GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Legacy Admissions Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Legacy Admissions Statistics

  • Between 10% to 25% of students at top universities are legacy admits.
  • 42% of private institutions and 6% of public institutions consider legacy status in their admissions process.
  • Harvard accepted about 34% of legacy applicants as opposed to 6% of nonlegacy applicants from 2010 to 2015.
  • At Princeton University, legacy applicants were accepted at a rate of nearly 30%.
  • Over the decade ending in 2017, nearly a third of all legacy applicants to Princeton University got in.
  • Legacy students at Notre Dame University make up an impressive 22% of the student body.
  • At Dartmouth, the acceptance rate for legacy students has hovered around 40% over the past decade.
  • Legacies make up about 12% of the current undergraduate population at the University of Pennsylvania.
  • 29% of the incoming class of 2020 at Georgetown University were legacy students.
  • Stanford University’s legacy acceptance rate is about three times higher than the general admission rate.
  • At the University of Virginia, nearly 47 percent of legacy students who applied were accepted in 2008.
  • Brown University admitted just under 9% of legacy applicants for the class of 2023.
  • MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) is one of the US schools that does not consider legacy in its admissions.
  • 20% of admitted students into Yale's class of 2017 were legacies.
  • At Columbia University, legacy students make up about 15% of the student body.
  • Legacy students at Cornell make up approximately 16.7% of the student body.
  • Duke University, in 2021, enrolled 13 percent of incoming first-years as legacies.
  • At the University of Southern California, the acceptance rate for legacy students was about 42%
  • Legacy preferences increase one's chances of admission by 19.3 percentage points at elite schools.
  • For top schools, excluding the Ivy League, about 14% of students are legacies.

Table of Contents

Legacy admissions – a preferential treatment policy addressing college applicants who are related to alumni of that institution, has long been a controversial topic in the field of higher education. In this blog post, we will delve into the rich maze of statistics connected to legacy admissions, shedding light on percentages, acceptance rates, and how this practice impacts the diversity and fairness of college admissions. Enhancing the understanding of these statistics may help us engage in more informed discussions about legacy admissions.

The Latest Legacy Admissions Statistics Unveiled

Between 10% to 25% of students at top universities are legacy admits.

Highlighting that 10% to 25% of students at top universities are legacy admits can serve as a springboard for discussions on the importance and potential implications of legacy admissions. In examining this figure, one can plausibly argue for its relevance in questions pertaining to socio-economic diversity, educational equity, and university admission policies. The statistic shows that a considerable percentage of the student population benefits from a specific form of privilege, which could be illuminating for readers questioning the fairness of admission processes or the representativeness of the student body at a highly-ranked institution in a blog post about Legacy Admissions Statistics.

42% of private institutions and 6% of public institutions consider legacy status in their admissions process.

Unveiling a potent narrative in the realm of legacy admissions statistics, the figure that spells out 42% of private and a mere 6% of public institutions bearing in mind legacy status in their admission process throws light on a significant divergence. It implicitly underscores prevailing disparities between private and public institutions when it comes to giving weight to an applicant’s familial ties to the institution. This discrepancy spirals into a larger discourse about the role of socioeconomic status, college accessibility, and the hierarchy of privilege in the prickly terrain of admissions – touchpoints that are vital to tackling the subject matter thoroughly alongside numerical data insights.

Harvard accepted about 34% of legacy applicants as opposed to 6% of nonlegacy applicants from 2010 to 2015.

Examining the text, one gazes upon a stark disparity in acceptance rates at Harvard University between legacy and nonlegacy applicants from 2010 to 2015. With a hefty 34% of legacy applicants earning their acceptance letters, compared against a mere 6% of nonlegacy hopefuls, it’s impossible to ignore the critical role that familial ties play in the admissions process. As we delve into the intricacies of legacy admissions statistics, this nugget of information serves as a symbolic cornerstone, characterizing a complex system enshrined in tradition, privilege, and familial bonds.

