GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Truck Driver Shortage Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Truck Driver Shortage Statistics

  • In 2017, the transportation sector was short approximately 60,800 drivers.
  • By 2028, the trucking industry is predicted to fall short by 160,000 drivers if current trends hold.
  • In 2018, trucking moves 71.4% of the nation’s freight, needing more drivers.
  • The median age for a truck driver in the U.S is 46, compared to the median age of a U.S. worker being 42.
  • The trucking industry needs to recruit nearly 1.1 million new drivers by 2026 to keep up with demand.
  • Trucking companies tried to fix a major problem by offering drivers a bonus of $20,000, still didn't fill the shortage.
  • In 2018 the turnover rate at large truckload carriers was 90% due to the driver shortage.
  • Twisted Truckers posted a decline of 23% in new driver entrants in 2020.
  • The American Trucking Association reported in 2020 that the shortage could rise to 160,000 by 2028.
  • Truck companies hired 40,000 new drivers in 2019 only, insufficient for the increasing demand.
  • Approximately 900,000 driver positions are filled annually, though 160,000 of those remain vacant.
  • One cause of the shortage is the average retirement age for a truck driver is 55.
  • Driver shortage was number 1 critical issue in the trucking industry 1
  • Truck drivers aged 45-54 have had the highest overall employment level in trucking from 2003-2019.
  • The industry had a shortage of 51,000 drivers at the end of 2017.
  • More than 60 percent of all freight transported annually in the U.S. is hauled by trucks.

Table of Contents

In today’s fast-paced world, the transportation sector plays a pivotal role in connecting continents, countries, and cities. However, this critical industry is currently facing a major challenge – a substantial shortage of truck drivers. In this blog post, we’ll delve into the truck driver shortage statistics, exploring the dimensions of the problem, its underlying causes, and potential implications. We aim to give you a clear picture of this global issue and its potential impact on logistics and the wider economy. Buckle up for a statistical journey into the world of truck driving.

The Latest Truck Driver Shortage Statistics Unveiled

In 2017, the transportation sector was short approximately 60,800 drivers.

The statistic, ‘In 2017, the transportation sector was short approximately 60,800 drivers’ casts daylight on a substantial issue facing the trucking industry. By underscoring an astounding shortage of drivers, this data drives home the pressing demand for a workforce that supports the backbone of our goods transportation network. It is a red-flag indicator, highlighting the magnitude of the truck driver deficit and opening dialogue for potential solutions within a blog post centered around Truck Driver Shortage Statistics. This figure puts numerical weight to the problem, enriches our understanding of the industry climate, and sets a factual groundwork for meaningful discourse.

By 2028, the trucking industry is predicted to fall short by 160,000 drivers if current trends hold.

The projection that the trucking industry will be slammed with a deficit of 160,000 drivers by 2028 is a critical cog in the grand machinery of the sector, seen through the lens of a blog post on Truck Driver Shortage Statistics. Picture the essence of such a deficit; it translates into a compromised supply chain infrastructure carrying nationwide impact. Ripples will permeate through various subsets of the economy – the annual transportation of trillions of dollars’ worth of goods might be at risk, potential bottlenecks in logistics could amplify, and the persistent hike in goods shipment costs could become almost inevitable. Furthermore, the industries that inherently rely on trucking logistics may need to factor in this impending conundrum while deciding their future strategies. Unveiling these nuances of shortage statistics has implications beyond just numbers, reflecting the integral part trucking plays in maintaining the lifeline of the U.S economy.

In 2018, trucking moves 71.4% of the nation’s freight, needing more drivers.

Unraveling the extensive layers within the notable statistic ‘In 2018, trucking moves 71.4% of the nation’s freight, needing more drivers’, underscores the pulse of the predicament in the trucking industry – a growing driver shortage. A staggering 71.4% share of the nation’s freight moved by trucks speaks volumes about the industry’s pivotal role in maintaining the flow of goods and essentials across the country. However, the latter part of the statistic signals warning bells as it accentuates the rising need for more drivers – a void growing larger every year. Hence, in the narrative of a blog post on truck driver shortage statistics, this figure provides a striking context – laying bare the acute need for remedial action in terms of recruitment, retention, and improvement of working conditions in the trucking industry.

The median age for a truck driver in the U.S is 46, compared to the median age of a U.S. worker being 42.

The revelation of the median age for a truck driver in the U.S being 46, notably higher than the U.S worker median of 42, is of significant relevance in a blog post exploring Truck Driver Shortage Statistics. This age distinction exposes the essence of a looming shortage as it suggests an imminent mass retirement void and highlights the industry’s difficulty in attracting younger entrants. Subsequently, this could lead to an escalating deficit in drivers, thereby disrupting the supply chain, and necessitating an examination of the recruitment and retention strategies in the truck-driving profession.

The trucking industry needs to recruit nearly 1.1 million new drivers by 2026 to keep up with demand.

Laying the groundwork for a riveting conversation about Truck Driver Shortage Statistics, imagine a future where the absence of fresh talent leads to a gap in the industry that powers commerce – the trucking industry. Envision a scenario where it must usher in about 1.1 million new drivers by 2026 just to satiate demand. This staggering figure isn’t mere conjecture, but an indicative signal of an impending deficit that could knock the rhythm of trade and industry off kilter. This overwhelming need for drivers underscores the quite pressing narrative of how crucial it is to navigate and abate the problem at hand.

Trucking companies tried to fix a major problem by offering drivers a bonus of $20,000, still didn’t fill the shortage.

Highlighting the statistic that even with a generous bonus of $20,000, trucking companies could not eradicate their driver shortage underscores the magnitude of the current crisis within the trucking industry. In the context of a blog post dedicated to truck driver shortage statistics, it reveals the drastic measures companies are taking to attract drivers, while simultaneously showcasing how these strategies can fail. It illustrates a profound disconnect between the incentives offered by trucking companies and the needs or desires of potential drivers, hinting towards deeper systemic issues that could be driving this shortage. As such, this figure invites readers to delve further into the multifaceted dynamics of the trucking industry’s labor shortage.

In 2018 the turnover rate at large truckload carriers was 90% due to the driver shortage.

Emerging acutely from the groundswell of data on truck driver shortages, the 2018 statistic revealing a staggering 90% turnover rate at large truckload carriers opens up an intriguing narrative of workforce instability in this industry. It unmistakably imprints the magnitude of the problem, hinting at a turbulent employment landscape where companies continually grapple with driver attrition. Providing a measure for the instability, this fact underscores the urgency for solutions aimed at recruitment and retention, thereby shaping a critical foundation of the conversation around truck driver shortage and its overarching implications for the economy and logistics sector, essential in informing the discourse this blog post seeks to stimulate.

Twisted Truckers posted a decline of 23% in new driver entrants in 2020.

The plunge of 23% in new driver enlistment for Twisted Truckers in 2020 casts a chilling shadow over the bulk freight industry. This dip isn’t just a blinking red light on Twisted Truckers dashboard but a pressing concern for the entire trucking arena, intensifying the problem of driver shortage. With fewer drivers stepping into the rig, the pressure severely mounts on the existing workforce, potentially leading to burnouts and further departures. This statistic stealthily unearths the looming crisis of the unseen heroes who literally drive the economy, a crisis that could put the brakes on critical supply chains across the board.

The American Trucking Association reported in 2020 that the shortage could rise to 160,000 by 2028.

Painting a vivid picture of the future, the statistic from the American Trucking Association echoes a stark warning — by 2028, the deficit of truck drivers could soar up to an astounding 160,000. This potential reality signifies far-reaching effects on not just the trucking industry but also the broader U.S. economy. Given that the trucking serves as the lifeblood of supply chains and a bellwether for business activity, such dramatic driver shortage could hamper delivery speeds, increase freight costs and create ripple effects that could upset the balance of supply and demand. Thus, this figure inscribed in the annals of Truck Driver Shortage Statistics is an alarm bell, urging timely action to institute measures to bolster the workforce in the trucking industry.

Truck companies hired 40,000 new drivers in 2019 only, insufficient for the increasing demand.

In the heart of rising demand, let’s set the backdrop with a compelling figure: Truck companies brought on board 40,000 new drivers in 2019 alone. However, daunting as this figure may seem, it stumbled short of fulfilling the escalating appetite. This statistic serves as a poignant reminder of the widening chasm between the supply and demand in the truck driving industry, underlining a critical shortage problem. Unpacking this further, you’ll discover the ripple effects influencing wage rates, delivery times, and overall industry health, illuminating the urgency in addressing this inherent imbalance explored in the blog on Truck Driver Shortage Statistics.

Approximately 900,000 driver positions are filled annually, though 160,000 of those remain vacant.

Brightly highlighting the gravity of the truck driver shortage scenario, the fact that annually close to 900,000 driver positions get filled yet a staggering 160,000 of them still wind up vacant is an alarming reality. This number not only reflects the growing demand for truck drivers but also exposes the industry’s struggle to attract and retain enough qualified individuals. The sheer volume of the vacancies, despite huge recruitment efforts, emphasises that this shortage issue is far from trivial and potentially has critical implications on supply chains, the delivery of goods, and ultimately, the functioning of the economy.

One cause of the shortage is the average retirement age for a truck driver is 55.

Painting a landscape of the predicament faced by the trucking industry, the fact that truck drivers typically hang up their keys at an average age of 55 cascades into a defining factor in spawning shortages. It doesn’t just reveal the impending exit of seasoned drivers, but also highlights the criticality of fueling the influx of a younger workforce prepared to pick up the baton. Given the magnitude and pace at which retirements are mounting, thrusting the industry into a difficult corner, these statistics delineate how the ticking retirement clock further throttles the industry, perpetuating the truck driver shortage crisis. This paves the path to understanding the necessity of actions and reforms targeting talent supply, particularly among younger demographics, to rejuvenate the industry’s fading workforce.

