GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

The Most Surprising Australian Food Waste Statistics And Trends in 2024

Table of Contents

Food waste is a major issue in Australia, with Australians throwing away around 7.3 million tonnes of food annually and the cost to the economy estimated at AUD 20 billion per year. Households are responsible for roughly 34% of this total, while school lunches contribute an additional 25%. In fact, 35% of what goes into Australian household bins consists of food waste – that’s $8 billion worth every year.

It doesn’t stop there; approximately 20% of all purchased food ends up in landfills and over 9 million tonnes CO2 is produced by decomposing food waste each year. Fruit and vegetables make up 43%, but it’s not just households contributing to these figures: 2.2 million tonnes comes from commercial/industrial sectors too. Even Victoria alone produces 250,000 tonnes yearly which contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions.

The average Australian household throws out $1,036 worth edible foods annually – yet only 3% believe their own homes generate no such wastage. Agriculture accounts for 19%, resulting in 1.1 million wasted produce items across the country each year as well as 100+million meals redistributed by rescue organizations nationwide.. All told, 2018 saw 1.6 %of Australia’s total GHG emissions attributed directly to our nation’s growing problem with Food Waste

The Most Important Statistics
Australians throw away around 7.3 million tonnes of food annually.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the sheer amount of food that is being wasted in Australia each year. It highlights the magnitude of the problem and serves as a call to action for individuals, businesses, and governments to take steps to reduce food waste.

Households in Australia are responsible for roughly 34% of the country’s total food waste.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the amount of food waste generated by households in Australia. It highlights the need for households to be more mindful of their food consumption and to take steps to reduce the amount of food waste they produce. It also serves as a call to action for the government and other stakeholders to take measures to reduce food waste in Australia.

Australian Food Waste Statistics Overview

About 25% of school lunches end up in the trash, contributing to food waste in Australia.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the amount of food waste that is occurring in Australia. It highlights the fact that a quarter of school lunches are being thrown away, which is a huge amount of food that could have been put to better use. This statistic is a call to action to reduce food waste in Australia, and to ensure that all food is being used to its fullest potential.

35% of the average Australian’s household bin consists of food waste.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the amount of food that is being wasted in Australian households. It highlights the need for Australians to be more mindful of their food consumption and to take steps to reduce the amount of food that is being thrown away. It also serves as a call to action for individuals, businesses, and governments to work together to reduce food waste and its associated environmental impacts.

Australians discard $8 billion worth of edible food every year.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the immense amount of edible food that is being wasted in Australia each year. It highlights the need for greater awareness and action to reduce food waste in the country, and serves as a call to action for individuals, businesses, and governments to take steps to reduce the amount of food that is being thrown away.

20% of the food purchased in Australia ends up in the landfill.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the amount of food that is being wasted in Australia. It highlights the need for more sustainable practices when it comes to food production and consumption. It also serves as a call to action for individuals, businesses, and governments to take steps to reduce the amount of food that is being thrown away.

In Victoria, over 250,000 tonnes of food is thrown away by households each year, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the environmental impact of food waste in Victoria. Not only does it represent a huge amount of food that could have been used to feed people, but it also contributes to greenhouse gas emissions, further exacerbating the effects of climate change.

Australian households throw away $1,036 worth of food per year on average.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the amount of food that is being wasted in Australia each year. It highlights the need for households to be more mindful of their food consumption and to take steps to reduce the amount of food they are throwing away. It also serves as a reminder of the financial cost of food waste, which can be a significant burden on households.

Over 9 million tonnes of CO2 is produced by Australian food waste annually as it decomposes in landfill.

The staggering statistic of 9 million tonnes of CO2 produced by Australian food waste annually is a stark reminder of the environmental impact of our food waste. This amount of CO2 is equivalent to the emissions of over 1.8 million cars, and is a major contributor to global warming. It is a sobering reminder of the need to reduce food waste and take action to protect our planet.

Fruit and vegetables make up around 43% of food waste in Australian homes.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the amount of produce that is being wasted in Australian homes. It highlights the need for households to be more mindful of their food consumption and to take steps to reduce the amount of fruit and vegetables that are thrown away. It also serves as a reminder of the importance of reducing food waste in order to help protect the environment and conserve resources.

