GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

South Dakota Teenage Pregnancy Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important South Dakota Teenage Pregnancy Statistics

  • In 2017, South Dakota had a teen birth rate of 28.1 per 1,000 females aged 15–19 years.
  • In 2018, 263 out of 2317 births in South Dakota were to mothers under the age of 20.
  • The teenage birth rate in South Dakota declined by 33% from 57.7 per 1000 in 2006 to 38.6 per 1000 in 2014.
  • In 2020, the percent of high school students who ever had sexual intercourse was 38.3%, lower than the national average of 43.4%.
  • In 2017, grant programs in South Dakota helped avert 470 teen births, contributing to a savings of $3.0 million.
  • Compared to the national rate of 17.4 births per 1000 women aged 15-19 in 2018, the South Dakota state rate was 26.6 births per 1000 women aged 15-19.
  • The rate of teen pregnancy in South Dakota is higher in American Indian populations – 73 per 1,000 females aged 15 – 19 in 2013.
  • Between 2007 to 2017, the teen birth rate for girls aged 15 to 19 decreased by 57% in South Dakota.
  • In 2018, the South Dakota birth rate for women 15-19 was 28.21, meanwhile the national birth rate was 17.36.
  • South Dakota's 2014 teen pregnancy rates (ages 15-19) is approximately 40 in 1,000, compared to the national rate of 24 in 1,000.
  • In 2017, South Dakota's teen birth rate was 29.8 amongst 15–19 years old, higher than the national average of 18.8.
  • In 2017, the percent of high school students who used a condom during last sexual intercourse was 41.1%.
  • From 1991 to 2014, the teen birth rate dropped from 60.89 per 1,000 females to 33.56 in South Dakota.
  • Females in South Dakota aged 15–19, had a higher percentage (2.5%) of preterm births compared to the national average (2.0%) in 2016.
  • The pregnancy rate among females aged 15-19 was 50.3 per 1,000 in 2010, higher than the national rate of 34.2.
  • In 2016, 5.6% of all births in South Dakota were to teenage mothers between the ages of 15-19.
  • In 2011, South Dakota has a birth rate of 43.8 per 1,000 women aged 15–19.
  • Pregnancy and childbirth among adolescence (ages 19 and younger) contribute 20% of all medical expenses for births in South Dakota.
  • In 2016, 26.2% of all births in South Dakota were to teenage mothers aged 15-19, compared to the national average of 20.3%.
  • In 2010, 34% of all pregnancies in South Dakota occurred amongst women under the age of 20.
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The prevailing issue of teenage pregnancy is one that transcends all states, South Dakota included. This blog post delves into an analytical overview of South Dakota teenage pregnancy statistics, shedding light on the rate, demographics, contributing factors, and impacts. Understanding these statistics will provide an encompassing perspective on the magnitude of the problem, as well as inform policy makers, educators, parents, and teenagers on the necessary preventative and supportive measures to take.

The Latest South Dakota Teenage Pregnancy Statistics Unveiled

In 2017, South Dakota had a teen birth rate of 28.1 per 1,000 females aged 15–19 years.

Casting a spotlight on a crucial issue, the statistic that South Dakota has a teen birth rate of 28.1 per 1,000 females aged 15–19 years in 2017 throws into focus the magnitude of teenage pregnancies within the state. This striking figure provides a numerical roadmap for policymakers, health educators and community leaders to comprehend the urgency and severity of the situation. In the broader context of teenage pregnancy statistics, it provides a critical benchmark to evaluate the effectiveness of state-wide intervention strategies and evolved public health initiatives. Additionally, it accentuates the underlying societal, educational and economic factors that influence such rates, thereby prompting further explorations into its root causes and effects.

In 2018, 263 out of 2317 births in South Dakota were to mothers under the age of 20.

Such statistics are pivotal when discussing South Dakota’s teenage pregnancy landscape. They show that in 2018, a substantial 263 out of 2317 births were to young mothers aged less than 20, illustrating an undeniable presence of teen pregnancies in the state. This data could potentially indicate underlying issues regarding sex education and birth control accessibility. It could also fuel pertinent discussion about the societal and economic implications, considering the potential challenge this situation may pose to the affected young mothers juggling motherhood with education and career opportunities.

The teenage birth rate in South Dakota declined by 33% from 57.7 per 1000 in 2006 to 38.6 per 1000 in 2014.

Painting a riveting picture of the adolescent reproductive health landscape in South Dakota, the statistic vividly illustrates a noticeable 33% decline in teenage birth rate, plummeting from 57.7 per 1000 in 2006 to 38.6 per 1000 in 2014. This significant reduction breathes life into the effectiveness of policies, educational campaigns and support mechanisms targeted at reducing teenage pregnancy within this eight-year timeframe. As such, this transformational statistic offers a vital foothold in discussions surrounding the success factors of such interventions, and how they can potentially be replicated or fine-tuned to maintain this positive trend in teenage pregnancy control in South Dakota.

