GITNUX REPORT 2024

Female Participation In Sport Statistics: Womens Sports Receive Mere 4% Coverage

Breaking Through Barriers: The staggering disparity of female representation across sports media and industry.

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

Statistic 1

In the US, 40% of women aged 18-24 participate in sports and exercise activities

Statistic 2

In the UK, 63% of men are active in sports compared to 58% of women

Statistic 3

In Australia, 59.9% of women participate in sport and physical recreation compared to 65% of men

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In Canada, 16% of adult women are involved in sport, compared to 35% of men

Statistic 5

In the EU, 36% of women exercise or play sport at least once a week compared to 44% of men

Statistic 6

In New Zealand, 72% of women participate in sport and active recreation weekly, compared to 74% of men

Statistic 7

In South Africa, only 11.2% of women participate in sport compared to 19.8% of men

Statistic 8

In India, only 29% of women participate in sports compared to 42% of men

Statistic 9

In Japan, 27.8% of adult women participate in sports at least once a week, compared to 37.9% of men

Statistic 10

Women make up 41% of participants in NCAA sports

Statistic 11

In US colleges, women's teams receive only 33% of total athletic operating budgets

Statistic 12

Only 24% of NCAA Division I athletic directors are women

Statistic 13

In the US, women receive 44% of athletic scholarship dollars at NCAA member institutions

Statistic 14

Only 7% of NCAA Division I women's teams have a female athletic director

Statistic 15

In NCAA Division I, women's teams receive only 29% of total recruiting dollars

Statistic 16

Women make up 44% of NCAA Championship participants

Statistic 17

Women's sports receive only 0.4% of total sports sponsorship

Statistic 18

In the US, male athletes receive $179 million more in athletic scholarships than female athletes

Statistic 19

Only 7% of total sports marketing deals are for female athletes

Statistic 20

The prize money gap between men's and women's professional golf tours is 83%

Statistic 21

In tennis, the prize money gap between men and women at grand slam events was closed in 2007

Statistic 22

The US women's national soccer team earns 89% of what the men's team earns

Statistic 23

In the UK, the average sponsorship deal for a female athlete is £5,000, compared to £50,000 for male athletes

Statistic 24

The FIFA Women's World Cup 2019 prize money was $30 million, compared to $400 million for the men's 2018 World Cup

Statistic 25

In Australia, women's sports receive only 7% of total sports coverage

Statistic 26

In the US, only 40% of coaches for women's collegiate teams are women

Statistic 27

Globally, women make up only 18% of all sport board members

Statistic 28

In the UK, only 4% of sports governing bodies have a female CEO

Statistic 29

Only 22% of all coaches in the UK are women

Statistic 30

In international sports federations, only 18% of board members are women

Statistic 31

As of 2020, only 10% of International Olympic Committee members are women

Statistic 32

In the US, women hold only 23% of athletic director positions in collegiate sports

Statistic 33

Only 30% of qualified sports coaches in Australia are women

Statistic 34

In Canada, only 34% of head coaches in university sports are women

Statistic 35

Only 4% of sports media coverage is dedicated to women's sports

Statistic 36

40% of sportspeople are women, but only 4% of sports media coverage is dedicated to women's sports

Statistic 37

In 2019, only 4% of the top 100 broadcasters' sports coverage featured women's sports

Statistic 38

Only 3% of print sports coverage is dedicated to women's sports

Statistic 39

Only 12% of sports news is presented by women

Statistic 40

In the US, 40% of sportspeople are women, but only 4% of sports media coverage is dedicated to women's sports

Statistic 41

Only 5% of sports media content is produced by women

Statistic 42

In 2021, women's sports received only 5.4% of all sports media coverage

Statistic 43

As of 2022, only 14% of all sports journalists in the UK are women

Statistic 44

In the 2016 Rio Olympics, 45% of participants were women

Statistic 45

In the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, 48.8% of participants were women

Statistic 46

The 2024 Paris Olympics aims to have 50% female participation

Statistic 47

At the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, 41% of participants were women

Statistic 48

The 1900 Paris Olympics was the first to include women, with 22 female athletes (2.2% of all athletes)

Statistic 49

In the 2012 London Olympics, women competed in every sport for the first time

Statistic 50

At the 2021 Tokyo Paralympics, 40.5% of athletes were women

Statistic 51

Only 3% of total sports media coverage in the US is dedicated to women's sports

Statistic 52

As of 2019, only 7% of total sports coverage in the UK focused on women's sports

Statistic 53

The average salary in the WNBA is $75,181, compared to $7.7 million in the NBA

Statistic 54

Only 0.4% of total commercial investment in sports goes into women's sports

Statistic 55

In professional soccer, the US Women's National Team has won four World Cup titles, while the Men's team has won none

Statistic 56

The viewership for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup final was 22% higher than for the 2018 men's final

Statistic 57

As of 2021, only 13 out of 30 WNBA teams are profitable

Statistic 58

In the US, high school girls' participation in sports has increased by 990% since Title IX was passed in 1972

Statistic 59

As of 2019, 3.4 million girls participate in high school sports in the US

Statistic 60

In the UK, only 8% of girls aged 11-18 meet the recommended daily amount of physical activity

Statistic 61

In the US, by age 14, girls drop out of sports at twice the rate of boys

Statistic 62

In the UK, 43% of girls aged 11-16 disengage from sport after primary school

Statistic 63

In Australia, girls aged 15-17 spend 39 minutes less per day on physical activity than boys the same age

Statistic 64

In Canada, only 59% of girls aged 3-17 participate in sports, compared to 70% of boys

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Summary

  • Only 4% of sports media coverage is dedicated to women's sports
  • 40% of sportspeople are women, but only 4% of sports media coverage is dedicated to women's sports
  • In 2019, only 4% of the top 100 broadcasters' sports coverage featured women's sports
  • Only 3% of print sports coverage is dedicated to women's sports
  • Only 12% of sports news is presented by women
  • In the US, 40% of sportspeople are women, but only 4% of sports media coverage is dedicated to women's sports
  • Only 5% of sports media content is produced by women
  • In 2021, women's sports received only 5.4% of all sports media coverage
  • As of 2022, only 14% of all sports journalists in the UK are women
  • In the 2016 Rio Olympics, 45% of participants were women
  • In the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, 48.8% of participants were women
  • The 2024 Paris Olympics aims to have 50% female participation
  • At the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, 41% of participants were women
  • The 1900 Paris Olympics was the first to include women, with 22 female athletes (2.2% of all athletes)
  • In the 2012 London Olympics, women competed in every sport for the first time

With statistics revealing that only 4% of sports media coverage is dedicated to womens sports despite women constituting 40% of sportspeople, it seems like the world of sports still has some serious catching up to do when it comes to gender equality on the playing field and in the media limelight. Its a bit like having a front-row seat to a game where one team is dominating the field while being treated like the invisible players on the bench! Lets dive into the fascinating world of female participation in sport – where the stats are eye-opening and the victories are worth celebrating.

Adult Participation

  • In the US, 40% of women aged 18-24 participate in sports and exercise activities
  • In the UK, 63% of men are active in sports compared to 58% of women
  • In Australia, 59.9% of women participate in sport and physical recreation compared to 65% of men
  • In Canada, 16% of adult women are involved in sport, compared to 35% of men
  • In the EU, 36% of women exercise or play sport at least once a week compared to 44% of men
  • In New Zealand, 72% of women participate in sport and active recreation weekly, compared to 74% of men
  • In South Africa, only 11.2% of women participate in sport compared to 19.8% of men
  • In India, only 29% of women participate in sports compared to 42% of men
  • In Japan, 27.8% of adult women participate in sports at least once a week, compared to 37.9% of men

Interpretation

The global scoreboard on female participation in sports seems to resemble a nail-biting game of statistical tug-of-war, with women at times leading the charge and at others lagging behind. From the USA to Japan, the numbers paint a complex picture of gender dynamics in sports and exercise. While some countries show promising levels of female engagement, others clearly have some catching up to do. It's clear that the playing field is not quite level yet, but with each new statistic, it's as if women are stepping up to the challenge, determined to rewrite the scorecard and claim their place in the sports arena.

Collegiate Sports

  • Women make up 41% of participants in NCAA sports
  • In US colleges, women's teams receive only 33% of total athletic operating budgets
  • Only 24% of NCAA Division I athletic directors are women
  • In the US, women receive 44% of athletic scholarship dollars at NCAA member institutions
  • Only 7% of NCAA Division I women's teams have a female athletic director
  • In NCAA Division I, women's teams receive only 29% of total recruiting dollars
  • Women make up 44% of NCAA Championship participants

Interpretation

These statistics paint a complex portrait of female participation in sports, showcasing both progress and persistent challenges. While women make up a significant portion of NCAA athletes and championship participants, the disparities in funding and leadership opportunities are glaring. It seems women are excelling on the field, but facing barriers off it. In a world where representation and resources are key to equality, perhaps it's time for the sports industry to level the playing field in more ways than one.

Funding and Sponsorship

  • Women's sports receive only 0.4% of total sports sponsorship
  • In the US, male athletes receive $179 million more in athletic scholarships than female athletes
  • Only 7% of total sports marketing deals are for female athletes
  • The prize money gap between men's and women's professional golf tours is 83%
  • In tennis, the prize money gap between men and women at grand slam events was closed in 2007
  • The US women's national soccer team earns 89% of what the men's team earns
  • In the UK, the average sponsorship deal for a female athlete is £5,000, compared to £50,000 for male athletes
  • The FIFA Women's World Cup 2019 prize money was $30 million, compared to $400 million for the men's 2018 World Cup
  • In Australia, women's sports receive only 7% of total sports coverage

Interpretation

In a world where female athletes continuously push boundaries and break records, the numbers reveal a stark reality - a reality where sponsorship dollars seem to have a severe case of tunnel vision, athletic scholarships still have a gender bias, marketing deals cling to outdated norms, and prize money gaps resemble a canyon rather than a crack. It's like watching a thrilling sports match with one eye closed - you can still appreciate the skill and determination, but you're missing out on the full experience. It's apparent that there's work to be done in leveling the playing field, both literally and figuratively, because when it comes to sports, it's time to show that equality is more than just a game.

Leadership and Coaching

  • In the US, only 40% of coaches for women's collegiate teams are women
  • Globally, women make up only 18% of all sport board members
  • In the UK, only 4% of sports governing bodies have a female CEO
  • Only 22% of all coaches in the UK are women
  • In international sports federations, only 18% of board members are women
  • As of 2020, only 10% of International Olympic Committee members are women
  • In the US, women hold only 23% of athletic director positions in collegiate sports
  • Only 30% of qualified sports coaches in Australia are women
  • In Canada, only 34% of head coaches in university sports are women

Interpretation

In a world where women have shattered glass ceilings in various fields, the statistics on female participation in sports leadership roles paint a glaring picture of inequality that cannot be ignored. From the lack of female coaches in collegiate teams to the paltry representation of women on sport boards and in executive positions, the numbers reveal a systemic issue that must be addressed. It's time to level the playing field and give women the opportunities they deserve to lead and excel in the world of sports. After all, when it comes to scoring points for equality, there should be no gender bias on the scoreboard.

