GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Water Pollution In India Statistics [Fresh Research]

Highlights: The Most Important Water Pollution In India Statistics

  • About 70% of India’s surface water resources are polluted due to the discharge of untreated wastewater.
  • Around 22% of diseases in India are due to the consumption of contaminated water.
  • 40 million people in India suffer from waterborne diseases annually.
  • The Ganges river in India is ranked as the 2nd most polluted river in the world affecting 2.9 million people.
  • Out of 36 states and union territories in India, only 8 of them have rivers that meet the prescribed water quality criteria.
  • In 2019, 25,000 million liters of untreated sewage was disposed of into rivers, resulting in severe water pollution.
  • It is estimated that 90 million people in India do not have access to safe drinking water.
  • Unsafe water currently causes more deaths in India than terrorism, with approximately 1,600 deaths per day.
  • By 2030, the demand for freshwater in India is expected to double, potentially exacerbating the issue of water pollution.
  • About 14 Indian cities ranked among the world’s most polluted cities in terms of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PM2.5 levels.
  • 38.2% of the total freshwater resources in India are polluted due to various reasons, including industrial waste, urban and agricultural runoff.
  • 37% of deaths caused by waterborne diseases in India are among children under the age of five.
  • The Yamuna river, the most polluted river in India, contains harmful levels of coliform bacteria around 100 million times the safe limit.
  • Groundwater in 19 out of 29 states in India shows alarming levels of nitrate pollution, leading to serious health issues.

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Water pollution in India is a major environmental and public health concern. According to the World Health Organization, about 70% of India’s surface water resources are polluted due to untreated wastewater discharge. This has resulted in around 22% of diseases being caused by contaminated water consumption. It is estimated that 40 million people suffer from waterborne diseases annually, with nearly 45.3% of sampled wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) not compliant with pollution standards. Out of 36 states and union territories in India, only 8 have rivers meeting prescribed quality criteria while 25000 million liters of sewage was disposed into rivers last year alone resulting in severe contamination levels across the country’s waterways. 90 million Indians lack access to safe drinking water while 80% industrial pollution can be attributed to just a few heavily polluting industries such as textiles, pharmaceuticals and leather production facilities; 276 major Indian rivers are also affected by high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), making their waters unsafe for bathing or drinking purposes – The Ganges river ranking 2nd most polluted globally affecting 2.9 million people directly – Unsafe Water causing more deaths than terrorism at 1600 per day – By 2030 freshwater demands expected double potentially exacerbating issue further- 14 cities ranked among world’s most polluted cities VOC & PM2 5 levels– 38885 MLD sewage generated daily but current capacity only 14789MLD– Chemical pollutants exceed acceptable 32 times certain locations- 37 % death children under five due WBD & Yamuna 100Million Times Safe Limit Coliform Bacteria – Groundwater 19/29 States Alarming Nitrate Pollution Levels leading serious health issues & 70 % available contaminated leading cause human environment health issues . These statistics paint an alarming picture regarding the state of water pollution in India today which needs urgent attention if we want our future generations to enjoy clean air and healthy lives.

The Most Important Statistics
About 70% of India’s surface water resources are polluted due to the discharge of untreated wastewater. This statistic is a stark reminder of the severity of water pollution in India. It highlights the fact that the majority of India’s surface water resources are contaminated, making them unsafe for human consumption and other uses. This statistic is a call to action for the government and citizens of India to take steps to reduce water pollution and protect the country’s water resources. Around 22% of diseases in India are due to the consumption of contaminated water. This statistic is a stark reminder of the devastating effects of water pollution in India. It highlights the fact that a significant portion of diseases in India are caused by the consumption of contaminated water, which is a direct result of water pollution. This statistic serves as a call to action to address the issue of water pollution in India and to ensure that the population has access to clean and safe drinking water.

Water Pollution In India Statistics Overview

40 million people in India suffer from waterborne diseases annually.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the devastating effects of water pollution in India. It highlights the urgent need for action to be taken to reduce the amount of waterborne diseases in the country, as 40 million people are suffering annually due to contaminated water. It is a call to action for everyone to work together to protect India’s water resources and ensure that everyone has access to clean and safe drinking water.

The Ganges river in India is ranked as the 2nd most polluted river in the world affecting 2.9 million people.

This statistic serves as a stark reminder of the devastating effects of water pollution in India, highlighting the severity of the issue and the number of people affected. It is a powerful illustration of the urgent need to address water pollution in India and the importance of taking action to protect the environment.

Out of 36 states and union territories in India, only 8 of them have rivers that meet the prescribed water quality criteria.

This statistic serves as a stark reminder of the severity of water pollution in India. With only 8 out of 36 states and union territories meeting the prescribed water quality criteria, it is clear that the majority of India’s rivers are in a state of contamination. This is a cause for alarm and should be addressed with urgency.

In 2019, 25,000 million liters of untreated sewage was disposed of into rivers, resulting in severe water pollution.

This statistic serves as a stark reminder of the devastating effects of water pollution in India. It highlights the magnitude of the problem, with 25,000 million liters of untreated sewage being disposed of into rivers, leading to severe water contamination. This statistic is a call to action, urging us to take steps to protect our water resources and prevent further pollution.

It is estimated that 90 million people in India do not have access to safe drinking water.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the dire consequences of water pollution in India. It highlights the fact that millions of people are being denied access to a basic human right – safe drinking water – due to the rampant water pollution in the country. This statistic serves as a call to action to take immediate steps to address the issue of water pollution in India.

Approximately 80% of India’s industrial water pollution is attributable to just a few heavily polluting industries, including textiles, pharmaceuticals, and leather.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the disproportionate impact that a few industries have on India’s water pollution. It highlights the need for greater regulation and enforcement of environmental standards in these industries, as well as the need for more sustainable practices to be adopted. It also serves as a warning to other industries that may be tempted to take a lax approach to environmental protection.

Approximately 276 major rivers in India are polluted due to high levels of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), making their water unsafe for drinking and bathing.

This statistic serves as a stark reminder of the severity of water pollution in India. It highlights the fact that a large number of rivers in the country are contaminated with high levels of BOD, rendering them unfit for human consumption and use. This statistic is a call to action, urging people to take steps to reduce water pollution and protect India’s rivers.

Unsafe water currently causes more deaths in India than terrorism, with approximately 1,600 deaths per day.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the devastating effects of water pollution in India, highlighting the urgent need for action to be taken. It serves as a powerful illustration of the magnitude of the problem, with 1,600 lives lost every day due to unsafe water. This statistic is a call to action, emphasizing the importance of addressing water pollution in India.

By 2030, the demand for freshwater in India is expected to double, potentially exacerbating the issue of water pollution.

This statistic serves as a stark reminder of the urgency of the water pollution crisis in India. It highlights the fact that, if left unchecked, the demand for freshwater in India will soon outstrip the available supply, leading to an even more dire situation. This statistic is a call to action, urging us to take steps now to protect India’s water resources and prevent further water pollution.

About 14 Indian cities ranked among the world’s most polluted cities in terms of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PM2.5 levels.

This statistic serves as a stark reminder of the severity of water pollution in India. It highlights the fact that the air quality in many Indian cities is so poor that they rank among the most polluted cities in the world. This is a worrying sign that the water pollution in India is reaching alarming levels and needs to be addressed urgently.

38.2% of the total freshwater resources in India are polluted due to various reasons, including industrial waste, urban and agricultural runoff.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the severity of water pollution in India. It highlights the fact that a large portion of the country’s freshwater resources are contaminated, making them unfit for human consumption and other uses. This statistic is a call to action, urging citizens and the government to take steps to reduce water pollution and protect India’s precious freshwater resources.

Around 38,885 million liters of sewage is generated daily in urban areas in India, however, the current sewage treatment capacity is only 14,789 million liters.

This statistic serves as a stark reminder of the immense gap between the amount of sewage generated daily in urban areas in India and the current sewage treatment capacity. It highlights the urgent need to bridge this gap in order to reduce water pollution in India.

37% of deaths caused by waterborne diseases in India are among children under the age of five.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the devastating effects of water pollution in India, particularly on the most vulnerable members of society. It highlights the urgent need for action to be taken to reduce waterborne diseases and protect the health of children in India. It is a call to action for all those concerned about the health and wellbeing of India’s children to take steps to reduce water pollution and improve access to clean water.

The Yamuna river, the most polluted river in India, contains harmful levels of coliform bacteria around 100 million times the safe limit.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the severity of water pollution in India. It paints a vivid picture of the immense contamination of the Yamuna river, and serves as a warning of the potential consequences of neglecting water pollution. It is a powerful illustration of the urgent need to take action to protect India’s water sources.

Groundwater in 19 out of 29 states in India shows alarming levels of nitrate pollution, leading to serious health issues.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the severity of water pollution in India. It highlights the fact that nitrate pollution is a major issue in 19 out of 29 states, and that it is leading to serious health issues. This is a cause for concern, as it shows that water pollution is a widespread problem that needs to be addressed urgently.

Conclusion

The statistics presented in this blog post demonstrate the severity of water pollution in India. From rivers that are ranked as some of the most polluted in the world to groundwater contamination, it is clear that there is an urgent need for action to address this issue. The data also shows how widespread and pervasive water pollution has become, with nearly 90 million people lacking access to safe drinking water and 1,600 deaths per day due to unsafe consumption. Furthermore, only 8 out of 36 states have rivers meeting prescribed quality criteria while 25 thousand million liters of untreated sewage was disposed into rivers last year alone. It is evident from these figures that immediate steps must be taken by both government authorities and citizens alike if we want a future where clean water can be accessed by all Indians without fear or risk of harm.

References

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FAQs

What are the main sources of water pollution in India?

The main sources of water pollution in India include industrial waste, agricultural runoff, untreated sewage, and dumping of solid waste into water bodies.

What is the impact of water pollution on human health in India?

Water pollution in India has led to an increased prevalence of waterborne diseases such as cholera, typhoid, and hepatitis, as well as diarrhea, dysentery, and skin infections. Contaminated water also contributes to malnutrition and impairs the cognitive development of children.

Which Indian rivers are most affected by water pollution?

The Ganga, Yamuna, and Sabarmati are among the most polluted rivers in India, primarily due to industrial and domestic sewage discharge and agricultural runoff.

What measures are being taken by the Indian government to address water pollution?

The Indian government has implemented initiatives such as the National River Conservation Plan (NRCP), the National Water Policy, and the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) to monitor and improve water quality. The government has also launched specific programs like Namami Gange to clean the Ganga river and its tributaries.

How can an individual help in reducing water pollution in India?

Individuals can contribute to reducing water pollution by practicing water conservation methods, properly disposing of waste, using eco-friendly household products, supporting community initiatives for cleaner water, and raising awareness about the importance of clean water and sanitation.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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