GITNUX REPORT 2024

Workers Compensation Statistics: 2019 Payouts Reach $65.1 Billion, Trends Revealed

Delve into the costly impact and prevalent risks of workplace injuries in the compensation realm.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

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The rate of fatal occupational injuries in the construction industry was 9.5 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers in 2018.

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In 2018, the most common fatal occupational injury event in the construction industry was falls to a lower level.

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The rate of fatal occupational injuries for Hispanic or Latino workers was higher than the overall rate in 2018, at 3.7 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers.

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The construction and extraction occupations had the highest number of fatal occupational injuries in 2018.

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In 2018, transportation incidents were the leading cause of fatal occupational injuries, accounting for 40% of all cases.

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The rate of fatal occupational injuries for older workers (65 and over) was higher than the overall rate in 2018.

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The rate of fatal occupational injuries in the private construction industry increased by 3% in 2018.

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In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for self-employed workers was higher than the overall rate.

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The construction industry accounted for the highest number of fatal occupational injuries in 2018, with 1,008 fatalities.

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The rate of fatal occupational injuries in the private mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction industry was 12.1 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers in 2018.

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In 2018, contact with objects and equipment was the second leading fatal occupational injury event, accounting for 15% of all cases.

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Transportation incidents were the leading fatal occupational injury event in the transportation and warehousing industry in 2018.

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In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for African American workers was higher than the overall rate.

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The rate of fatal occupational injuries in the private agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting industry was 23.0 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers in 2018.

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In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander workers was lower than the overall rate.

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In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for white, non-Hispanic workers was lower than the overall rate.

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The manufacturing industry had the second-highest number of fatal occupational injuries in 2018, with 449 fatalities.

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In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for women was lower than the overall rate.

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In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for men was higher than the overall rate.

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In 2019, the manufacturing industry had the highest number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses among private industry sectors.

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Overexertion and bodily reaction were the leading causes of nonfatal occupational injuries in the healthcare and social assistance industry in 2019.

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Slips, trips, and falls were the leading causes of nonfatal occupational injuries in the accommodation and food services industry in 2019.

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In 2019, the rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses among private industry workers was 2.8 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers.

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The construction industry had the highest rate of workplace injuries and illnesses in 2019, at 4.8 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers.

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The rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the healthcare and social assistance industry was 4.3 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers in 2019.

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The rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the retail trade industry was 2.7 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers in 2019.

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In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for Asian workers was lower than the overall rate.

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The rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the professional and business services industry was 1.7 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers in 2019.

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The rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the education and health services industry was 2.9 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers in 2019.

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The rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the manufacturing industry was 3.4 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers in 2019.

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Workers’ compensation benefits paid to injured and ill workers in 2019 totaled $65.1 billion.

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The average cost of a workers’ compensation claim in 2018 was $41,003.

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The median number of days away from work due to a musculoskeletal disorder in 2018 was 11 days.

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In 2019, the median number of days away from work due to a nonfatal workplace illness was 10 days.

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Musculoskeletal disorders accounted for 30% of all workplace injuries and illnesses in 2018.

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The most common types of workplace injuries in 2018 were sprains, strains, and tears, accounting for 30% of all cases.

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Overexertion and bodily reaction were the leading causes of workplace injuries in 2018, accounting for 33% of all cases.

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Falls, slips, and trips were the second leading cause of workplace injuries in 2018, accounting for 27% of cases.

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In 2019, the median number of days away from work due to a nonfatal workplace injury was 8 days.

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In 2018, there were 922,840 nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in private industry.