Around 2.2 million tonnes of food waste is generated by the Australian commercial and industrial sectors each year.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the sheer amount of food waste generated by the Australian commercial and industrial sectors each year. It highlights the need for more effective strategies to reduce food waste and ensure that food is not wasted unnecessarily. It also serves as a call to action for businesses to take responsibility for their food waste and to take steps to reduce it.

In 2018, food waste accounted for 1.6% of Australia’s total greenhouse gas emissions.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the impact that food waste has on Australia’s total greenhouse gas emissions. It highlights the need for Australians to take action to reduce the amount of food waste they produce, in order to help reduce the country’s overall emissions.

2.5 million tonnes of food waste was recovered from the Australian food supply chain in the 2016-2017 financial year.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the sheer amount of food waste that is generated in the Australian food supply chain. It highlights the need for more effective strategies to reduce food waste and ensure that the food that is produced is used to its fullest potential. It also serves as a call to action for individuals, businesses, and governments to take steps to reduce food waste and ensure that the food that is produced is used in a responsible and sustainable manner.

Food rescue organizations in Australia redistribute over 100 million meals worth of food to Australians in need.

This statistic is a powerful reminder of the impact that food rescue organizations have on the lives of Australians in need. It highlights the incredible amount of food that is being redistributed to those who need it most, and the positive effect it has on the lives of those who receive it. It also serves as a stark reminder of the amount of food that is being wasted in Australia, and the need for more effective strategies to reduce food waste.

Approximately 75% of the food supply chain’s waste is generated by food processing and manufacturing.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the amount of food waste generated by the food supply chain. It highlights the need for more efficient processes and better management of resources in the food processing and manufacturing industry. It also serves as a call to action for businesses and consumers alike to reduce their food waste and ensure that the food they produce and consume is used to its fullest potential.

The average household food waste in New South Wales weighs 1.55 kg per week.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the amount of food that is being wasted in New South Wales each week. It highlights the need for more awareness and action to reduce the amount of food that is being thrown away in the state. It also serves as a call to action for individuals and businesses to take steps to reduce their food waste and help create a more sustainable future.

Only 3% of Australians believe their household generates no food waste.

This statistic serves as a stark reminder that the majority of Australians are not taking the necessary steps to reduce their food waste. It highlights the need for more education and awareness around the issue of food waste in Australia, and the importance of taking action to reduce it.

Conclusion

The statistics presented in this blog post demonstrate the significant amount of food waste generated by Australians each year. Households are responsible for 34% of total food waste, with an average household throwing away $1,036 worth of edible food annually. Schools also contribute to Australia’s high levels of food wastage – 25% of school lunches end up in the trash every day. The primary production and processing sectors account for 47%, while agricultural produce accounts for 19%.

Food rescue organizations have been successful at redistributing over 100 million meals worth of surplus or wasted foods to those who need it most; however, more needs to be done if we want to reduce our environmental impact from greenhouse gas emissions caused by decomposing organic matter in landfills. Reducing our individual consumption is a great place to start – only 3% believe their households generate no food waste.

References

0. – https://www.environmentreport.com.au

1. – https://www.sustainabilitymatters.net.au

2. – https://www.ourworld.unu.edu

3. – https://www.planetark.org

4. – https://www.coolaustralia.org

5. – https://www.sustainability.vic.gov.au

6. – https://www.foodwise.com.au

7. – https://www.nationalgeographic.com

8. – https://www.foodbank.org.au

9. – https://www.blog.ipleaders.in

10. – https://www.rabodirect.com.au

11. – https://www.wwf.org.au

FAQs

What percentage of food waste in Australia is generated by households?

34% of the total food waste in Australia is generated by households.

How much food waste is produced per person in Australia annually?

On average, an individual in Australia wastes approximately 298 kg of food per year.

What is the estimated value of the food wasted in Australia?

The estimated value of the food wasted in Australia is around AUD$20 billion annually.

What are the most common types of food wasted in Australia?

The most common types of food wasted in Australia are fresh fruits and vegetables, leftovers, and packaged food items.

What initiatives has the Australian government taken to reduce food waste?

The Australian government established the National Food Waste Strategy in 2017, aiming to halve the country's food waste by 2030 through waste prevention, innovation, behavior change, and the promotion of a circular economy.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents