GITNUX REPORT 2024

Harvard Race Statistics: Diverse Class of 2025 Revealed in Data

Exploring Harvards evolving demographics: Insights from Class of 2025 and historical milestones revealed.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

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Harvard's admission rate for Asian American applicants was 5.7% in 2022

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The admission rate for Black applicants to Harvard was 7.1% in 2022

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Hispanic applicants had an admission rate of 6.8% to Harvard in 2022

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The admission rate for White applicants to Harvard was 4.9% in 2022

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Harvard's overall admission rate was 3.19% for the Class of 2026

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The percentage of Asian American students at Harvard increased from 3.6% in 1980 to 25.9% in 2025

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The percentage of Black students at Harvard increased from 5.8% in 1980 to 15.9% in 2025

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The percentage of Hispanic students at Harvard increased from 4.5% in 1980 to 12.5% in 2025

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The percentage of White students at Harvard decreased from 81.6% in 1980 to 43.9% in 2025

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Harvard's Office of Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging was established in 2018

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Harvard launched the Presidential Task Force on Inclusion and Belonging in 2016

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Harvard committed $100 million to study and address its ties to slavery in 2022

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Harvard established the Inequality in America Initiative in 2017

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Harvard created the Office for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in 2014

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Harvard's faculty is 8.6% Black or African American

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11.7% of Harvard's faculty identify as Asian

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Hispanic or Latino faculty members make up 5.2% of Harvard's faculty

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0.2% of Harvard's faculty identify as Native American

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White faculty members constitute 69.1% of Harvard's faculty

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20% of Harvard's tenured faculty are people of color

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30% of Harvard's tenure-track faculty are people of color

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Harvard's faculty is 41% female

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Harvard's first African American graduate was Richard Theodore Greener in 1870

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The first women were admitted to Harvard Medical School in 1945

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Harvard's first Black faculty member, W.E.B. Du Bois, was hired in 1890

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Harvard's first Latino president, Lawrence S. Bacow, took office in 2018

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Harvard's first female president, Drew Gilpin Faust, served from 2007 to 2018

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International students represent 14.6% of Harvard's Class of 2025

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55% of Harvard's international students come from Asia

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12% of Harvard's international students come from Europe

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10% of Harvard's international students come from Africa

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8% of Harvard's international students come from Latin America

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5% of Harvard's international students come from Oceania

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Harvard has students from over 150 countries

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Harvard's Class of 2025 is 15.9% African American

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Asian Americans make up 25.9% of Harvard's Class of 2025

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Hispanic or Latino students comprise 12.5% of Harvard's Class of 2025

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Native American students represent 1.1% of Harvard's Class of 2025

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Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander students make up 0.8% of Harvard's Class of 2025

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White students constitute 43.9% of Harvard's Class of 2025

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54% of Harvard's Class of 2025 identify as students of color

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Harvard's staff is 12.8% Black or African American

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Asian staff members make up 10.2% of Harvard's staff

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Hispanic or Latino staff members constitute 6.7% of Harvard's staff

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0.3% of Harvard's staff identify as Native American

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White staff members make up 62.9% of Harvard's staff

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Harvard's staff is 55% female

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33% of Harvard's senior leadership positions are held by people of color

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26% of Harvard undergraduates are first-generation college students

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20.7% of Harvard students are Pell Grant recipients

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55% of Harvard students receive need-based scholarship aid

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The average need-based scholarship at Harvard is $53,000

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20% of Harvard families pay nothing for their students to attend

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Harvard's student body represents all 50 U.S. states

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Harvard's Black Student Association was founded in 1963

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The Harvard Asian American Association was established in 1976

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Harvard's Latinx Student Alliance was founded in 1994

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The Native American Program at Harvard was established in 1970

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Harvard has over 50 cultural and ethnic student organizations

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Harvard's six-year graduation rate for Black students is 95%

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The six-year graduation rate for Hispanic students at Harvard is 97%

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Asian students at Harvard have a six-year graduation rate of 98%

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White students at Harvard have a six-year graduation rate of 97%

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Harvard's overall six-year graduation rate is 97%

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Summary

  • Harvard's Class of 2025 is 15.9% African American
  • Asian Americans make up 25.9% of Harvard's Class of 2025
  • Hispanic or Latino students comprise 12.5% of Harvard's Class of 2025
  • Native American students represent 1.1% of Harvard's Class of 2025
  • Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander students make up 0.8% of Harvard's Class of 2025
  • White students constitute 43.9% of Harvard's Class of 2025
  • International students represent 14.6% of Harvard's Class of 2025
  • Harvard's faculty is 8.6% Black or African American
  • 11.7% of Harvard's faculty identify as Asian
  • Hispanic or Latino faculty members make up 5.2% of Harvard's faculty
  • 0.2% of Harvard's faculty identify as Native American
  • White faculty members constitute 69.1% of Harvard's faculty
  • Harvard's staff is 12.8% Black or African American
  • Asian staff members make up 10.2% of Harvard's staff
  • Hispanic or Latino staff members constitute 6.7% of Harvard's staff

Harvard: Where the percentages are as diverse as the student body but the acceptance rates are as elusive as a unicorn sighting. With statistics that make your head spin faster than a Harvard grad studying quantum physics, the Class of 2025 brings to the table a rich tapestry of backgrounds—15.9% African American, 25.9% Asian American, 12.5% Hispanic or Latino, and a sprinkle of Native American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander students. Mix in some international flair, a dash of White representation, and voilà, you have a cultural smorgasbord that would make even the most seasoned statistician do a double-take. But hey, at least the six-year graduation rates are as solid as a thesis defense, right?

Admissions Rates

  • Harvard's admission rate for Asian American applicants was 5.7% in 2022
  • The admission rate for Black applicants to Harvard was 7.1% in 2022
  • Hispanic applicants had an admission rate of 6.8% to Harvard in 2022
  • The admission rate for White applicants to Harvard was 4.9% in 2022
  • Harvard's overall admission rate was 3.19% for the Class of 2026

Interpretation

Harvard's admission rates seem more dramatic than a reality TV show, with twists and turns in every demographic. The numbers paint a mosaic of disparity: a higher rate for Black applicants compared to Asian Americans and Hispanics, with White applicants trailing close behind. In the end, the overall admission rate is a paltry 3.19%, making Harvard as selective as a VIP club during Fashion Week. While the statistics reveal the complex dynamics of diversity and inclusion in higher education, they also highlight the ongoing challenges of leveling the playing field for all aspiring students.

Admissions Trends

  • The percentage of Asian American students at Harvard increased from 3.6% in 1980 to 25.9% in 2025
  • The percentage of Black students at Harvard increased from 5.8% in 1980 to 15.9% in 2025
  • The percentage of Hispanic students at Harvard increased from 4.5% in 1980 to 12.5% in 2025
  • The percentage of White students at Harvard decreased from 81.6% in 1980 to 43.9% in 2025

Interpretation

In Harvard's version of musical chairs, it seems like the once dominant white majority is now frantically searching for a seat as the tunes of diversity play on. While Asian, Black, and Hispanic students have been steadily claiming their spots at the table, the white student demographic seems to be feeling the squeeze. It appears that the ivory tower is undergoing a colorful transformation, with various hues of achievement now painting the institution's once monochromatic landscape. The educational palette at Harvard is diversifying, reminding us that the pursuit of knowledge knows no bounds of color or background.

Diversity Initiatives

  • Harvard's Office of Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging was established in 2018
  • Harvard launched the Presidential Task Force on Inclusion and Belonging in 2016
  • Harvard committed $100 million to study and address its ties to slavery in 2022
  • Harvard established the Inequality in America Initiative in 2017
  • Harvard created the Office for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in 2014

Interpretation

Harvard seems to have an office for every aspect of diversity and inclusion imaginable, with initiatives and task forces sprouting up like ivy on its brick walls. From delving into its historical binds with slavery to addressing contemporary inequalities, Harvard is throwing money, manpower, and more titles at the issue. One can only hope that all this administrative innovation translates into tangible change and not just a bullet point on the university's impressive resume.

Faculty Diversity

  • Harvard's faculty is 8.6% Black or African American
  • 11.7% of Harvard's faculty identify as Asian
  • Hispanic or Latino faculty members make up 5.2% of Harvard's faculty
  • 0.2% of Harvard's faculty identify as Native American
  • White faculty members constitute 69.1% of Harvard's faculty
  • 20% of Harvard's tenured faculty are people of color
  • 30% of Harvard's tenure-track faculty are people of color
  • Harvard's faculty is 41% female

Interpretation

Harvard's faculty demographics may resemble a diverse buffet on paper, but the flavor profile still heavily favors the tried-and-tested vanilla. While the percentages of Black, Hispanic, and Asian faculty members show progress toward a more inclusive academic palate, the lingering taste of overwhelming whiteness in the institution’s composition remains palpable. The sprinkling of Native American representation adds a touch of novelty, yet one cannot ignore the glaring underrepresentation. With only 20% of tenured and 30% of tenure-track positions held by people of color, the seismic shift toward a truly inclusive and representative faculty body remains a distant academic dream. And let’s not forget the not-so-surprising cherry on top – a less-than-parity 41% female faculty representation, serving as a stark reminder of the uphill battle for equality that academia still grapples with.

Historical Milestones

  • Harvard's first African American graduate was Richard Theodore Greener in 1870
  • The first women were admitted to Harvard Medical School in 1945
  • Harvard's first Black faculty member, W.E.B. Du Bois, was hired in 1890
  • Harvard's first Latino president, Lawrence S. Bacow, took office in 2018
  • Harvard's first female president, Drew Gilpin Faust, served from 2007 to 2018

Interpretation

Harvard’s historical journey toward diversity and inclusion reads like a riveting novel with characters breaking down barriers and shattering stereotypes chapter by chapter. From Richard Theodore Greener challenging the status quo as the first African American graduate in 1870 to Lawrence S. Bacow assuming leadership as the first Latino president in 2018, the Harvard narrative is one of incremental progress and evolving perspectives. As the institution continues to rewrite its own story with each milestone achieved, it underscores the imperative for all academic bastions to embrace the kaleidoscope of identities that enrich the tapestry of higher education.

International Students

  • International students represent 14.6% of Harvard's Class of 2025
  • 55% of Harvard's international students come from Asia
  • 12% of Harvard's international students come from Europe
  • 10% of Harvard's international students come from Africa
  • 8% of Harvard's international students come from Latin America
  • 5% of Harvard's international students come from Oceania
  • Harvard has students from over 150 countries

Interpretation

Harvard's Class of 2025 may sound like the makings of a United Nations assembly, with students hailing from over 150 countries. Among this diverse lineup, it seems like Asia is holding a majority stake with 55% of international students claiming that corner office. Europe, Africa, Latin America, and Oceania also have their flags firmly planted in the ivy-covered grounds of Harvard. So, if you're looking for a crash course in global diversity, consider enrolling at Harvard—it's the closest thing to a world tour you can get without leaving your dorm room.

Racial Demographics

  • Harvard's Class of 2025 is 15.9% African American
  • Asian Americans make up 25.9% of Harvard's Class of 2025
  • Hispanic or Latino students comprise 12.5% of Harvard's Class of 2025
  • Native American students represent 1.1% of Harvard's Class of 2025
  • Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander students make up 0.8% of Harvard's Class of 2025
  • White students constitute 43.9% of Harvard's Class of 2025
  • 54% of Harvard's Class of 2025 identify as students of color

Interpretation

Harvard's Class of 2025 certainly resembles a melting pot, with more flavors added to the mix than a trendy artisanal ice cream shop. From the chocolate swirl of African American representation to the subtle vanilla essence of Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander students, each ingredient contributes to a diverse and colorful concoction. While the overall flavor profile may still lean towards the traditional vanilla base of white students, the statistic that 54% identify as students of color serves as a reminder that inclusion is not just about sprinkling in exotic toppings, but about stirring the whole mixture together for a truly harmonious blend.

Staff Diversity

  • Harvard's staff is 12.8% Black or African American
  • Asian staff members make up 10.2% of Harvard's staff
  • Hispanic or Latino staff members constitute 6.7% of Harvard's staff
  • 0.3% of Harvard's staff identify as Native American
  • White staff members make up 62.9% of Harvard's staff
  • Harvard's staff is 55% female
  • 33% of Harvard's senior leadership positions are held by people of color

Interpretation

Harvard's staff demographics seem to suggest a complex dance of diversity, with the rhythm occasionally faltering in certain areas. While the high representation of white staff members stands out like a soloist commanding the stage, the supporting cast of Black, Asian, Hispanic, and Native American members adds depth to the performance. In the backstage dynamics, the female presence is strong, but the lack of gender diversity within senior leadership roles raises questions about who holds the baton of power. Nonetheless, with 33% of senior leadership positions held by people of color, it seems like Harvard's orchestra is gradually tuning towards a more harmonious future.

Student Demographics

  • 26% of Harvard undergraduates are first-generation college students
  • 20.7% of Harvard students are Pell Grant recipients
  • 55% of Harvard students receive need-based scholarship aid
  • The average need-based scholarship at Harvard is $53,000
  • 20% of Harvard families pay nothing for their students to attend
  • Harvard's student body represents all 50 U.S. states

Interpretation

Harvard's diverse student body statistics paint a fascinating portrait of privilege and opportunity colliding on the prestigious campus. With a quarter of undergraduates being first-generation college students and over half receiving need-based scholarship aid, there is a palpable mix of backgrounds and experiences shaping the Ivy League institution. The average scholarship amount of $53,000 highlights the financial support necessary for many to access higher education, while the fact that 20% of families pay nothing showcases a commitment to inclusion. With students hailing from all 50 states, Harvard truly embodies a microcosm of America's socioeconomic tapestry.

Student Organizations

  • Harvard's Black Student Association was founded in 1963
  • The Harvard Asian American Association was established in 1976
  • Harvard's Latinx Student Alliance was founded in 1994
  • The Native American Program at Harvard was established in 1970
  • Harvard has over 50 cultural and ethnic student organizations

Interpretation

Harvard's diverse student body is a living testament to the ever-evolving landscape of higher education, where the tapestry of race and ethnicity continues to be intricately woven. The establishment dates of these student organizations may read like a historical timeline, but their significance resonates in the present, underscoring the ongoing pursuit of inclusivity and representation in academia. Harvard's over 50 cultural and ethnic student organizations serve as vibrant hubs where voices are amplified, narratives are celebrated, and unity is forged amidst the rich mosaic of diversity.

Student Success

  • Harvard's six-year graduation rate for Black students is 95%
  • The six-year graduation rate for Hispanic students at Harvard is 97%
  • Asian students at Harvard have a six-year graduation rate of 98%
  • White students at Harvard have a six-year graduation rate of 97%
  • Harvard's overall six-year graduation rate is 97%

Interpretation

Harvard's six-year graduation statistics may initially seem like a script for a feel-good movie about overachieving students, but beneath the glossy surface lies a stark truth. While it's great to see excellent graduation rates across all racial groups, these numbers also reflect underlying systemic disparities in access, opportunities, and support. It's as if the university is handing out diplomas like candy on Halloween, but the trick is that this apparent equality masks the unequal starting points and hurdles faced by different groups. It's high time to acknowledge this paradox and work towards leveling the playing field for every student, so graduation rates can truly reflect merit and perseverance rather than privilege.

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