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Summary

  • Workers’ compensation benefits paid to injured and ill workers in 2019 totaled $65.1 billion.
  • The average cost of a workers’ compensation claim in 2018 was $41,003.
  • Musculoskeletal disorders accounted for 30% of all workplace injuries and illnesses in 2018.
  • In 2019, the rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses among private industry workers was 2.8 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers.
  • The construction industry had the highest rate of workplace injuries and illnesses in 2019, at 4.8 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers.
  • The most common types of workplace injuries in 2018 were sprains, strains, and tears, accounting for 30% of all cases.
  • The median number of days away from work due to a musculoskeletal disorder in 2018 was 11 days.
  • Overexertion and bodily reaction were the leading causes of workplace injuries in 2018, accounting for 33% of all cases.
  • In 2019, the manufacturing industry had the highest number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses among private industry sectors.
  • Falls, slips, and trips were the second leading cause of workplace injuries in 2018, accounting for 27% of cases.
  • The rate of fatal occupational injuries in the construction industry was 9.5 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers in 2018.
  • In 2018, the most common fatal occupational injury event in the construction industry was falls to a lower level.
  • The rate of fatal occupational injuries for Hispanic or Latino workers was higher than the overall rate in 2018, at 3.7 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers.
  • The construction and extraction occupations had the highest number of fatal occupational injuries in 2018.
  • In 2018, transportation incidents were the leading cause of fatal occupational injuries, accounting for 40% of all cases.

With a staggering $65.1 billion paid out in workers compensation benefits in 2019, its clear that workplace injuries are no small matter - except maybe in the eyes of sprains, strains, and tears, which accounted for a whopping 30% of all cases in 2018! From musculoskeletal disorders to falls, slips, and trips, the world of workers comp is a wild ride of statistics and safety mishaps. So, grab your hard hat and read on to uncover the high-risk industry secrets and median days away from work - because when it comes to on-the-job injuries, knowledge is power, and a hefty price tag!

Fatal occupational injuries

  • The rate of fatal occupational injuries in the construction industry was 9.5 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers in 2018.
  • In 2018, the most common fatal occupational injury event in the construction industry was falls to a lower level.
  • The rate of fatal occupational injuries for Hispanic or Latino workers was higher than the overall rate in 2018, at 3.7 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers.
  • The construction and extraction occupations had the highest number of fatal occupational injuries in 2018.
  • In 2018, transportation incidents were the leading cause of fatal occupational injuries, accounting for 40% of all cases.
  • The rate of fatal occupational injuries for older workers (65 and over) was higher than the overall rate in 2018.
  • The rate of fatal occupational injuries in the private construction industry increased by 3% in 2018.
  • In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for self-employed workers was higher than the overall rate.
  • The construction industry accounted for the highest number of fatal occupational injuries in 2018, with 1,008 fatalities.
  • The rate of fatal occupational injuries in the private mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction industry was 12.1 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers in 2018.
  • In 2018, contact with objects and equipment was the second leading fatal occupational injury event, accounting for 15% of all cases.
  • Transportation incidents were the leading fatal occupational injury event in the transportation and warehousing industry in 2018.
  • In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for African American workers was higher than the overall rate.
  • The rate of fatal occupational injuries in the private agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting industry was 23.0 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers in 2018.
  • In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander workers was lower than the overall rate.
  • In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for white, non-Hispanic workers was lower than the overall rate.
  • The manufacturing industry had the second-highest number of fatal occupational injuries in 2018, with 449 fatalities.
  • In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for women was lower than the overall rate.
  • In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for men was higher than the overall rate.

Interpretation

In a somber symphony of statistics, the construction industry emerges as a deadly arena where falls to lower levels steal lives like a merciless thief in the night. Hispanic or Latino workers face a disproportionately higher risk of fatal injuries, dancing dangerously close to the edge of mortality at a rate surpassing the norm. As the construction and extraction occupations bear witness to the highest number of fatal occupational injuries, the clatter of transportation incidents echoes loudly as the leading cause of devastation, claiming a staggering 40% of lives lost. In this grim tapestry of tragedy, the aging workforce and self-employed warriors find themselves facing a heightened danger, while the private construction industry experiences a chilling 3% rise in the rate of fatal injuries. Amidst this macabre landscape, the casualties mount, bespeaking the urgent need for improved safety measures and a staunch commitment to protect those who build our world, reminding us that behind every statistic lies a life cut short and a family forever changed.

Industry-specific injury data

  • In 2019, the manufacturing industry had the highest number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses among private industry sectors.
  • Overexertion and bodily reaction were the leading causes of nonfatal occupational injuries in the healthcare and social assistance industry in 2019.
  • Slips, trips, and falls were the leading causes of nonfatal occupational injuries in the accommodation and food services industry in 2019.

