GITNUX REPORT 2024

Alarming Trampoline Injuries: Facts Revealed About Serious Health Risks

Uncovering the Alarming Reality of Trampoline Injuries: Statistics You Need to Know Now.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

Statistic 1

Children under 6 years old account for 22% of trampoline injuries

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48% of trampoline injuries in children aged 5 and under result in fractures or dislocations

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Children aged 5-14 years have the highest rate of trampoline-related injuries

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Boys are slightly more likely to be injured on trampolines than girls (52% vs 48%)

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The average age of children sustaining trampoline-related injuries is 9 years

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The risk of injury is 14 times higher for children under 6 compared to older children

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Children aged 6-14 account for 67% of trampoline injuries

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Children under 6 are 14 times more likely to be injured than older children on trampolines

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50% of trampoline injuries in children under 5 result in fractures or dislocations

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Children aged 5-9 have the highest rate of trampoline-related fractures

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Children under 10 account for 75% of trampoline injuries

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The average age for trampoline-related spinal cord injuries is 11 years

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Nearly 100,000 trampoline-related injuries occur annually in the United States

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Trampoline injuries result in approximately 3,000 hospitalizations annually in the US

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Trampoline-related injuries have increased by 140% between 2004 and 2014

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Trampoline injuries account for 3% of all sports-related injuries in children

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Trampoline injuries peak during the summer months

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Trampoline injuries result in approximately 500,000 emergency department visits annually worldwide

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Trampoline injuries account for 1 in 200 injury-related pediatric emergency department visits

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Trampoline injuries have increased by 23% in the last decade

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Trampoline injuries are responsible for 1 in 1,000 pediatric hospitalizations

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The average hospital stay for a trampoline-related injury is 3 days

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Trampoline-related injuries result in approximately $1 billion in healthcare costs annually in the US

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The average cost of a trampoline-related injury treated in the emergency department is $800

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Trampoline injuries account for 3.6% of all sports-related injuries in children under 14

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95% of trampoline injuries occur at home

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50% of trampoline injuries occur on the mat itself

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27% of trampoline injuries occur when a person lands on the springs or frame

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80% of trampoline injuries occur on full-sized outdoor trampolines

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90% of trampoline injuries in children under 5 occur at home

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25% of trampoline injuries occur on the trampoline frame or springs

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Trampoline parks have seen a 1500% increase in injuries from 2011 to 2017

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20% of trampoline injuries occur at public facilities or trampoline parks

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The use of safety nets reduces the risk of injury by 50%

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Padding on trampoline frames and springs reduces the risk of injury by 70%

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Adult supervision reduces the risk of injury by 50%

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The use of trampoline ladders reduces the risk of injury for young children by 40%

Statistic 38

Regular inspection and maintenance of trampolines can reduce the risk of injury by 30%

Statistic 39

The use of protective equipment (e.g., helmets, knee pads) can reduce the risk of injury by 20%

Statistic 40

Proper placement of trampolines (away from structures and on level ground) can reduce injury risk by 35%

Statistic 41

Limiting trampoline use to one person at a time can reduce injury risk by 75%

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75% of trampoline injuries occur when multiple people are jumping simultaneously

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The risk of injury is 2-3 times higher for children using trampolines at home compared to in a supervised training facility

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Somersaults and flips increase the risk of cervical spine injuries

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40% of trampoline injuries are caused by falling off the trampoline

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15% of trampoline injuries occur when colliding with another person

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The risk of injury increases by 75% when more than one person is on the trampoline

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60% of trampoline injuries occur during the afternoon and early evening hours

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35% of trampoline injuries occur when attempting stunts or flips

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40% of trampoline injuries occur in the presence of adult supervision

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Fractures make up 29% of trampoline injuries

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Head and neck injuries account for 10-17% of all trampoline-related injuries

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Sprains and strains account for 27% of trampoline injuries

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Approximately 20% of spinal cord injuries from sports and recreation activities are caused by trampolines

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Concussions account for 10% of all trampoline injuries that result in an emergency department visit

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Bruises and contusions make up 20% of trampoline injuries

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Lacerations account for 5% of trampoline injuries

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Ankle injuries make up 30% of all lower extremity injuries on trampolines

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Upper extremity injuries account for 30% of all trampoline-related injuries

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Soft tissue injuries account for 35% of all trampoline-related injuries

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Fractures of the upper extremities account for 60% of all trampoline-related fractures

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Head injuries account for 10-15% of all trampoline-related emergency department visits

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Lower extremity injuries account for 40% of all trampoline-related injuries

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Spinal cord injuries make up 1-2% of all trampoline-related injuries

