GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Hmrc Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Hmrc Statistics

  • As of 2020, HMRC's workforce numbered 57,598 employees.
  • HMRC collected a total of £585.1 billion in tax revenue in 2019-20.
  • In 2019, the tax gap estimated by HMRC was £31 billion.
  • As of 2020, there were 5.6 million Pay As You Earn (PAYE) schemes in the UK registered with HMRC.
  • The average customer call time to HMRC in 2020 was 9 minutes and 40 seconds.
  • In the tax year 2020–21, 11.5 million self-assessment tax returns were submitted to HMRC.
  • HMRC handed £9.2 billion back in overpaid income tax in 2018.
  • Around 29 million people paid income tax to HMRC in 2018-2019.
  • In 2018-19, HMRC collected over £50 billion in corporation tax in the UK.
  • HMRC mailed out nearly 28 million tax codes in 2018/19.
  • HMRC blocked nearly 1 million phishing scam attempts in 2018.
  • HMRC collected over £5 billion in inheritance tax in 2019-2020.
  • Over 100,000 civil servants from more than 170 industries were trained by HMRC to combat tax evasion in 2020.
  • The average HMRC employee has been with the department for around 14.41 years.
  • In 2017, HMRC rolled out 100 mobile units to reach remote areas for tax investigations.
  • In 2018, an estimated 415,000 people were underpaid the National Minimum Wage, recovered by HMRC.
  • HMRC processed 7.9 million tax rebates for the tax year 2019-2020.
  • VAT accounted for 21% of HMRC's tax receipts during the fiscal year 2018-19.

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HMRC (Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs) Statistics play a pivotal role in offering a comprehensive understanding of the UK’s taxation, benefits, credits, and other areas related to revenue collection. This article unravels the hidden narratives and themes within these numbers, providing an insightful perspective for policymakers, professionals, and individuals. We dive deep into the complexities of these statistics, reflecting on their implications for economic growth, wealth distribution, and public spending. Stay tuned as we decode the numerical maze of HMRC Statistics and their significant bearing on national finance.

The Latest Hmrc Statistics Unveiled

As of 2020, HMRC’s workforce numbered 57,598 employees.

Grasping the colossal size of HMRC’s workforce, standing at a staggering count of 57,598 employees as of 2020, offers a stark perspective into the dynamic machinery operating behind the veil of tax and customs authority. It underscores their colossal responsibility of managing the nation’s public finances, enforcing tax laws, and implementing government financial policies. This fact paints a vivid image of the administrative might, detailed division of labor, and diversity of roles at HMRC; from tax specialists and investigators to technology and customer service personnel, directly feeding into our understanding of HMRC’s intricate processes and expansive reach. In a blog post about HMRC statistics, this number becomes a significant baseline for the readers to truly appreciate the scale and scope of the organization’s operations.

HMRC collected a total of £585.1 billion in tax revenue in 2019-20.

In the realm of HMRC statistics, the notable figure of £585.1 billion collected in tax revenue for the 2019-20 fiscal year provides a crucial yardstick. It symbolizes the fiscal reach and capability of the HMRC, underlining its influential role in shaping the nation’s economy. This towering figure illuminates the depth of HMRC’s engagement with every pound sterling exchanged within the UK. Unpacking this fact further, it offers an insightful glimpse into the government’s income, informing decisions on public spending, budget allocations and fiscal policies in the UK.

In 2019, the tax gap estimated by HMRC was £31 billion.

The £31 billion tax gap estimated by HMRC in 2019 provides an intriguing insight into the challenges faced by the government in efficiently collecting taxes. It unquestionably colors the backdrop of HMRC operations, suggesting not all taxable income is being accurately reported or collected, thus exerting a considerable strain on the nation’s finances and services that are funded by taxpayer’s money. Therefore, it serves as a crucial metric in assessing HMRC’s effectiveness, influencing policy decisions, and providing readers with a deeper understanding of the broader fiscal landscape.

As of 2020, there were 5.6 million Pay As You Earn (PAYE) schemes in the UK registered with HMRC.

The illumination of the numerical reality, stating that in 2020 there were 5.6 million Pay As You Earn (PAYE) schemes registered with the HMRC in the UK, serves as a pulse check on the UK’s employment landscape. This quantum leap creates a labyrinth of interconnected tax-contributors, reflecting a thriving heartbeat pulsating through the arteries of the HMRC’s complex fiscal framework. It not only ascends as evidence of HMRC’s expansive influence and the reach of the PAYE system, but also provides insight into the magnitude of revenue collected, thereby influencing policy making and economic forecasts. Hence, the enormity of this figure gracefully waltzes into the realm of vital HMRC statistics being discussed in this blog post.

The average customer call time to HMRC in 2020 was 9 minutes and 40 seconds.

Peeling back the curtain on the inner workings of HMRC, the statistic of the average customer call time resonating at 9 minutes and 40 seconds in 2020 offers a valuable insight into customer experience. In the matrix of HMRC statistics presented in this blog, this particularly highlights the efficiency of the service, reflecting the time taken to handle an individual query. In an era where time is money, a shorter call time translates directly to faster problem resolution for the public, and indirectly mirrors to possible improvements in HMRC’s service provision, staff performance, and customer satisfaction rate, grounding the credibility of the department. Thus, it plays an instrumental role in shaping the public’s perception of the HMRC’s performance.

In the tax year 2020–21, 11.5 million self-assessment tax returns were submitted to HMRC.

Illuminating the annual workings of the UK’s tax system, the recorded submission of 11.5 million self-assessment tax returns to HMRC in the 2020-21 tax year offers valuable insight. This figure signifies the sheer scale of individuals and businesses handling their tax obligations independently, navigating the intricacies of the tax code without external assistance. It represents a critical junction where economic activity meets fiscal regulation, dramatically underlining the importance of clear and accessible information from HMRC. Hence, in a digest on HMRC statistics, such a figure stands as a testament to the complexity and might of the UK’s tax system.

HMRC handed £9.2 billion back in overpaid income tax in 2018.

The staggering figure of £9.2 billion reimbursed in overpaid income tax by HMRC in 2018 serves as a prism through which one can examine the intricate workings of the HMRC. This numerical revelation not only underscores the scale of overpayment, but also gives an insight into HMRC’s integrity towards rectifying such errors. It plunges us into meaningful discussions around the efficiency of income collection systems in place, the impact of overpayment on taxpayers’ financial health, and the transparency of the HMRC in addressing such issues. The light it sheds on these areas significantly enriches the discourse within HMRC statistics and its implications on both individuals and society at large.

Around 29 million people paid income tax to HMRC in 2018-2019.

Pivoting our attention to the statistic showcasing that nearly 29 million people paid income tax to HMRC in 2018-2019, it becomes clear that this figure serves as a decisive barometer of the tax landscape in the UK. When placed under the lens of HMRC statistics, it unfurls noteworthy insights about the tax-paying population, contributing to a better understanding of public contributions to government revenue. More than pinpointing the scale of direct tax payments, this fact facilitates a comparison over time, and also stands as a tool to gauge the effectiveness of tax legislation and policy. Therefore, in the analytical arena of HMRC statistics, this is a numeric cornerstone that cannot be overlooked.

In 2018-19, HMRC collected over £50 billion in corporation tax in the UK.

A mammoth figure, such as the £50 billion corporation tax pot collected by HMRC in 2018-19, illustrates HMRC’s pivotal role in the engine room of the UK’s economy. Acting as the fiscal gatekeeper, HMRC’s collections directly fuel government spending on public services – from healthcare to education, to welfare benefits. So this colossal figure not only provides a testament to HMRC’s effectiveness in tax collection but also paints a broad picture of the financial health of the UK’s corporate sector. As such, in the realm of HMRC statistics, this figure stands as an economic lighthouse, guiding users to understanding more against the backdrop of the UK’s economic landscape.

HMRC mailed out nearly 28 million tax codes in 2018/19.

Breathing life into the expansive labyrinth of HMRC operations, the fact that nearly 28 million tax codes were mailed out during 2018/19 dashes a vivid stroke of data onto our statistical tableau. It not only showcases the sheer volume of HMRC’s interface with UK taxpayers, but also signifies the enormity of logistical and administrative efficiency required to maintain such a colossal scale of operation. Tracing the contours of this fact, any discourse on HMRC statistics would be markedly incomplete without touching upon this facet, thereby substantiating the magnitude and breadth of HMRC’s ubiquitous presence in everyday financial dynamics across the country.

HMRC blocked nearly 1 million phishing scam attempts in 2018.

Highlighting ‘HMRC blocked nearly 1 million phishing scam attempts in 2018’ provides a significant insight into the pervasive issue of cybersecurity that HMRC vigilantly addresses. As a central aspect of HMRC’s operational efficiency, these figures underscore the organization’s dedication and proactive actions towards maintaining information integrity and the protection of taxpayers. As such, in a blog post about HMRC statistics, this statistic stands as a testament to the immense scale of cyber challenges that HMRC successfully contends with, illuminating both HMRC’s cybersecurity efforts and the extent of cyber threats in the tax environment.

HMRC collected over £5 billion in inheritance tax in 2019-2020.

Illuminating the scale and scope of activities of HMRC, the fact that over £5 billion was gathered in inheritance tax during 2019-2020 adds a considerable weight to our understanding. This figure not only serves to spotlight the far-reaching impact of inheritance taxation on wealth distribution but also functions as an indicator of HMRC’s proficiency in tax collection. Assessed against this backdrop, the tax narrative reveals a deeper layer of HMRC’s performance metrics for that fiscal year, enhancing our overall perspective on HMRC statistics.

Over 100,000 civil servants from more than 170 industries were trained by HMRC to combat tax evasion in 2020.

In a blog post discussing HMRC statistics, the relevance of the impressive fact that over 100,000 civil servants from more than 170 industries received training from HMRC to combat tax evasion in 2020 talks volumes about the organization’s expansive influence and extensive efforts to counter tax evasion. Additionally, this statistic underlines the breadth and depth of HMRC’s reach across different fields, affirming the body’s indispensability within the structure of the British economy. The sheer number of trained civil servants further highlights the organization’s commitment to increasing proficiency in handling tax-related issues, which is rewarding for both the industry and the economy in general as it helps ensure tax compliance.

The average HMRC employee has been with the department for around 14.41 years.

Illuminating the tenure of the average HMRC employee offers profound insights into the stability and expertise within the department. With an average service duration of approximately 14.41 years, it underlines a valuable degree of continuity and depth of experience within HMRC staff. This longevity tends to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of policies implemented, raising the possibility of advanced institutional knowledge, optimized operations, and greater proficiency when dealing with complex tax rules. Therefore, monitoring this statistic within the sphere of HMRC can serve as a testament to the department’s capability to navigate the intricate landscape of taxation, thus providing reassurance to taxpayers and stakeholders.

In 2017, HMRC rolled out 100 mobile units to reach remote areas for tax investigations.

Highlighting the statistic that HMRC dispatched a fleet of 100 mobile units in 2017 for tax investigations in remote areas underscores the proactive and extensive efforts undertaken by the organization to uphold tax compliance nationwide. HMRC’s initiative not only denotes their commitment to tax equity but also provides insight into how expansive their operations have become. It is indicative of the broader, ongoing strategies implored by authorities to bridge gaps in tax collection and strengthen fiscal governance, making it a crucial piece of information for anybody seeking to understand the workings, impact, and scope of the HMRC.

In 2018, an estimated 415,000 people were underpaid the National Minimum Wage, recovered by HMRC.

This intriguing insight reflects the significance of the National Minimum Wage, as approximated 415,000 people were found underpaid in 2018, with all back payments restored by HMRC. The statistic communicates the active role of HMRC in safeguarding employees’ rights and income, ensuring organisations adhere to legal wage standards. In the domain of HMRC Statistics, it provides a snapshot of the income irregularities and the degree to which government institutions intervene to rectify these disparities. Ultimately, the statistic underscores the broader implications of wage policies, the extent of underpayment, and the effectiveness of HMRC’s monitoring mechanisms in addressing wage issues.

HMRC processed 7.9 million tax rebates for the tax year 2019-2020.

Peeking into the world of HMRC, one discovers that the organization processed an impressive count of 7.9 million tax rebates for the tax year 2019-2020. This figure becomes highly significant, especially in the context of the Hmrc Statistics blog post, presenting a clear image of the vast scale of operations handled by the HMRC. Notably, it underscores the volume of individuals and businesses that overpaid their tax commitments for that fiscal year, evidencing HMRC’s commitment to a fair tax system where any overpayments are dutifully returned. This immense throughput offers a glimpse into the dynamic interaction between taxpayers and the UK government’s tax-collecting body, making it a noteworthy statistic.

VAT accounted for 21% of HMRC’s tax receipts during the fiscal year 2018-19.

In unravelling the labyrinth of HMRC statistics, one finding that plays a central role within the fiscal narrative is the revelation that Value Added Tax (VAT) made up 21% of HMRC’s tax receipts during the fiscal year 2018-19. This measure is not just another piece in the jigsaw of the UK’s financial landscape; instead, it’s a cornerstone, underscoring the significant contribution of VAT to the national tax pool. This piece of data serves as a barometer for comprehending the depth and scope of taxation in the UK, shedding light on consumption patterns and serving as an important index for those analysing the broader economic well-being of the nation. Without this entry portraying the VAT’s prominence, the pageantry of HMRC’s statistical orchestra would be incomplete.

Conclusion

HMRC statistics provide a critical insight into various components of the UK economy, including VAT, corporate tax, income tax, and trade statistics. By analyzing these figures, we can better understand the financial health of the nation and the efficiency of the tax system. These statistics are vital for policy makers, businesses, and researchers alike, representing a crucial tool for decision-making, planning, and forecasting in various economic sectors. Therefore, a thorough and continuous examination of HMRC data is key to driving economic progress and fiscal stability.

References

0. – https://www.www.which.co.uk

1. – https://www.www.independent.co.uk

2. – https://www.taxi-news.co.uk

3. – https://www.www.accountancydaily.co

4. – https://www.fullfact.org

5. – https://www.www.gov.uk

6. – https://www.www.civilserviceworld.com

7. – https://www.www.nao.org.uk

8. – https://www.www.statista.com

9. – https://www.uk.finance.yahoo.com

FAQs

What is HMRC and what is its main function?

HMRC, or Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs, is a government department in the United Kingdom responsible for the collection of taxes, administering certain aspects of the country's national minimum wage legislation, handling national insurance numbers, and ensuring compliance with other financial regulations.

How can someone contact HMRC?

Individuals may contact HMRC through various channels, including via phone, mail, and online, for tax-related enquiries, complaints, or to report fraud. Specific contact information for each service is available on the official government website.

What are different types of taxes collected by HMRC?

HMRC administers several different types of taxes such as Income Tax, Corporation Tax, Capital Gains Tax, Inheritance Tax, VAT (Value-Added Tax), Insurance Premium Tax, and excise duties such as those on alcohol, tobacco and certain energy products.

How does HMRC protect against tax fraud?

HMRC operates a strict policy to ensure tax compliance, this includes investigating suspicious activity, encouraging public reporting of tax evasion, applying penalties where necessary and, in serious cases, prosecuting those who are found guilty of major tax fraud.

Can HMRC provide support for businesses?

Yes, HMRC provides support to businesses in various ways. This includes guidance on tax returns and deadlines, advice on setting up and growing a business, and providing helplines for specific sectors like charities, construction and imports/exports. They also provide an online tool called 'Business Tax Account' to help businesses manage their tax affairs online.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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