In 2020, the percent of high school students who ever had sexual intercourse was 38.3%, lower than the national average of 43.4%.

Delving into the 2020 figures illuminates an intriguing trend in South Dakota’s teenage landscape. The revelation that only 38.3% of high school students have ever had sexual intercourse, a figure notably beneath the national average of 43.4%, adds a unique dimension to the narrative about teenage pregnancy in the region. It allows us to appreciate the relative prudence of South Dakota’s youth compared to their nationwide peers, potentially contributing to a lower likelihood of teenage pregnancy. Accordingly, intervention strategies could be tailored around this behavioral pattern and thereby abet more effective prevention of teen pregnancy in South Dakota.

In 2017, grant programs in South Dakota helped avert 470 teen births, contributing to a savings of $3.0 million.

Delving into the heart of South Dakota’s Teenage Pregnancy Statistics, an elucidating piece of information shines a beacon of hope; In 2017, their grant programs effectively averted 470 teen births resulting in substantial savings of $3.0 million. This isn’t just a figure—it echoes the promise of fiscal responsibility alongside an indication of the initiative’s success in curtailing teenage pregnancies. It has an emphatic economic resonance, showcasing the pragmatic fiscal benefit derived from preventative measures. This ripple effect extends beyond dollars saved—it’s a testament to empowered South Dakota youth, a symbol of improved life outcomes, and a reflection of an anticipatory, proactive approach to societal issues.

Compared to the national rate of 17.4 births per 1000 women aged 15-19 in 2018, the South Dakota state rate was 26.6 births per 1000 women aged 15-19.

Anchoring the spotlight on South Dakota’s Teenage Pregnancy Statistics, the dramatic rise in the state’s birth rate for women aged 15-19 becomes undeniable. Set against the national barometer of 17.4 births per 1000 women within the same age range in 2018, South Dakota paints a starker picture with a higher rate of 26.6. The gravity of these numbers should not be casually dismissed. They flag a crucial issue requiring immediate attention – the need for enhanced education and services related to contraception and sexual health in South Dakota. It simultaneously offers insight into how socioeconomic factors and access to health care can impact reproductive choices, thereby shaping the state’s health, education, and social landscapes.

The rate of teen pregnancy in South Dakota is higher in American Indian populations – 73 per 1,000 females aged 15 – 19 in 2013.

In painting a clear picture of teenage pregnancy in South Dakota, this striking statistic provides crucial illumination. Revealing a disproportionately high rate of teenage pregnancies within the American Indian community at 73 out of 1,000 females aged 15-19 in 2013, it underscores an unnecessarily daunting and significant challenge faced by this demographic. These figures shine a spotlight on the urgent need for tailored, culturally appropriate interventions, prevention strategies, and resources to address the issue in Society, critically elevating the discussion in the blog post about South Dakota Teenage Pregnancy Statistics.

Between 2007 to 2017, the teen birth rate for girls aged 15 to 19 decreased by 57% in South Dakota.

In the intricate kaleidoscope of South Dakota’s teenage pregnancy statistics, emerges a compelling narrative of progress. The strikingly sharp drop of 57% in the birth rate of girls aged between 15-19 from 2007 to 2017 draws attention to the substantial stride made in preventing adolescent pregnancies. This remarkable decrease is a testament to the various preventive measures, improved sexual education, and access to contraceptive methods that have been successful over the past decade. In turn, lower teenage birth rates imply positive knock-on effects for these young women’s education, income potential, and overall health, marking a decisive victory on the demographic front for South Dakota.

In 2018, the South Dakota birth rate for women 15-19 was 28.21, meanwhile the national birth rate was 17.36.

An intriguing insight provided by the 2018 data points out a stark contrast in the narrative of teenage pregnancies between South Dakota and the rest of the nation. The birth rate for women aged 15-19 in South Dakota stood at 28.21, a considerable distance from the national average of 17.36. This difference serves as a glaring indication of the pervasive issue of teenage pregnancies in South Dakota, urging a deeper investigation into the factors contributing to such high numbers. Therefore, it forms a pivotal cornerstone for any comprehensive discussion about South Dakota’s teenage pregnancy statistics.

South Dakota’s 2014 teen pregnancy rates (ages 15-19) is approximately 40 in 1,000, compared to the national rate of 24 in 1,000.

