery in Mexico City within the first half of 2020 underscores the daunting reality of prevalent criminal activities within the metropolis. In a blog post focused on crime statistics in Mexico City, this data not only represents a critical juncture emphasizing the urgency of addressing public safety issues but also provides a stark point of reference to gauge the effectiveness of law enforcement efforts, and the necessity of policy reforms aimed at crime reduction. This troubling statistic implies pivotal implications for residents, potential travelers, policymakers, and stakeholders interested in the broader discourse on safety, tourism, investment, and public policy in the urban context of Mexico City.

As of 2020, Mexico City police reported an average of 37 daily allegations of sexual abuse.

Shedding light on the alarming rate of sexual abuse allegations in Mexico City, a chilling stat reveals that authorities register an average of 37 such complaints every single day. In the broader scope of a blog post detailing Mexico City’s crime statistics, this figure manifests the harsh reality of an ongoing and pervasive issue. It starkly underlines the city’s daily struggle against sexual crimes, emphasizing the urgency of implementing more effective countermeasures to protect victims and deter potential offenders. Additionally, it prompts readers to delve deeper into the societal factors fueling such widespread violence and to rethink current law enforcement and legal practices to address it.

In 2019, the crime rate in Mexico City was 76.61 per 1,000 residents, with theft being the most reported crime.

Painting a vivid picture of Mexico City’s criminal underbelly, the 2019 statistic of a crime rate sitting at 76.61 per 1,000 residents serves as an alarming revelator. The clutching tentacles of theft being the most reported crime increases its weight further. Within the context of a blog post about Mexico City Crime Statistics, it acts as a vital data point, serving to underline the gravity of criminal activity in the city. This insightful quantitative metric provides readers with a stark understanding of the city’s public safety scenario, aiding them in making informed decisions about visiting or residing there, while potentially driving discussions about safety improvements and crime prevention strategies.

Conclusion

Our detailed study of Mexico City’s crime statistics indicates a complex landscape of safety concerns. Despite a notable increase in investments in public safety efforts and law enforcement, the city continues to grapple with significant crime rates, most predominantly theft and violent crimes. Moreover, the data suggests that crime rates remain higher in densely populated boroughs, pointing to a correlation between population density and crime. Therefore, while an all-encompassing solution remains elusive, these findings clearly underpin the need for ongoing attention to socio-economic imbalances, heightened policing, and community engagement in addressing public safety-related issues.

References

0. – https://www.www.statista.com

1. – https://www.adnpolitico.com

2. – https://www.www.animalpolitico.com

3. – https://www.www.inegi.org.mx

4. – https://www.www.eluniversal.com.mx

5. – https://www.dataunodc.un.org

6. – https://www.www.datos.gob.mx

7. – https://www.www.numbeo.com

FAQs

What are the most common types of crimes in Mexico City?

The most common types of crimes in Mexico City are theft, especially pick-pocketing and vehicle-related thefts, as well as fraud, assault, and drug trafficking.

Has the crime rate in Mexico City been increasing or decreasing in recent years?

According to the latest data from the government, there has been a slight decline in certain crimes but an overall increase, particularly in violent crimes like homicides.

How does the crime rate in Mexico City compare to the rest of Mexico?

The crime rate in Mexico City is high compared to other major cities in Mexico, however, it's lower than in states like Guerrero and Colima, which have the highest crime rates in the country.

What are the reasons behind the high crime rates in Mexico City?

The high crime rates are attributed to factors like drug trafficking, poverty, corruption within local authorities, and high population density.

What measures are being taken to reduce crime in Mexico City?

Mexican authorities are implementing measures like improving policing strategies, focusing on community development, and cracking down on corruption. They are also working to reform the justice system, to reduce impunity and therefore deter crime.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents