GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Detroit Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Detroit Statistics

  • Detroit is the 24th largest city in the US with a population of about 647,786 in 2021.
  • The median household income in Detroit is $34,009, far below the national average.
  • Almost 33% of Detroit's population lives below the poverty line.
  • Detroit was once the fourth largest city in America, peaking at a population of 1.8 million in 1950.
  • Detroit's racial distribution is 78.6% Black, 12.7% white, 7.6% Hispanic, 0.8% Asian.
  • In January 2020, Detroit's unemployment rate was 9.3%, above the national average.
  • In 2018, Detroit had the highest crime rate in the United States for cities with over 200,000 residents.
  • Detroit has lost nearly half of its population since peaking in 1950. It's estimated to have about 670,000 residents today.
  • Detroit is nicknamed the "Motor City" because it was once the hub of American automobile manufacturing.
  • The Detroit Lions are one of four NFL teams that have never appeared in a Super Bowl.
  • As of December 2021, the Detroit housing market showed a 13.1% increase in the median sale price year over year.
  • Around 36% of households in Detroit are built before 1939.
  • Detroit has around 105.91 square miles of land area.
  • Only 13.6% of Detroit adults aged over 25 have a Bachelor's degree.
  • Over 21% of Detroit's population is under 18.
  • Detroit's health care and social assistance industry employs some 48,678 people.
  • The life expectancy at birth in Detroit (72.2 years) is lower than the U.S. average (78.5 years).
  • The unemployment rate in the Detroit-Warren-Dearborn Metropolitan area as of October 2021 is 4.2%
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Detroit, nicknamed the “Motor City,” is a dynamic and storied metropolis bursting with contrasting figures and intriguing statistics. This blog post aims to examine the statistical framework that shapes Detroit, from its population demographics and economic data to its crime rates and education figures. As we delve into the numbers, we can start to decipher the trends and factors that have been shaping the city’s unique narrative, making Detroit an interesting case study in urban statistical analysis.

The Latest Detroit Statistics Unveiled

Detroit is the 24th largest city in the US with a population of about 647,786 in 2021.

Reflecting on the number 24 spot as per population size among US cities, Detroit houses an approximate 647,786 individuals as of 2021. In the landscape of a blog post dedicated to Detroit statistics, such a fact is noteworthy. It sketches a midsized urban landscape teeming with potential subjects for demographic, economic, and social analysis. Not only does this suggest a vibrant, bustling city, but the patterns and trends that emerge from such an ample population can be used to understand the city in depth, project future growth, plan civic projects, or indeed raise significant issues for consideration. This metric, therefore, serves as an important foundation for more complex statistical appraisal of Detroit’s unique urban fabric.

The median household income in Detroit is $34,009, far below the national average.

Painting a demographic portrait of Detroit using a palette of numbers, the startling disparity between the city’s median household income of $34,009 and the national average vividly stands out. This figure is a stark indicator of the economic struggles faced by many residents, serving as a window into the systemic challenges and inequalities within the city. In an analysis of Detroit statistics, it’s a crucial denominator, helping us understand and frame conversations on issues ranging from educational opportunities, housing affordability, crime rates to access to healthcare. It underscores the urgency and the magnitude of targeted interventions needed in order to bridge the city-wide income gap.

Almost 33% of Detroit’s population lives below the poverty line.

Unmasking the socio-economic landscape of Detroit, an alarming revelation surfaces – nearly a third of its residents live below the poverty line. When evaluating the breadth and depth of Detroit’s statistics, this stark figure not only underscores the considerable economic challenges that a substantial proportion of the city’s inhabitants confront daily, but it also sheds light on the systemic inequality that persists. In the tapestry of numbers that form Detroit’s portrait, this particular statistic stands as a stark reminder of the city’s urgent need for effective socio-economic policies and interventions aimed at alleviating poverty and inspiring hope for a more prosperous future.

Detroit was once the fourth largest city in America, peaking at a population of 1.8 million in 1950.

Illuminating the zenith in Detroit’s vibrant past, we uncover an intriguing statistic that once announced it as the fourth largest city in America. Nestled amidst its illustrious history is 1950, a year when the city resonated with the beating hearts of 1.8 million inhabitants. This heightened population pinnacle sets the stage for subsequent discussions regarding demographic shifts, social trends, economic issues and urban dynamics—each thread woven into the greater tapestry of Detroit’s story. It underlines not just a period of prosperity, but serves as a reference point against which subsequent transformations in the city, some prosperous, others less celebratory, can be measured, appreciated, and critiqued.

Detroit’s racial distribution is 78.6% Black, 12.7% white, 7.6% Hispanic, 0.8% Asian.

Exploring the racial distribution of Detroit paints an illuminating picture of the city’s demographic landscape, intrinsic to any comprehensive understanding of the city’s statistics. The predominance of African-American residents at 78.6%, juxtaposed with the representation of white residents at 12.7%, Hispanic at 7.6% and Asian at a mere 0.8%, reveals a predominantly skewed racial dynamic for the city. This significant racial representation or lack thereof steers the socio-economic, cultural, and political facets of Detroit, and ultimately shapes the narrative around policy making, community development, and social behaviour in the city.

In January 2020, Detroit’s unemployment rate was 9.3%, above the national average.

The pulsating rhythm of Detroit’s economic heartbeat can be measured from its January 2020 unemployment rate of 9.3%, a statistic that extends above the national average. This figure, in itself, paints a stark image of Detroit’s economic canvas, setting it slightly out of sync with the national rhythm. Acutely vital for statistical analysis, it lends an interpretive lens to comprehend the dimensions of Detroit’s labor market struggles or its potential areas of economic revival, hence serving as a compass navigating through potential interpretations and discussions in this blog post about Detroit Statistics.

In 2018, Detroit had the highest crime rate in the United States for cities with over 200,000 residents.

Delving into the labyrinth of Detroit statistics, an alarming pattern emerges, sketching a not-so-rosy picture of safety in the city. It’s noteworthy that in 2018, Detroit held an unwelcome crown: the city with the highest crime rate among U.S. cities accommodating over 200,000 residents. This fact casts its long shadow over Detroit’s image, potentially impacting any discussion around aspects such as the investment climate, living experience, or the effectiveness of law enforcement. This statistic, hence is more than just a number—it is a stark reminder of the imposing challenges that the city faces in its effort to transform and revitalize itself.

Detroit has lost nearly half of its population since peaking in 1950. It’s estimated to have about 670,000 residents today.

Highlighting the stark truth of Detroit’s plummeting population since its heyday in 1950 serves as a compelling backdrop for a discussion on the city’s present-day statistics. With estimates now suggesting a population of just 670,000 – almost half of its previous headcount – the statistic speaks volumes about the socio-economic changes that have swept Detroit over the last seven decades. It underscores the severity of migration trends, providing context for understanding the city’s economic hardships, the shifting dynamics of its housing market, the challenges faced by local policymakers, and the resilience of those who have remained. It’s an illustrative gateway into the narrative of a city that has seen extreme population flux, shaping all other statistics we delve into concerning Detroit.

Detroit is nicknamed the “Motor City” because it was once the hub of American automobile manufacturing.

Embedding the tagline ‘Motor City’ within a blog post about Detroit statistics introduces a rich history underscored by the city’s monumental contribution to America’s automobile industry. The nickname not only highlights the city’s industrial roots, but also bears witness to its dramatic economic shifts, demographic changes, and the role it played in shaping the nation’s transportation and manufacturing landscapes. This statistic essentially paints a broader, more nuanced picture, offering context for statistics related to Detroit’s population dynamics, economic performance, and industrial growth or decline.

The Detroit Lions are one of four NFL teams that have never appeared in a Super Bowl.

In the realm of Detroit statistics, one amazing fact that stands out reveals the historical struggle of its popular football team within the competitive NFL landscape. The city’s pride, the Detroit Lions, surprisingly remain one of only four NFL teams that have never graced the grand stage of the Super Bowl. This remarkable statistic not only weighs on the hearts of die-hard fans but also paints a vivid portrayal of the city’s sports culture, underscoring a narrative of endurance and unfulfilled aspiration that parallels the city’s own tale of resilience amidst economic and social challenges.

As of December 2021, the Detroit housing market showed a 13.1% increase in the median sale price year over year.

Delving into the veritable treasure trove that is Detroit Statistics, one delectable nugget shines particularly bright: the striking crescendo of the median sale price in the housing market, marking a 13.1% hike as of December 2021 compared to the previous year. This potent figure acts as a silent herald, signifying not only a buoyant housing market but also articulating an invigorating narrative of a city on the rise. This promising trend casts a fresh light on the economic stability and growth prospects of Motown, not to mention the sanguine implications for current homeowners, prospective buyers and investors in the housing sector. It also subtly hints at the larger context of urban revitalization, population growth, and increased consumer confidence in Detroit, thus anchoring the blog post with a compelling socio-economic dynamic.

Around 36% of households in Detroit are built before 1939.

Delving into the depths of Detroit’s rich architectural history, the intriguing statistic that approximately 36% of households in the city were constructed prior to 1939 adds an additional layer of complexity to its urban story. This quantifiable data point not only illustrates the longevity and resilience of Detroit’s buildings, but also echoes the historical and cultural changes the city has withstood. For city planners, residents, historians, or anyone interested in the narrative trajectory of Detroit’s evolution, this statistic serves as an important keystone. It offers tangible insights into the societal, economic and design trends that have shaped, and continue to shape, the unique character of Motor City.

Detroit has around 105.91 square miles of land area.