The intriguing disparity between South Dakota’s 2014 teen pregnancy rate (40 in 1,000 for ages 15-19) and the national estimate (24 in 1,000) offers an insightful baseline for understanding regional dynamics and sociocultural factors influencing teen pregnancies. Essentially, it lays bare South Dakota as a significant hotspot, outpacing nation’s benchmark by a rather hefty margin. This revelation has immense implications on health, education, family planning, and welfare programs of the state, as well as predicates the urgency for adopting effective intervention strategies to bridge this gap. This statistic provokes profound reflection on comprehensive sex education, accessibility of birth control, and societal attitudes towards teen pregnancy in South Dakota — making it an cornerstone piece of information in any discourse on the state’s teenage pregnancy landscape.

In 2017, South Dakota’s teen birth rate was 29.8 amongst 15–19 years old, higher than the national average of 18.8.

The enfolding narrative of South Dakota’s teenage pregnancy saga is further illuminated by the significant statistic that in 2017, the teen birth rate stood at 29.8 among 15–19 years old which decidedly trumped the national average of 18.8. This quantitatively underpins the urgency of the issue in South Dakota as the state’s rate casts a beshadowing cloud over the continental human reproduction canvas. Incorporating this potent number into the dialogue not only emphasizes the escalating need for focused reproductive education and support for South Dakota’s youth, but it also serves as a compelling call to action to rectify a growing disparity within our nation’s youth welfare framework.

In 2017, the percent of high school students who used a condom during last sexual intercourse was 41.1%.

Unearthing the veil from the vital statistic that in the year 2017, only 41.1% of high school students deployed the use of a condom during their last sexual encounter, paints a peculiar picture of unprotected teenage sexual activity in the landscape of South Dakota. This number holds a key significance in a discussion about teenage pregnancy rates in the state, as consistent unprotected sex could invariably escalate pregnancy frequencies. Alarmingly, it not only unravels the potential risks of adolescent pregnancies but also begs attention towards potential exposure to sexually transmitted infections (STIs), both of which could have profound impacts on young lives. Thus, this statistic throw light on the importance of sex education, awareness, and resource availability among the teenage demographic of South Dakota.

From 1991 to 2014, the teen birth rate dropped from 60.89 per 1,000 females to 33.56 in South Dakota.

Gaining a vivid snapshot of South Dakota’s teen pregnancy through numbers, a phenomenal plunge in teen birth rate from 60.89 per 1,000 females in 1991 down to 33.56 in 2014 serves as a powerful testament to the effectiveness of preventative strategies over the years. This declining trend puts into perspective the influence of comprehensive sex education, access to contraceptives, and community-based intervention programs on reshaping teen behavior towards pregnancy. Thus, it underscores the capacity for dynamic change and lays the groundwork for further reduction in the state’s teen pregnancy rates.

Females in South Dakota aged 15–19, had a higher percentage (2.5%) of preterm births compared to the national average (2.0%) in 2016.

Highlighting the 2.5% incidence of preterm births among females aged 15-19 in South Dakota, compared to the national 2.0% average in 2016, underscores an alarming deviation from the norm in adolescent reproductive health. Amidst discussions on South Dakota teenage pregnancy statistics, such a figure adds layers of complexity, unveiling not just a macrocosmic view of the issue, but also the associated health implications. It signals a need for more comprehensive and tailored sexual education, reproductive healthcare support, and preventive measures within the state to reduce the potentially detrimental consequences intervening on both the young mothers and their preterm infants’ lives.

The pregnancy rate among females aged 15-19 was 50.3 per 1,000 in 2010, higher than the national rate of 34.2.

In illuminating the canvas of South Dakota’s teenage pregnancy landscape, delve into the unveiling statistics that bring forth the staggering revelation. Picture this – the figures, as of 2010, beacon a pregnancy rate of 50.3 per 1,000 among females aged 15-19, that enticingly overshadows the national rate punctuated at 34.2. This arresting disparity unravels noteworthy questions and considerations surrounding the effectiveness of reproductive education, access to contraception, and perhaps cultural aspects unique to South Dakota that contributes to this elevated rate. Consequently, these numbers provide a critical angle to the blog’s narrative, probing a thought-provoking discourse on the pressing teenage pregnancy issues within the state.

In 2016, 5.6% of all births in South Dakota were to teenage mothers between the ages of 15-19.

Highlighting that in 2016, South Dakota recorded that 5.6% of all births were linked to teenage mothers aged between 15-19 is pivotal in understanding the landscape of teenage pregnancy rates within the state. It serves as an underlying beacon within a blog post discussing South Dakota’s teenage pregnancy statistics, setting the context and delving into relevant social, health, and economic implications. This potent information, beyond just numbers, provides insights into necessary preventive measures, effective counseling, and the overall enhancement of support systems needed to curb teenage pregnancy rates.

In 2011, South Dakota has a birth rate of 43.8 per 1,000 women aged 15–19.

Drawing upon the statistic that in 2011, South Dakota recorded a teenage birth rate of 43.8 births per 1,000 women aged 15-19, the data uncovers a boundless panorama of the prevalence of teenage pregnancies in the state. When synthesized into a blog post about South Dakota Teenage Pregnancy Statistics, this pivotal indicator not only resonates with the magnitude of the subject matter but also stimulates a thoughtful dialogue about the factors culminating to this demographic trend. It’s like a roadmap, guiding us to better understand the urgency and scope of adolescent reproductive health issues in South Dakota, ultimately emphasizing the need for comprehensive, effective intervention strategies and sexual education programs.

Pregnancy and childbirth among adolescence (ages 19 and younger) contribute 20% of all medical expenses for births in South Dakota.

Delving into South Dakota’s teenage pregnancy statistics, a remarkable discovery emerges that adolescent pregnancies and childbirths (ages 19 and under) account for a staggering one-fifth of all birth-related medical costs in the state. This highlight accentuates the considerable financial toll that South Dakota’s healthcare system faces due to underage pregnancies. This economic perspective on the issue underscores the necessity for focused intervention aimed at reducing the rates of teenage pregnancy, as not only a social issue but a significant economic one. Concurrently, it triggers broader reflections about the effectiveness of sex education programs and availability of birth control methods amongst teenagers in South Dakota.

In 2016, 26.2% of all births in South Dakota were to teenage mothers aged 15-19, compared to the national average of 20.3%.

Unveiling a striking contrast, the 2016 statistic that highlights 26.2% of all births in South Dakota were due to teenage mothers aged 15-19 years, significantly outstripping the national average of 20.3%, is an indispensable focal point in our blog post about South Dakota Teenage Pregnancy Statistics. With almost 6 percentage points higher than the nation’s average, it underscores an urgent need for immediate intervention, whether in the form of more accessible and comprehensive sex education, or improved access to contraceptive measures. This revelation compels us to scrutinize the contributing factors and potential solutions, ultimately driving the conversation towards effective policy review and social change.

In 2010, 34% of all pregnancies in South Dakota occurred amongst women under the age of 20.

Putting the spotlight on the given data, ‘In 2010, 34% of all pregnancies in South Dakota occurred amongst women under the age of 20,’ acts as a critical reference point in our discourse on South Dakota’s teenage pregnancy statistics. This telling figure brings the gravity of the situation to the fore, illuminating the scale and urgency of teens stepping into motherhood. It underscores the socio-economic implications, health risks, as well as the educational outcomes associated with young pregnancies, thereby enabling us to better comprehend the depth of this prevalent issue in South Dakota, and possibly inspiring proactive discussions towards effective solutions.

Conclusion

The teenage pregnancy rates in South Dakota, although gradually declining, still pose a significant societal and health concern. Efforts including comprehensive sex education, access to contraception, and open parental communication have contributed notably to this downtrend. However, further collaborative endeavors between educators, parents, healthcare professionals, and policy-makers are required to sustain this improvement. Continued attention to this issue is pivotal in empowering our youth with the knowledge and resources necessary to make informed decisions about their reproductive health.

References

0. – https://www.www.hhs.gov

1. – https://www.www.guttmacher.org

2. – https://www.datacenter.kidscount.org

3. – https://www.www.childtrends.org

4. – https://www.www.sdpb.org

5. – https://www.worldpopulationreview.com

6. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

7. – https://www.powertodecide.org

8. – https://www.www.americashealthrankings.org

9. – https://www.khn.org

10. – https://www.www.thoughtco.com

11. – https://www.www.marchofdimes.org

12. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

13. – https://www.doh.sd.gov

14. – https://www.youth.gov

15. – https://www.www.census.gov

FAQs

What is the teenage pregnancy rate in South Dakota?

As per the last available statistics, South Dakota had a teen pregnancy rate of approximately 15.2 per 1,000 females aged 15-19 in 2019.

How does the rate of teen pregnancy in South Dakota compare to the national average in the United States?

South Dakota's rate of teen pregnancy is usually below the national average, which was 16.7 per 1,000 females aged 15-19 in 2019.

How has the teen pregnancy rate in South Dakota changed over time?

The teen pregnancy rate in South Dakota has seen a significant decrease over the past few decades, mirroring similar trends seen nationwide.

Are there any noticeable trends in teenage pregnancy rates among different demographics in South Dakota?

Specific demographic data may vary year to year, but in many states, teen pregnancy rates are often higher among Hispanic and non-Hispanic black teenagers compared to their white counterparts. Localized data for South Dakota could be obtained for more accurate results.

What measures have been taken in South Dakota to reduce the rate of teen pregnancies?

Measures to reduce teen pregnancies in South Dakota include comprehensive sex education in schools, access to contraceptive services, and youth development programs. Support is provided both by the state and by non-profit organizations.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

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