Interpretation

In a world where the daily grind can sometimes feel like a juggling act between overexertion-induced backaches and slippery banana-peel-like workplace hazards, the latest 2019 Workers Compensation statistics serve as a stark reminder that safety and health go hand-in-hand in the professional arena. While the manufacturing industry dances with nonfatal injuries and illnesses as its unwanted partner-in-crime, the healthcare and social assistance industry finds itself engaged in a tango with overexertion, while the accommodation and food services industry seemingly struggles to keep its footing on the treacherous dance floor of slips, trips, and falls. Let's hope that in 2020, these industries can take a cue from Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers and gracefully glide towards a safer work environment for all.

Occupational injury rates

  • In 2019, the rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses among private industry workers was 2.8 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers.
  • The construction industry had the highest rate of workplace injuries and illnesses in 2019, at 4.8 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers.
  • The rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the healthcare and social assistance industry was 4.3 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers in 2019.
  • The rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the retail trade industry was 2.7 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers in 2019.
  • In 2018, the rate of fatal occupational injuries for Asian workers was lower than the overall rate.
  • The rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the professional and business services industry was 1.7 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers in 2019.
  • The rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the education and health services industry was 2.9 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers in 2019.
  • The rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the manufacturing industry was 3.4 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers in 2019.

Interpretation

In a world where job hazards seem to lurk around every corner, the numbers don’t lie. From the daredevils of construction to the unsung heroes of healthcare, the battleground of workplace safety knows no bounds. With a rate of occupational injuries and illnesses higher than a pack of legal briefs, the construction industry stands tall at 4.8 cases per 100 employees – a reminder that their work involves more than just building castles in the sky. As for the retail trade industry, well, it might seem like smooth sailing at 2.7 cases, but every customer tantrum carries its own occupational hazard. And let’s not forget about the health and education warriors clocking in at 4.3 and 2.9 cases per 100 workers, respectively – a reminder that even the noblest professions are not immune to workplace woes. So, whether you’re toiling away in a cubicle or atop a scaffold, remember: safety first, because statistics never lie – and neither do broken bones.

Workers' compensation benefits

  • Workers’ compensation benefits paid to injured and ill workers in 2019 totaled $65.1 billion.
  • The average cost of a workers’ compensation claim in 2018 was $41,003.
  • The median number of days away from work due to a musculoskeletal disorder in 2018 was 11 days.
  • In 2019, the median number of days away from work due to a nonfatal workplace illness was 10 days.

Interpretation

The mind-boggling numbers in the realm of workers' compensation speak volumes about the toll exacted by workplace injuries and illnesses. With benefits totaling a whopping $65.1 billion in 2019 alone, it seems that the cost of keeping employees safe is steep indeed – at an average of $41,003 per claim, to be precise. The seemingly harmless musculoskeletal disorder can disrupt work for an average of 11 days, while nonfatal workplace illnesses force employees to stay home for a slightly shorter 10 days in 2019. These figures are a resounding wake-up call for employers to invest in workplace safety and employee well-being, as the price of neglect is not only financial but human.

Workplace injuries

  • Musculoskeletal disorders accounted for 30% of all workplace injuries and illnesses in 2018.
  • The most common types of workplace injuries in 2018 were sprains, strains, and tears, accounting for 30% of all cases.
  • Overexertion and bodily reaction were the leading causes of workplace injuries in 2018, accounting for 33% of all cases.
  • Falls, slips, and trips were the second leading cause of workplace injuries in 2018, accounting for 27% of cases.
  • In 2019, the median number of days away from work due to a nonfatal workplace injury was 8 days.
  • In 2018, there were 922,840 nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in private industry.

Interpretation

In a world where our bodies are both our best tools and our most vulnerable assets, the dance between work and wellness becomes increasingly delicate. From the pirouettes of overexertion to the slippery slips and falls that leave us stumbling, the stage of the workplace proves to be fraught with hazards. With musculoskeletal disorders taking center stage in the injury saga, it's crucial for employers to choreograph safe practices and ergonomic routines to keep their performers – the workers – in top form. As we take a bow in 2019 with an average of 8 days away from work due to nonfatal injuries, it's a reminder that the show must go on, but not at the cost of worker well-being.

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