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Summary

  • Nearly 100,000 trampoline-related injuries occur annually in the United States
  • Children under 6 years old account for 22% of trampoline injuries
  • Fractures make up 29% of trampoline injuries
  • 75% of trampoline injuries occur when multiple people are jumping simultaneously
  • Head and neck injuries account for 10-17% of all trampoline-related injuries
  • Trampoline injuries result in approximately 3,000 hospitalizations annually in the US
  • 48% of trampoline injuries in children aged 5 and under result in fractures or dislocations
  • Sprains and strains account for 27% of trampoline injuries
  • 95% of trampoline injuries occur at home
  • The risk of injury is 2-3 times higher for children using trampolines at home compared to in a supervised training facility
  • Approximately 20% of spinal cord injuries from sports and recreation activities are caused by trampolines
  • Children aged 5-14 years have the highest rate of trampoline-related injuries
  • 50% of trampoline injuries occur on the mat itself
  • Concussions account for 10% of all trampoline injuries that result in an emergency department visit
  • The use of safety nets reduces the risk of injury by 50%

Jumping into danger: The exhilarating world of trampolines comes with a spring-loaded surprise – nearly 100,000 injuries annually in the US, where even the mat itself seems to have a vendetta, causing 50% of all injuries. From fractures to concussions, this blog post explores the ups and downs of trampoline mishaps, where children under 6 are taking on the challenge with a surprising 22% share of the injury pie. So, before you bounce back into the action, beware the statistics that are truly eye-opening... or should we say, eye-closing.

Age-related Statistics

  • Children under 6 years old account for 22% of trampoline injuries
  • 48% of trampoline injuries in children aged 5 and under result in fractures or dislocations
  • Children aged 5-14 years have the highest rate of trampoline-related injuries
  • Boys are slightly more likely to be injured on trampolines than girls (52% vs 48%)
  • The average age of children sustaining trampoline-related injuries is 9 years
  • The risk of injury is 14 times higher for children under 6 compared to older children
  • Children aged 6-14 account for 67% of trampoline injuries
  • Children under 6 are 14 times more likely to be injured than older children on trampolines
  • 50% of trampoline injuries in children under 5 result in fractures or dislocations
  • Children aged 5-9 have the highest rate of trampoline-related fractures
  • Children under 10 account for 75% of trampoline injuries
  • The average age for trampoline-related spinal cord injuries is 11 years

Interpretation

Trampolines: where bouncing meets broken bones! These statistics paint a clear picture - a playground favorite can quickly become a parent's nightmare. With children under 6 making up a significant chunk of trampoline injuries, it seems the real risk isn't just in the height of the jump, but in the depth of the fracture. So, next time your little one wants to bounce, maybe suggest a less bone-breaking activity, like bubble wrap popping - equally fun and much safer!

Frequency and Prevalence

  • Nearly 100,000 trampoline-related injuries occur annually in the United States
  • Trampoline injuries result in approximately 3,000 hospitalizations annually in the US
  • Trampoline-related injuries have increased by 140% between 2004 and 2014
  • Trampoline injuries account for 3% of all sports-related injuries in children
  • Trampoline injuries peak during the summer months
  • Trampoline injuries result in approximately 500,000 emergency department visits annually worldwide
  • Trampoline injuries account for 1 in 200 injury-related pediatric emergency department visits
  • Trampoline injuries have increased by 23% in the last decade
  • Trampoline injuries are responsible for 1 in 1,000 pediatric hospitalizations
  • The average hospital stay for a trampoline-related injury is 3 days
  • Trampoline-related injuries result in approximately $1 billion in healthcare costs annually in the US
  • The average cost of a trampoline-related injury treated in the emergency department is $800
  • Trampoline injuries account for 3.6% of all sports-related injuries in children under 14

Interpretation

Trampolines: the bouncy enigma that brings both joy and broken bones. With nearly 100,000 trampoline-related injuries annually in the US alone, it seems the thrill of soaring through the air comes with a side of hospital visits. The stats don't lie – a 140% increase in trampoline injuries between 2004 and 2014 means we're bouncing into danger at an alarming rate. From summer peaks to hefty healthcare costs, trampolines might just be the sneaky ninja of sports, quietly causing chaos while we're busy having a ball. So, next time you take a leap of faith, remember: gravity always wins.

Location of Injuries

  • 95% of trampoline injuries occur at home
  • 50% of trampoline injuries occur on the mat itself
  • 27% of trampoline injuries occur when a person lands on the springs or frame
  • 80% of trampoline injuries occur on full-sized outdoor trampolines
  • 90% of trampoline injuries in children under 5 occur at home
  • 25% of trampoline injuries occur on the trampoline frame or springs
  • Trampoline parks have seen a 1500% increase in injuries from 2011 to 2017
  • 20% of trampoline injuries occur at public facilities or trampoline parks

Interpretation

Trampolines: the great equalizer of gravity, turning backyards into battlegrounds and creating a kaleidoscope of injury statistics. With the sharp wit of a spring recoiling and the precise impact of a landing gone awry, these numbers tell a tall tale of home-based calamity. Beware the treacherous mat, the unforgiving springs, and the ominous frame lurking beneath the bounce. Trampoline parks, the new frontier of airborne adventure, have seen a meteoric rise in casualties, proving that even in a controlled environment, gravity can still be a formidable foe. So, whether you're a backyard daredevil or a trampoline park enthusiast, remember: the only thing flying higher than you is the risk of injury.

Prevention Measures

  • The use of safety nets reduces the risk of injury by 50%
  • Padding on trampoline frames and springs reduces the risk of injury by 70%
  • Adult supervision reduces the risk of injury by 50%
  • The use of trampoline ladders reduces the risk of injury for young children by 40%
  • Regular inspection and maintenance of trampolines can reduce the risk of injury by 30%
  • The use of protective equipment (e.g., helmets, knee pads) can reduce the risk of injury by 20%
  • Proper placement of trampolines (away from structures and on level ground) can reduce injury risk by 35%
  • Limiting trampoline use to one person at a time can reduce injury risk by 75%

Interpretation

Trampoline safety measures may just be the ultimate bounce-back solution for injury prevention. From safety nets to padding and adult supervision, it seems the leap towards injury-free fun is not just a hop away but a calculated bounce in the right direction. With statistics jumping in favor of precautions such as regular inspection, protective gear, and limiting the trampoline monopoly to one person at a time, it's clear that when it comes to trampolining, a little boost in safety standards can lead to a giant leap in injury risk reduction. So, before you spring into action, make sure your safety game is properly sprung!

Risk Factors

  • 75% of trampoline injuries occur when multiple people are jumping simultaneously
  • The risk of injury is 2-3 times higher for children using trampolines at home compared to in a supervised training facility
  • Somersaults and flips increase the risk of cervical spine injuries
  • 40% of trampoline injuries are caused by falling off the trampoline
  • 15% of trampoline injuries occur when colliding with another person
  • The risk of injury increases by 75% when more than one person is on the trampoline
  • 60% of trampoline injuries occur during the afternoon and early evening hours
  • 35% of trampoline injuries occur when attempting stunts or flips
  • 40% of trampoline injuries occur in the presence of adult supervision

Interpretation

Trampolines may seem like a spring-loaded wonderland of fun, but the statistics paint a different picture. With 75% of injuries occurring when multiple people are jumping simultaneously, it's clear that sharing is not always caring on these bouncy platforms. From risky somersaults increasing the chance of cervical spine injuries to the alarming fact that 2-3 times more injuries happen to children using trampolines at home instead of supervised facilities, it's evident that bouncing responsibly is key. So, next time you're tempted to attempt a daring flip or stunt on a trampoline, remember that the laws of gravity apply even with adult supervision around - and perhaps stick to bouncing during daylight hours, to avoid becoming a somersault statistic under the moonlight.

Types of Injuries

  • Fractures make up 29% of trampoline injuries
  • Head and neck injuries account for 10-17% of all trampoline-related injuries
  • Sprains and strains account for 27% of trampoline injuries
  • Approximately 20% of spinal cord injuries from sports and recreation activities are caused by trampolines
  • Concussions account for 10% of all trampoline injuries that result in an emergency department visit
  • Bruises and contusions make up 20% of trampoline injuries
  • Lacerations account for 5% of trampoline injuries
  • Ankle injuries make up 30% of all lower extremity injuries on trampolines
  • Upper extremity injuries account for 30% of all trampoline-related injuries
  • Soft tissue injuries account for 35% of all trampoline-related injuries
  • Fractures of the upper extremities account for 60% of all trampoline-related fractures
  • Head injuries account for 10-15% of all trampoline-related emergency department visits
  • Lower extremity injuries account for 40% of all trampoline-related injuries
  • Spinal cord injuries make up 1-2% of all trampoline-related injuries

Interpretation

Trampolines: Where gravity meets comedy, fractures make up 29% of the crash landing repertoire, while head and neck injuries star in their dramatic routine at 10-17%. Sprains and strains jive for 27% of the spotlight, with spinal cord injuries sneaking in for a surprise encore at 20%. Concussions show up fashionably late at 10%, while the supporting cast of bruises, lacerations, and contusions bring their own flair to the performance. Ankle injuries and upper extremity mishaps fight for dominance at 30% each, while soft tissue injuries steal the show at an impressive 35%. Whether you're breakdancing with fractured limbs or waltzing with a sprained ankle, the trampoline stage demands your attention—and maybe a helmet.

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