GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Sextortion Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Sextortion Statistics

  • Sextortion related cases have increased by 300% from 2016 to 2020.
  • Over 50% of victims of sextortion are aged between 18 and 24 years old.
  • About 95% of sextortion victims in 2019 were female according to cases reported to the FBI.
  • Approximately 71% of sextortion cases involve offenders who are at least 21 years old.
  • In 2018, 71% of sextortion crimes were committed online.
  • About 12% of teens have been threatened by someone who claimed to have compromising images of them.
  • Over 90% of sextortion scams start on social media, dating apps, and Internet Relay Chat (IRC) according to an Australian study.
  • About 44% of sextortion victims pay a median ransom of $500, according to cybersecurity firm Symantec.
  • In 2017, the stats indicated a frightening average of 5,100 new victims of sextortion per day.
  • Around 60% of these victims are minors, according to the Canadian Centre for Child Protection.
  • Approximately 75% of sextortion victims experienced symptoms of severe depression, according to a study by the Brookings Institution.
  • 20% of sextortion victims are male, based on reports to the Internet Watch Foundation.
  • About 15% of victims do not know the identity of their blackmailer.
  • In 2020, the US Federal Trade Commission received over 1200 reports of non-consensual pornography (sextortion).
  • It was recorded that there was a 150% increase in sextortion attempts in 2018 according to the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3).
  • Sextortion via mobile devices has increased by 120% in the first half of 2019 over the previous year.
  • About 62% of online sex crimes where the Internet was used to meet victims were initiated on social networking sites, making them a common starting point for sextortion.
  • Approximately 3 in 4 sextortion cases involved the offender demanding more explicit content rather than money.
  • Roughly 45% of sextortion occurs between individuals who have had prior offline relationships.

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The rise in internet usage worldwide brings along its myriad issues, one of which is the increasing phenomenon known as sextortion. Through this blog post, we delve into the revealing world of sextortion statistics, reflecting the severity and global magnitude of this malicious practice. Our discussion aims to enhance awareness, focused on the empirical trends, victim demographics, cyber criminal profiles, and the ripple effect of sextortion on society. Breaking down these statistics is not merely to comprehend the numerical count better, but to stimulate discourse and action towards a safer digital environment for all users.

The Latest Sextortion Statistics Unveiled

Sextortion related cases have increased by 300% from 2016 to 2020.

Highlighting a startling upward trend, the 300% surge in sextortion cases from 2016 to 2020 underscores a worrying escalation in digital harassment crimes. This lends pressing relevance to our exploration of sextortion statistics, unmasking the dark side of technological advancement and the urgent need for stronger cybersecurity measures. As we delve into the figures and factual analysis, the magnitude of this threefold increase serves as a stark reminder of the ongoing fight against online exploitation and cyber victimization. It paints a clearer picture of the escalating prevalence, thus, insisting on the need for vigorous actions and policies to counteract sextortion.

Over 50% of victims of sextortion are aged between 18 and 24 years old.

Reflecting upon the statistic specifying that over 50% of victims of sextortion are aged between 18 and 24 years old casts a glaring light on the vulnerability of this demographic. This insight underscores an alarming reality facing our young adults, an age group transitioning from adolescence to adulthood and typically associated with higher education and the early workforce. In the context of a blog post about sextortion, this information offers a deeper understanding of the predominant victim age range, emphasizing the need for targeted prevention strategies, comprehensive sexuality education initiatives, and supportive safeguards among young adults to challenge and curtail this symbiotic relationship between sextortion and age.

About 95% of sextortion victims in 2019 were female according to cases reported to the FBI.

Underscoring the gender disparity revealed by the 2019 data from the FBI, this noteworthy statistic amplifies the alarming frequency of sextortion incidents targeting females. An overwhelming 95% of victims were found to be women, highlighting the urgency for not only dissecting broader societal dialogues around online female safety and exploitation, but also for designing targeted, gender-specific strategies for prevention and support. As such, in the investigative landscape of sextortion statistics, understanding this potent female vulnerability serves as an invaluable compass for researchers, policy-makers, and advocacy groups equally striving to confront and combat this thriving form of digital victimization.

Approximately 71% of sextortion cases involve offenders who are at least 21 years old.