At Princeton University, legacy applicants were accepted at a rate of nearly 30%.

Highlighting the statistic that nearly 30% of legacy applicants at Princeton University were accepted presents an intriguing aspect of the blog post on Legacy Admission Statistics. It not only showcases the likelihood of legacy applicants clinching an acceptance, but also stirs investigations into how much weight the institution places on lineage as opposed to other qualifications. Understanding the significance of this phenomenon can shape perspectives about fairness in college admissions, thereby sparking engaging discussions amongst readers. Moreover, such a high acceptance rate for legacies could influence prospective applicants with familial ties to Princeton in their decision-making process.

Over the decade ending in 2017, nearly a third of all legacy applicants to Princeton University got in.

The alarming statistic, noting nearly a third of all legacy applicants securing admission to Princeton University over the decade ending in 2017, serves as a critical cornerstone for understanding the influence of legacy status on university admissions. In a blog post dissecting Legacy Admissions Statistics, it paints a revealing picture of legacy advantage, unmasking the often opaque nature of university admissions. This striking figure is like a guiding star leading the discussion, prompting us to delve deeper into controversial questions concerning fairness, equity, and potential biases prevalent in our higher education system.

Legacy students at Notre Dame University make up an impressive 22% of the student body.

Reflecting on Notre Dame University, a noteworthy 22% of the student populace are legacy students, illuminating a significant trend in admissions. Unveiling this percentage provides a perspective on the weightage that familial heritage carries during the admissions process, adding contour to the discourse on university admission practices. This numerical testament of legacy admissions, nigh a quarter of all students, underscores the extent to which the tradition threads itself through the university’s fabric, enriching the narrative of the blog post about Legacy Admissions Statistics.

At Dartmouth, the acceptance rate for legacy students has hovered around 40% over the past decade.

Highlighting Dartmouth’s legacy admission rate of around 40% over the past decade provides a revealing insight into the influential role that familial ties play in college admissions. This figure dramatically underscores the preferential treatment offered to legacy applicants at prestigious institutions, a phenomenon which is a critical focus of the blog post on Legacy Admissions Statistics. By unmasking the privileged pathway for legacy students, this statistic invites a spirited discourse on the equity and fairness in the college admission process.

Legacies make up about 12% of the current undergraduate population at the University of Pennsylvania.

Painting a vivid picture with raw numbers, the statistic reveals that around 12% of University of Pennsylvania’s undergraduate body comprise of legacies. Such an insight woven into a blog about Legacy Admissions Statistics undoubtedly amplifies its depth. It accentuates the tangible influence of legacies in highly prestigious universities and can form a foundation for a thought-provoking discussion about fairness, opportunity, and equality in higher education admission processes. Thus, this statistic stands as a factual cornerstone giving credibility and weight to arguments and perspectives shared in the blog post about Legacy Admissions.

29% of the incoming class of 2020 at Georgetown University were legacy students.

Unearthing the influence of heritage on university admissions, the staggering 29% legacy quota in Georgetown University’s 2020 incoming class underscores the role family ties play. This figure is pivotal in the discussion of Legacy Admission Statistics as it highlights a deep-seated trend within prestigious academia—where ancestral connections continue to sway admission dynamics. The strength of this statistic lies not just in underlining the magnitude of legacy admissions, but also in sparking a conversation about societal equity, diversity in student bodies, and the potency of merit versus lineage in higher education pathways.

Stanford University’s legacy acceptance rate is about three times higher than the general admission rate.

In the realm of Legacy Admissions Statistics, Stanford University’s data offers an intriguing perspective. The striking revelation that the university’s legacy acceptance rate is three times higher than the general admission rate instantly draws attention. This influential figure is not only important but key in understanding the broader landscape of legacy admissions, as it speaks volumes about the university’s preference for legacy applicants. Such a statistic can considerably affect public perceptions and spark conversations regarding university admissions policies, educational equity, and the complexities of navigating elite higher education.

At the University of Virginia, nearly 47 percent of legacy students who applied were accepted in 2008.

In shedding light on the subject of Legacy Admissions Statistics, the data reflecting that nearly 47 percent of legacy students who applied at the University of Virginia were accepted in 2008 serves as a compelling entry point. The statistic underscores the advantage legacy applicants may have, feeding the ongoing debate about whether such practices promote nepotism and erode meritocracy. Beyond that, it provides a measurable demonstration for the impacts of legacy admissions at elite institutions and their implications on educational equity, diversity, and social mobility.

Brown University admitted just under 9% of legacy applicants for the class of 2023.

Shining a spotlight on the selectivity of top-tier institutions, Brown University’s striking statistic of admitting just below 9% of legacy applicants for the class of 2023 underscores the competitive nature of legacy admissions. In the realm of legacy admissions statistics, this figure serves to challenge common perceptions of guaranteed admissions for legacy candidates, highlighting a rigorous selection process regardless of family history. It further balances the narrative, adding substance to the ongoing discussion about fairness and privilege in admissions, thus making it a noteworthy reference in a blog post on this topic.

MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) is one of the US schools that does not consider legacy in its admissions.

Highlighting the policy of a prestigious institution like MIT, which disregards legacy in its admission process, serves as an interesting point of contrast in a blog post about legacy admissions statistics. This deviation from a widespread practice among US colleges and universities brings something different to the conversation. It’s a compelling reminder that not all schools adhere to this tradition, and instead prioritize merit-based criteria. This facet in the discussion can potentially spark discourse on the ethical implications and fairness of legacy admissions, adding depth and nuance to the overarching narrative.

20% of admitted students into Yale’s class of 2017 were legacies.

Diving into nuances of Legacy Admissions Statistics, the quotient of Yale’s class of 2017 being furnished by legacy students, a substantial 20%, boldly underscores an undeniable trend in elite education. This significant fraction stipulates that familial relations to Yale’s alumni could potentially sway the admissions scale, hence raising critical questions around fairness, diversity, and transparency. Consequently, this momentous proportion could inform substantial change in admissions policies or coalesce substantive weight to calls for reform, all while shedding light on intricate workings of prestigious institutions’ admissions processes.

At Columbia University, legacy students make up about 15% of the student body.

Highlighting that legacy students constitute roughly 15% of Columbia University’s student body serves as a compelling angle in a blog post about Legacy Admissions Statistics. It not only quantifies the extent to which familial ties to the institution possibly influence admissions, but also ignites a poignant discussion about the potential advantages, biases, and ethical considerations surrounding this practice. It is a critical data point that paints a vivid picture of the enrollment landscape, acting as a catalyst for exploring the broader implications and fostering further dialogue on whether legacy admissions uphold meritocracy or entrench privilege.

Legacy students at Cornell make up approximately 16.7% of the student body.

Delving into the realm of legacy admissions statistics, the revelation that approximately 16.7% of the Cornell student body consists of legacy students is a potent illustration of the institution’s deep-rooted tradition. Infused with the prestige of past generations, this calculation reflects the university’s inclination to value familial ties in its admissions strategy. As such, it subtly hints at the broader narrative of educational privilege and continuity, providing an invaluable talking point in any examination of the legacy admissions landscape.

Duke University, in 2021, enrolled 13 percent of incoming first-years as legacies.

Drawing attention to Duke University’s 2021 legacy enrolment figure of 13% cements a fundamental observation within the complex tapestry of legacy admissions statistics. It serves as a touchstone, illustrating the tangible influence of familial affiliations on the admissions process in prestigious academia. This metric provides a intriguing snapshot, fueling the conversation around equity and privilege in university admissions, acting as a checkpoint for how higher institutions continue to prioritize or de-prioritize legacy status, casting a light on how hereditary advantages potentially shape the future corridors of power and influence.

At the University of Southern California, the acceptance rate for legacy students was about 42%

The 42% acceptance rate for legacy students at the University of Southern California anchors a crucial part of the dialogue in the discourse on legacy admissions statistics. Undoubtedly, it demands attention as it signals a subtly woven thread of preference that could potentially intertwine a complex weave of advantages for children of alumni. Showcasing a striking divergence from the general acceptance rate, it propels a thought-provoking narrative concerning fairness and opportunity in university admissions. Thus this number tells an intimate tale of privilege and preferential treatment that may tinge the very fabric of meritocratic academia, thereby serving as a powerful talking point for our blog post on Legacy Admissions Statistics.

Legacy preferences increase one’s chances of admission by 19.3 percentage points at elite schools.

Navigating the enormity of context, ‘Legacy preferences increase one’s chances of admission by 19.3 percentage points at elite schools’ is a striking revelation that underscores the influence of familial ties on enrollment patterns at prestigious institutions. Infusing perspective into an insightful blog post on Legacy Admissions Statistics, this figure can be utilized to drive conversations about access, favoritism, and equal opportunities in the education sector. The breath-taking jump of nearly 20 percentage points linked to legacy status dramatically highlights disparities and poses critical questions that need to be addressed, making it an all-important cornerstone in the discourse of higher education admission policies.

For top schools, excluding the Ivy League, about 14% of students are legacies.

Spotlighting a remarkable figure: ‘For top schools, excluding the Ivy League, about 14% of students are legacies,’ unravels the entrenched reliance on family connections in elite educational institutions. This statistic echoes the concerning truth behind the curtain of prestigious academia – that, legacy admissions still hold significant sway. Within the discussion on Legacy Admissions Statistics, this fact arms us with understanding of the depth and scope of the legacy influence, challenging the principles of meritocracy, and stirring necessary debates on fairness and equal opportunities in higher education.

Conclusion

In reviewing the statistics surrounding Legacy Admissions, we ascertain a noticeable influence on acceptance rates in numerous higher education institutions. While the advantage varies across institutions, the data suggest a significant upward shift in admission rates for legacy students compared to their non-legacy counterparts. However, a deeper dive is required to address potential concerns over fairness and diversity in college admissions, balancing tradition with evolving ideals of meritocracy.

References

0. – https://www.www.insidehighered.com

1. – https://www.www.jstor.org

2. – https://www.dailytrojan.com

3. – https://www.www.reuters.com

4. – https://www.www.browndailyherald.com

5. – https://www.www.cavalierdaily.com

6. – https://www.www.dukechronicle.com

7. – https://www.www.usnews.com

8. – https://www.www.businessinsider.com

9. – https://www.stanfordreview.org

10. – https://www.college.harvard.edu

11. – https://www.dailypennsylvanian.com

12. – https://www.thebestschools.org

13. – https://www.www.nytimes.com

14. – https://www.columbiaspectator.com

15. – https://www.cornellsun.com

16. – https://www.www.washtimes.com

17. – https://www.yaledailynews.com

18. – https://www.dailynorthwestern.com

FAQs

What are Legacy Admissions?

Legacy Admissions refer to the preferential treatment given by an educational institution to the children or relatives of their alumni during the admission process.

What percentage of students in universities are typically legacy admissions?

The percentage can vary greatly by institution. Some studies report that at elite US colleges, around 10 to 25% of the student body could be composed of legacy students.

How much more likely is a legacy applicant to be admitted, compared to a non-legacy?

The benefit of being a legacy applicant varies by school. However, according to a study by Harvard University, being a legacy applicant can double the chances of admission.

Do all universities have a legacy admissions policy?

No, not all universities have a legacy admissions policy. The policy is primarily found in private US institutions, although it is not exclusive to them. Many top public and international institutions do not consider legacy status in admissions.

What are the criticisms of Legacy Admissions?

Critics argue that legacy admissions can perpetuate inequality in higher education since it advantages those who come from families with a history of higher education – often affluent, white families. They argue that it can limit diversity and give an unfair advantage in an already competitive process.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents