GITNUX REPORT 2024

Alarming Bullying On Social Media Statistics: Young People At Risk

Alarming stats reveal epidemic of cyberbullying on social media, impacting teens mental health deeply.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

Statistic 1

59% of U.S. teens have experienced bullying or harassment online.

Statistic 2

37% of teenagers have experienced cyberbullying on social media.

Statistic 3

Over half of adolescents have been bullied online.

Statistic 4

20% of teens report experiencing bullying of some kind.

Statistic 5

80% of young people have engaged in cyberbullying at least once.

Statistic 6

57% of young people believe that social media companies are not doing enough to address online bullying.

Statistic 7

47% of young people believe that social media is the most common source of online bullying.

Statistic 8

61% of parents are concerned about their child being bullied online.

Statistic 9

Only 1 in 10 victims will inform a parent or trusted adult of their abuse.

Statistic 10

83% of U.S. teens believe social media companies have a responsibility to prevent online bullying.

Statistic 11

76% of young people have been sent fake news or false information online.

Statistic 12

79% of young people agree that online bullying is a serious problem.

Statistic 13

Over 80% of young people have reported seeing bullying on social media platforms.

Statistic 14

More than half of LGBTQ youth have experienced cyberbullying on social media platforms.

Statistic 15

Cyberbullying victims are more likely to experience low self-esteem and depression.

Statistic 16

70% of students report seeing frequent cyberbullying online.

Statistic 17

58% of kids admit someone has said mean or hurtful things to them online.

Statistic 18

25% of teenagers report that they have experienced repeated bullying via their cell phone or on the internet.

Statistic 19

90% of teens who have seen social-media bullying say they have ignored it.

Statistic 20

LGBTQ students are 2-3 times more likely to experience cyberbullying.

Statistic 21

62% of young people have witnessed social exclusion or malicious gossip online.

Statistic 22

52% of young people have experienced online pressure to look or act a certain way.

Statistic 23

90% of adolescents who have witnessed cyberbullying say they have ignored it.

Statistic 24

34% of students have experienced cyberbullying before the age of 12.

Statistic 25

33% of young people have been involved in bullying through video games.

Statistic 26

33% of students have been bullied on social media more than once.

Statistic 27

46.6% of students have experienced unwanted contact or malicious messages online.

Statistic 28

39% of young people have seen mean comments or behavior online in the past year.

Statistic 29

24% of teenagers have been the target of explicit images being shared without their consent.

Statistic 30

Girls are more likely than boys to be victims of cyberbullying on social media.

Statistic 31

1 in 3 young people have received threats online.

Statistic 32

21% of students have received mean or threatening messages online.

Statistic 33

Over 37% of young people have been threatened with physical violence on social media.

Statistic 34

87% of young people have seen online abuse with sexist content.

Statistic 35

72% of students have witnessed students being discriminated against online.

Statistic 36

31% of young people have received threatening messages online.

Statistic 37

48% of young people have received unwanted explicit images online.

Statistic 38

41% of young people have experienced trolling online.

Statistic 39

20% of young people have blocked someone on social media due to bullying.

Statistic 40

72% of students report bullying someone else online at least once.

Share:FacebookLinkedIn
Sources

Our Reports have been cited by:

Trust Badges

Summary

  • 59% of U.S. teens have experienced bullying or harassment online.
  • Over 80% of young people have reported seeing bullying on social media platforms.
  • 37% of teenagers have experienced cyberbullying on social media.
  • Girls are more likely than boys to be victims of cyberbullying on social media.
  • More than half of LGBTQ youth have experienced cyberbullying on social media platforms.
  • 57% of young people believe that social media companies are not doing enough to address online bullying.
  • 47% of young people believe that social media is the most common source of online bullying.
  • 20% of young people have blocked someone on social media due to bullying.
  • Cyberbullying victims are more likely to experience low self-esteem and depression.
  • Over half of adolescents have been bullied online.
  • 1 in 3 young people have received threats online.
  • 61% of parents are concerned about their child being bullied online.
  • 70% of students report seeing frequent cyberbullying online.
  • 58% of kids admit someone has said mean or hurtful things to them online.
  • 25% of teenagers report that they have experienced repeated bullying via their cell phone or on the internet.

Buckle up, because the wild world of social media isnt all memes and likes—its also a breeding ground for bullies. With a staggering 59% of U.S. teens getting a taste of online harassment, its clear that the digital playground can quickly turn into a battlefield. From cyberbullying stats that will make your head spin (37% of teens have been targeted) to the alarming trend of LGBTQ youth being prime targets, the numbers dont lie. But hey, at least we can take comfort in the fact that 90% of teens are experts at hitting that ignore button, right? Or maybe its time to address the harsh realities of bullying in the digital age.

Bullying prevalence among US teens

  • 59% of U.S. teens have experienced bullying or harassment online.
  • 37% of teenagers have experienced cyberbullying on social media.
  • Over half of adolescents have been bullied online.
  • 20% of teens report experiencing bullying of some kind.
  • 80% of young people have engaged in cyberbullying at least once.

Interpretation

These statistics paint a troubling picture of the digital playground where our youth spend a significant amount of time. Apparently, social media platforms have become the modern-day battleground where insults and intimidation are the weapons of choice. With almost 80% of young people admitting to wielding the cyber-sword themselves at some point, it seems our virtual walls can sometimes harbor more animosity than camaraderie. In a world where a 'like' or a comment can pack a punch, it's high time we reevaluate the unwritten rules of engagement in this brave new online world.

Concerns and perceptions regarding online safety

  • 57% of young people believe that social media companies are not doing enough to address online bullying.
  • 47% of young people believe that social media is the most common source of online bullying.
  • 61% of parents are concerned about their child being bullied online.
  • Only 1 in 10 victims will inform a parent or trusted adult of their abuse.
  • 83% of U.S. teens believe social media companies have a responsibility to prevent online bullying.
  • 76% of young people have been sent fake news or false information online.
  • 79% of young people agree that online bullying is a serious problem.

Interpretation

In a virtual world where likes and shares carry as much weight as real-life interactions, it seems that the dark side of social media is casting a long shadow over our youth. With a majority of young people feeling let down by social media giants in the battle against online bullying, it's clear that the digital playground is a breeding ground for negativity. Concerned parents are left navigating this treacherous landscape, with the sobering fact that the majority of victims suffer in silence, keeping their pain hidden behind a screen. The prevalence of fake news and misinformation further muddies the waters, raising the question: are we truly connecting, or just drowning in a sea of pixels and pretense? It's time for social media companies to step up to their responsibility and harness the power of their platforms for good, before the dark side of the digital age consumes us all.

Impact of cyberbullying on adolescents

  • Over 80% of young people have reported seeing bullying on social media platforms.
  • More than half of LGBTQ youth have experienced cyberbullying on social media platforms.
  • Cyberbullying victims are more likely to experience low self-esteem and depression.
  • 70% of students report seeing frequent cyberbullying online.
  • 58% of kids admit someone has said mean or hurtful things to them online.
  • 25% of teenagers report that they have experienced repeated bullying via their cell phone or on the internet.
  • 90% of teens who have seen social-media bullying say they have ignored it.
  • LGBTQ students are 2-3 times more likely to experience cyberbullying.
  • 62% of young people have witnessed social exclusion or malicious gossip online.
  • 52% of young people have experienced online pressure to look or act a certain way.
  • 90% of adolescents who have witnessed cyberbullying say they have ignored it.
  • 34% of students have experienced cyberbullying before the age of 12.
  • 33% of young people have been involved in bullying through video games.
  • 33% of students have been bullied on social media more than once.
  • 46.6% of students have experienced unwanted contact or malicious messages online.
  • 39% of young people have seen mean comments or behavior online in the past year.
  • 24% of teenagers have been the target of explicit images being shared without their consent.

Interpretation

In an era where social media dominates our lives, the alarming prevalence of online bullying reveals a dark side to our interconnected world. The statistics speak volumes: from LGBTQ youth facing disproportionate levels of cyberbullying to the pervasive culture of online harassment that impacts the mental health of countless adolescents. As we scroll through our feeds, it's easy to turn a blind eye or brush off hurtful comments as mere words on a screen, but the consequences are real. Ignoring the issue only perpetuates the cycle of cruelty. It's time to log off the bystander role and actively combat cyberbullying, because behind every statistic is a young person who deserves to feel safe and respected in both the physical and digital realms.

Online harassment and threats

  • Girls are more likely than boys to be victims of cyberbullying on social media.
  • 1 in 3 young people have received threats online.
  • 21% of students have received mean or threatening messages online.
  • Over 37% of young people have been threatened with physical violence on social media.
  • 87% of young people have seen online abuse with sexist content.
  • 72% of students have witnessed students being discriminated against online.
  • 31% of young people have received threatening messages online.
  • 48% of young people have received unwanted explicit images online.
  • 41% of young people have experienced trolling online.

Interpretation

In a world where the click of a button holds more power than a playground taunt, the digital realm has become a battleground for young minds. With girls bearing the brunt of cyberbullying and nearly one-third of youth facing online threats, the dark underbelly of social media is unveiled. From explicit images to insidious comments, the statistics paint a bleak picture of the online landscape. As virtual fists fly and keyboards become weapons, it's clear that the virtual playground desperately needs a digital recess monitor. Let’s strive for a social media culture where kindness triumphs over cruelty, and where every click is a step towards a safer online world.

Social media influence on bullying behavior

  • 20% of young people have blocked someone on social media due to bullying.
  • 72% of students report bullying someone else online at least once.

Interpretation

These statistics on bullying on social media paint a stark picture of the digital landscape for our younger generation. With 20% of young people resorting to the digital equivalent of slamming the door in someone's face by blocking them, and a surprisingly high 72% admitting to dishing out their own brand of online bullying, it seems the cyber playground can be just as ruthless as the physical playground. Perhaps it's time we all logged off and took a break to remember that behind every screen is a real person with real feelings - after all, kindness never goes out of style, in any realm, virtual or otherwise.

References