Taking a closer glimpse at this compelling sextortion statistic uncovers a shocking reality. Roughly 71% of reported sextortion cases are linked to perpetrators aged 21 or older, a significant finding that underlines the connection between maturity and this form of cybercrime. This chilling percentage aids in shaping a better understanding of the demographic involved in such exploitative actions, opening up analytical discussions on the societal implications while forming a foundational part of strategizing preventive measures. It also exposes the critical need to spread awareness and educate not only our youth, but adults as well, about the prevalence and grave consequences of sextortion.

In 2018, 71% of sextortion crimes were committed online.

Diving underwater into the realm of sextortion statistics, one is particularly harpooned by the striking figure from 2018, where a staggering 71% of sextortion crimes transpired within the intricate depths of the cyber world. This unsettling data gem fleshes out the ever-evolving dynamics of these predatory practices, insinuating not just the frightening scale, but the nature of the menace lurking in our digital backyards. Leveraging the anonymity and expanseness of the internet, this modus operandi reiterates the pressing need to tighten our virtual fortifications, educate cyber denizens and reign in a potentially spiraling threat in our increasingly interconnected reality.

About 12% of teens have been threatened by someone who claimed to have compromising images of them.

Underscoring the alarming prevalence of sextortion among our young population, the figure declaring that approximately 12% of teens have been on the receiving end of threats from individuals possessing potentially damaging images of them, significantly bolsters the gravity of our online safety discourse. This sobering statistic breathes life into the abstract concept of sextortion, illustrating the stark reality that a sizable portion of teenagers are becoming victims of this exploitative behavior. As the landscape of virtual interactions continues to evolve, this glaring insight underscores the dire necessity for more robust digital protective measures, awareness campaigns, and policy enactment to shield our vulnerable, tech-savvy generation from the menace of sextortion.

Over 90% of sextortion scams start on social media, dating apps, and Internet Relay Chat (IRC) according to an Australian study.

Unveiling the harsh reality of the digital landscape, the statistic from an Australian study–that more than 90% of sextortion scams originate from social media, dating apps, and Internet Relay Chat–acts as a stark warning for those navigating these platforms. Such quantifiable evidence spells out the importance of precautionary steps and digital literacy, serving a pivotal role in a blog post about Sextortion Statistics. This unnerving analysis reinforces the ominous omnipresence of sextortion scams lurking in commonly used platforms, thrusting the urgency to adopt safer surfing habits to fore. Hence the statistic isn’t merely factual data, instead, it sheds light on the magnitude, intensity, and dominant arenas of sextortion scams, offering a tangible dimension to the issue at hand.

About 44% of sextortion victims pay a median ransom of $500, according to cybersecurity firm Symantec.

Unveiling the alarming numbers, the report from cybersecurity giant Symantec starkly shines a light on the shadowy, relentless, and highly profitable underworld of sextortion. With a startling 44% of victims succumbing to pressure and paying up a median ransom of $500, the scale and economic impact of this cybercrime becomes palpably clear. This goes beyond simple numbers as it underlines the harsh reality of online safety, financial hardship for victims, and the urgency for cybercrime prevention and awareness education.

In 2017, the stats indicated a frightening average of 5,100 new victims of sextortion per day.

Diving into the chilling depths of sextortion statistics, one finds an alarming figure from 2017: an average onslaught of 5,100 new victims each day—further illuminating the truly monstrous scale of this cybercrime epidemic. Keeping this figure at the forefront of discussion amplifies the urgency, underscoring the need for more robust preventative measures, improved education about these threats, and heightened awareness. The staggering number speaks volumes about the severity of sextortion, breaching the cyber fortresses of thousands daily while leaving a trail of emotional trauma, humiliation, and distress in its wake—a startling reality that serves as a dark clarion call demanding attention in this digitally-dominated era.

Around 60% of these victims are minors, according to the Canadian Centre for Child Protection.

Unveiling a disturbing facet of the burgeoning issue of sextortion, the Canadian Centre for Child Protection asserts that approximately 60% of victims are minors. This deeply concerning statistic underscores the reality that sextortion predominantly affects the most vulnerable group in our society – children. As we delve into the murky realm of sextortion statistics, this chilling figure serves as a stark reminder of the urgency to implement preventative measures, enforce harsher penalties on perpetrators, and ensure robust online safety education. The exploitation of minors illuminates a societal failure, demanding immediate and comprehensive action to rectify.

Approximately 75% of sextortion victims experienced symptoms of severe depression, according to a study by the Brookings Institution.

Highlighting the severity of impact sextortion has on mental health gives empirical weight and emotional hook to our discussion in this blog post about Sextortion Statistics. The cited statistic from the Brookings Institution study—pointing to a staggering 75% of sextortion victims exhibiting serious depression symptoms—injects a sense of urgency. It impresses upon readers not only the frequency of sextortion but the profound distress it triggers. By bringing visibility to a normally obscured topic, this statistic arms the readership with knowledge, encouraging education, prevention strategies, and emphasizing the critical need for resources and support for victims.

20% of sextortion victims are male, based on reports to the Internet Watch Foundation.

Reflecting on the statistic – ‘20% of sextortion victims are male, as reported to the Internet Watch Foundation’, punctuates an important facet of the wider discussion on sextortion. It underscores a crucial, yet commonly overlooked reality that men, not only women, can fall prey to this cybercrime. Amidst the commonly held perception that women are predominantly the victims of such breaches, this piece of data prompts a paradigm shift, revealing the darker, unacknowledged side of internet safety for males. Incorporating this statistic in a blog post on sextortion could illuminate this pervasive issue and stimulate a more inclusive dialogue on digital security measures for all demographics.

About 15% of victims do not know the identity of their blackmailer.

Delving into the murky waters of Sextortion, a stark revelation confronts us – approximately 15% of victims are left in the dark about their blackmailer’s identity. This chilling figure underscores not only the manipulation and dehumanization ubiquitous in Sextortion, but also compounds its societal impact. These anonymous villains, maliciously looming behind technology’s veil, add a layer of insecurity and complexities to both legal pursuits and supportive interventions. This statistic mutes the voices of 15% victims, whose stories remain untold but nonetheless form an essential piece in the enigma of Sextortion.

In 2020, the US Federal Trade Commission received over 1200 reports of non-consensual pornography (sextortion).

Understanding the striking revelation that, in 2020 alone, the US Federal Trade Commission was bombarded with over 1200 reports of non-consensual pornography or ‘sextortion’, provides crucial insight in a discourse about Sextortion Statistics. This critical piece of data signals an alarming prevalence of the issue, thus underscoring its gravity. It sheds light on the pressing need to address sextortion as a societal concern of considerable magnitude. Furthermore, it helps delineate the scale of a problem that is, by nature, often shrouded in silence and stigma. This hard data assists in framing targeted prevention initiatives, in articulating policy responses and in drawing global attention to the severity and frequency of this form of digital sexual exploitation.

It was recorded that there was a 150% increase in sextortion attempts in 2018 according to the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3).

Highlighting a staggering 150% surge in sextortion attempts, as reported by the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) in 2018, underscores the compelling escalation of this destructive cybercrime. This stark spike delivers a wake-up call to blog readers about the escalating threats in the digital landscape, thereby reinforcing the need for increased vigilance, effective protective measures, and a heightened understanding of sextortion’s breadth and impact. Consequently, educating about the magnitude of the problem becomes an imperative part of our mission in the fight against cybercrimes such as sextortion.

Sextortion via mobile devices has increased by 120% in the first half of 2019 over the previous year.

Delving into the chilling reality of sextortion, the whopping 120% increase in sextortion cases via mobile devices during the first half of 2019, compared to the previous year, uncovers an alarming escalation of this predatory crime. Echoing through the realm of online safety content, this statistic demands our attention, underscoring the increased vulnerability and urgent necessity for enhanced security measures and education to thwart such devastating exploitation that maraud the digital world. This potent figure serves not only as an eyeopener to the rapid growth of sextortion but also powerfully anchors the narrative, providing a clear context for understanding the seriousness and global relevance of this issue in our digitized era.

About 62% of online sex crimes where the Internet was used to meet victims were initiated on social networking sites, making them a common starting point for sextortion.