In contextualizing the vast and diverse landscape of Detroit, the figure ‘105.91 square miles of land area’ serves as an atlas, mapping out the physical imprint of this dynamic city. It provides a quantifiable measure of Detroit’s geographic magnitude, paving the way for comparisons with other cities or for more localized studies within its own neighborhoods. As part of a tapestry of data in a blog post about Detroit Statistics, this statistic carves out an essential spatial perspective, helping readers to visualize the literal ground covered by this iconic metropolis.

Only 13.6% of Detroit adults aged over 25 have a Bachelor’s degree.

Highlighting the statistic that only 13.6% of Detroit adults, aged over 25, own a Bachelor’s degree, accentuates a critical social and economic aspect of the city. It not only outlines the education landscape, but further insinuates potential impacts on employment opportunities, income levels, and overall standard of living. This fraction, indeed, less than the national average, tends to sketch a challenge for the city’s future development and progress, proposing a window into areas demanding attention, encouraging policy-makers, researchers, entrepreneurs and educational institutions towards initiatives increasing education access and workforce training.

Over 21% of Detroit’s population is under 18.

Highlighting the fact that over 21% of Detroit’s population is under 18 offers an insightful look into the city’s demographic dynamic. It clearly indicates a significant youth presence in the city’s sociocultural and economic landscape. From education, public policy, to market trends, this youthful skew precipitates ripple effects in diverse areas of the city’s life. Therefore, understanding this statistic equips readers with more substantial comprehension of Detroit’s context and sparks thought regarding its potential future challenges or opportunities.

Detroit’s health care and social assistance industry employs some 48,678 people.

Highlighting the number of individuals employed in Detroit’s health care and social assistance industry provides vital insights on the economic health and community focus of the city. With 48,678 professionals dedicated to this sector, it not only underscores the industry’s critical role in job creation but also the significant investment in health and social welfare in Detroit. Therefore, it paints a broader picture of the city’s commitment to societal betterment and its position as a substantial contributor to its economic infrastructure. This statistic can be a valuable anchor when discussing Detroit’s socio-economic dynamics and priorities.

The life expectancy at birth in Detroit (72.2 years) is lower than the U.S. average (78.5 years).

Distinctly illuminating the health conditions, level of medical services and overall state of well-being in Detroit vis-à-vis the U.S as a whole, the lower average life expectancy at birth in Detroit is a critical statistic to observe. Creating a sharper image of the socio-economic and health disparities between the city and nation, it underscores the potential challenges and opportunities that lie ahead for improving Detroit’s public health policies, medical resources and preventive healthcare measures to ultimately enhance the quality of life and longevity of its residents. This statistic thus forms an essential cornerstone in any insightful analysis of Detroit’s demographics and societal conditions.

The unemployment rate in the Detroit-Warren-Dearborn Metropolitan area as of October 2021 is 4.2%

At the heart of Detroit’s economic dynamism is the pulse of its labor market, acutely represented by the unemployment rate of the Detroit-Warren-Dearborn Metropolitan area, which stood at 4.2% in October 2021. With a keen eye for statistics, one cannot ignore the significance of this figure, symbolizing not just the extent to which locals are participating in the job market but also serving as an indicator of regional economic health and resilience. This number, when compared to historical data or unemployment rates from other regions, can unfold compelling narratives about Detroit’s economic recovery, industrial transformation, or ongoing challenges – vital for any substantive discussion or analysis regarding Detroit’s statistical landscape.

Conclusion

The statistical profile of Detroit provides a rich examination of the city’s past, present, and potential future. Deeper analysis of these statistics reveals the multi-faceted complexities of the city, marked by an enduring spirit amidst economic challenges and significant social disparities. Understanding these numbers not only gives insight into the city’s fight against deep-seated issues but also its unmistakable resilience. A thoughtful approach to these statistics is the key to driving effective interventions and certainly securing a better future for Detroit.

References

0. – https://www.www.census.gov

1. – https://www.www.bls.gov

2. – https://www.www.newsweek.com

3. – https://www.www.freep.com

4. – https://www.www.detroitnews.com

5. – https://www.www.britannica.com

6. – https://www.datausa.io

7. – https://www.www.degc.org

8. – https://www.www.usatoday.com

9. – https://www.www.cbssports.com

10. – https://www.www.redfin.com

11. – https://www.www.city-journal.org

FAQs

What is the population of Detroit, Michigan?

According to 2020 Census data, the population of Detroit is approximately 639,111.

How does the crime rate in Detroit compare to the national average?

Detroit has a higher crime rate than the national average, with a violent crime rate nearly 5 times higher than the U.S average as of 2019 data.

What is the unemployment rate in Detroit?

As of July 2021, the unemployment rate in Detroit was around 8.6%, which is higher than the national average of 5.4%.

How does the average income in Detroit compare to the national average?

The median household income in Detroit, according to 2019 data, was approximately $30,894, which is significantly lower than the national average that year of $62,843.

What is the median age of Detroit residents?

As per the 2019 American Community Survey, the median age of Detroit residents is approximately 34.8 years.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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