Driver shortage was number 1 critical issue in the trucking industry 1

The revelation that a driver shortage has snagged the top spot as a critical issue in the trucking industry underscores the considerable weight of this problem, serving as the pulse of this blog post about Truck Driver Shortage Statistics. It sounds a glaring alarm across all stakeholders from fleet managers to policy makers, bringing to the forefront the urgent need for effective strategies to address the manpower deficit. This statistic not only frames the current narrative about impacts on supply chain capacity, efficiency and costs, but potentially sheds light on evolving labor market dynamics, setting the stage for targeted intervention within the trucking industry.

Truck drivers aged 45-54 have had the highest overall employment level in trucking from 2003-2019.

Unveiling the age landscape of the trucking industry, the statistic delineating truck drivers aged 45-54 sustaining the highest employment rate from 2003 to 2019 illuminates the spine of the narrative on Truck Driver Shortage Statistics. It unfurls critical insights into the dominant age group, thereby raising concerns about an impending shortage of truck drivers due to the possible retirement of the largely middle-aged workforce. Additionally, it underscores an implicit challenge in attracting younger generations into the industry. Without a consistent influx of newer, younger drivers, the industry could face severe shortages, disrupting supply chains and the economy. This statistic, thus, is an alarming bell tolling the need for strategic changes to ensure the continuous drive of the trucking fraternity.

The industry had a shortage of 51,000 drivers at the end of 2017.

Capturing the urgency and gravity of the trucking industry’s plight, a foghorn of concern signals from the stark statistical chasm of a 51,000 driver shortage at the close of 2017. This startling figure punctuates the narrative highlighting the industry’s systemic issue of attracting and retaining talent, a symptom of deeper operational hardships that reverberate across economic sectors, ultimately affecting supply chains and impacting the smooth delivery of goods. Lifelines of our commerce like arteries pulsating with the lifeblood of products, these essential transport veins demand vital attention as the statistic uncovers the scale of an industry-wide issue that requires comprehensive and strategic solutions.

More than 60 percent of all freight transported annually in the U.S. is hauled by trucks.

The compelling statistic that over 60% of annual freight in the U.S. is transported by trucks underscores the essential role that truck drivers play in the nation’s economy. It infuses a sense of urgency into our conversation about truck driver shortages. Clearly, any significant shortfall in this workforce can ripple through the entire supply chain, stalling the delivery of goods, escalating prices, and restraining economic growth. This latent vulnerability makes understanding truck driver shortage statistics a necessity—not merely for those within the transportation industry, but for anyone invested in the efficient functioning of the U.S. economy.

Conclusion

The alarming statistics of truck driver shortage underscore a critical issue in the logistics industry. persistent lack of skilled drivers is a main factor contributing to disruptions in supply chains, inflated freight costs, and overall economic instability. Better wages, improved working conditions, and proactive industry policies are needed to attract and retain competent drivers to alleviate this crisis.

References

0. – https://www.www.thetruckersreport.com

1. – https://www.wsbt.com

2. – https://www.www.cnbc.com

3. – https://www.www.natso.com

4. – https://www.www.usatoday.com

5. – https://www.www.trucking.org

6. – https://www.postandcourieradvertising.com

7. – https://www.www.truckingschool.com

8. – https://www.www.freightwaves.com

9. – https://www.knowledge-leader.colliers.com

10. – https://www.www.businessinsider.com

11. – https://www.trucker.com

12. – https://www.www.spglobal.com

13. – https://www.smartcarrierbags.co.uk

FAQs

What is causing the current truck driver shortage?

Multiple factors contribute to the truck driver shortage. These factors include an aging workforce, strenuous working conditions such as long hours and time away from home, and the rising demand for freight transportation resulting from increased online shopping and deliveries.

How significant is the truck driver shortage?

The American Trucking Associations reports that the shortage could exceed 160,000 drivers by 2028, which could significantly impact the delivery of goods and services across the country.

How does the truck driver shortage impact the economy?

The trucking industry is an essential component of the U.S. economy, transporting the majority of freight. Its shortage can lead to increased transportation costs, delivery delays, and even potential out-of-stock situations, disturbing various sectors like retail, manufacturing, and services.

What are the possible solutions to address the truck driver shortage?

Several strategies could alleviate the shortage, including raising pay rates, changing regulations to allow younger people to become long-haul truckers, improving working conditions, and increasing recruitment and retention efforts.

Has COVID-19 impacted the truck driver shortage?

Yes, the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the truck driver shortage. Due to health concerns, many older truck drivers opted for early retirement or left the industry, which worsened the already-existing driver shortage. At the same time, the pandemic has sparked an increase in demand for shipped goods as more people shop online, further intensifying the shortage problem.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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