Undeniably, the statistic which states ‘Around 62% of online sex crimes originate on social networking sites, placing them as a melting pot for sextortion’ paints a striking picture with social media at its epicenter. In the disconcerting realm of sextortion statistics encapsulated in a blog post, this statistic provides a critical nexus connecting online behavior and potential risks. The intriguing 62% illuminates the dark underbelly of social networking sites, serving as a wake-up call for users and industry stakeholders alike about the prevalent threat of sextortion lurking in every corner of these online platforms. This makes the statistic an essential ingredient in stirring awareness, guiding prevention policies, and informing our collective efforts towards safer online experiences.

Approximately 3 in 4 sextortion cases involved the offender demanding more explicit content rather than money.

In the realm of sextortion—an alarming yet often overlooked form of cybercrime, the statement that approximately 3 in 4 cases involve offenders demanding more explicit content as opposed to money, unveils a stark reality that contradicts many assumptions about this type of crime. It underscores the need for heightened awareness that the primary driver of sextortion isn’t always financial, but more disturbingly, the procurement and circulation of intimate material. Incorporating this statistic into a blog post on sextortion statistics can drastically shift readers’ perspective and understanding of both the motivations behind and impact of this cybercrime, ultimately spurring more effective preventative strategies and policies.

Roughly 45% of sextortion occurs between individuals who have had prior offline relationships.

Diving into the murky waters of sextortion, an unexpected and alarming revelation emerges—approximately 45% of such incidences transpire between parties engaged in previous offline relationships. This statistic underscores a fundamental and often overlooked reality: sextortion isn’t strictly confined to the virtual sphere or perpetrated solely by obscure digital predators – it often arises from within our physical social networks. This demystifies the conventional narrative, demonstrating that sextortion is a more nuanced issue than commonly portrayed, often blurring the line between physical and digital safety. This understanding accentuates the need for openness, vigilance and education regarding safe online behaviours within interpersonal relationships.

Conclusion

The surge in sextortion cases over the years posits a serious threat to online safety, highlighting the urgent need for stricter cybersecurity protocols. Individuals, especially young adults and minors, are subjected to threats and manipulation, contributing to emotional distress and cybercrime rates. Therefore, preventive measures such as awareness programs, encryption methods for private data, stronger law enforcement on digital crime, and parental supervision can be instrumental in curbing this menace. The fight against sextortion thus becomes a collective responsibility, requiring concerted efforts from all stakeholders.

References

0. – https://www.www.ncjrs.gov

1. – https://www.www.matec.com

2. – https://www.www.businessinsider.com

3. – https://www.www.symantec.com

4. – https://www.www.revealnews.org

5. – https://www.www.abc.net.au

6. – https://www.www.barracuda.com

7. – https://www.www.brookings.edu

8. – https://www.www.ic3.gov

9. – https://www.www.techrepublic.com

10. – https://www.www.consumer.ftc.gov

11. – https://www.www.arxan.com

12. – https://www.www.wearethorn.org

13. – https://www.www.iwf.org.uk

14. – https://www.www.psychologytoday.com

15. – https://www.www.europol.europa.eu

FAQs

1. What is Sextortion?

1. Sextortion refers to a cybercrime that involves exploitation of individuals, often for sexual purposes, through coercion, manipulation, or threats to release their explicit personal images or information unless demands, often sexual or financial, are met.

2. How prevalent is Sextortion?

2. The actual prevalence of sextortion is difficult to capture due to underreporting. However, the FBI and other organizations have noticed a significant increase in recent years, particularly affecting minors and young adults online.

3. Who are most affected by Sextortion?

3. Sextortion typically targets individuals across all age groups but particularly affects teenagers and young adults who are active on social media or other online platforms. However, no demographic is completely immune.

4. Where does Sextortion most commonly occur?

4. Sextortion primarily occurs online, particularly on social media platforms, chat forums, or via email. It's a global problem impacting victims not only in the US but also worldwide.

5. How can Sextortion be prevented?

5. Sextortion can be mitigated by practicing good digital hygiene such as setting strong, unique passwords, not sharing sensitive personal information or explicit images online, enabling two-step verification, and keeping software and devices updated. Furthermore, awareness and education about sextortion, specifically among young people, can be incredibly valuable.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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