Media Coverage

  • Only 4% of sports media coverage is dedicated to women's sports
  • 40% of sportspeople are women, but only 4% of sports media coverage is dedicated to women's sports
  • In 2019, only 4% of the top 100 broadcasters' sports coverage featured women's sports
  • Only 3% of print sports coverage is dedicated to women's sports
  • Only 12% of sports news is presented by women
  • In the US, 40% of sportspeople are women, but only 4% of sports media coverage is dedicated to women's sports
  • Only 5% of sports media content is produced by women
  • In 2021, women's sports received only 5.4% of all sports media coverage
  • As of 2022, only 14% of all sports journalists in the UK are women

Interpretation

These statistics might suggest that the sports media is currently operating on the highly esteemed "4% rule" when it comes to coverage of women's sports – a percentage so exclusive, it might as well be a VIP section at a nightclub. But jokes aside, these numbers reveal a deeply entrenched gender disparity in sports media that needs urgent attention and a serious revamp. It's time to smash that glass ceiling faster than a world record sprint and give female athletes the recognition and visibility they deserve. It's not just about leveling the playing field; it's about rewriting the whole damn script.

Olympic Participation

  • In the 2016 Rio Olympics, 45% of participants were women
  • In the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, 48.8% of participants were women
  • The 2024 Paris Olympics aims to have 50% female participation
  • At the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, 41% of participants were women
  • The 1900 Paris Olympics was the first to include women, with 22 female athletes (2.2% of all athletes)
  • In the 2012 London Olympics, women competed in every sport for the first time
  • At the 2021 Tokyo Paralympics, 40.5% of athletes were women

Interpretation

The evolution of female participation in sporting events is not just a numbers game—it's a reflection of the progress in gender equality and empowerment. From the symbolic breakthrough of the 1900 Paris Olympics to the ambitious target set for the upcoming 2024 Paris Olympics, the journey of women in sports is a testament to their resilience and determination to break barriers. As women continue to excel and thrive in all sporting disciplines, the numbers speak for themselves, showing that the playing field is slowly but surely becoming more balanced. The Tokyo Paralympics also highlight the inclusivity and diversity in sports, where women athletes are shining just as brightly as their male counterparts. The road to achieving true gender equality in sports may be long, but with each competition, women are proving that they are a force to be reckoned with, both on and off the field.

Professional Sports

  • Only 3% of total sports media coverage in the US is dedicated to women's sports
  • As of 2019, only 7% of total sports coverage in the UK focused on women's sports
  • The average salary in the WNBA is $75,181, compared to $7.7 million in the NBA
  • Only 0.4% of total commercial investment in sports goes into women's sports
  • In professional soccer, the US Women's National Team has won four World Cup titles, while the Men's team has won none
  • The viewership for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup final was 22% higher than for the 2018 men's final
  • As of 2021, only 13 out of 30 WNBA teams are profitable

Interpretation

As these statistics show, the playing field in the world of sports is not always level when it comes to gender equality. From the stark difference in media coverage to the significant wage gap between male and female athletes, it is clear that there is still much work to be done. Despite the undeniable talent and success of female athletes, their achievements are often overshadowed by the glitz and glamour of their male counterparts. It's time for society to recognize and support women in sports, not just for the sake of fairness, but also for the sheer joy and inspiration that their athleticism brings to fans around the world.

Youth Participation

  • In the US, high school girls' participation in sports has increased by 990% since Title IX was passed in 1972
  • As of 2019, 3.4 million girls participate in high school sports in the US
  • In the UK, only 8% of girls aged 11-18 meet the recommended daily amount of physical activity
  • In the US, by age 14, girls drop out of sports at twice the rate of boys
  • In the UK, 43% of girls aged 11-16 disengage from sport after primary school
  • In Australia, girls aged 15-17 spend 39 minutes less per day on physical activity than boys the same age
  • In Canada, only 59% of girls aged 3-17 participate in sports, compared to 70% of boys

Interpretation

While the US celebrates the remarkable 990% increase in high school girls' participation in sports since the passing of Title IX in 1972, the UK seems trapped in a sluggish game of catch-up with only 8% of girls meeting daily physical activity recommendations. As girls across different countries navigate the playing field, the numbers reveal a pattern of dropouts and disengagement, with girls in the US and UK leaving sports at alarming rates compared to boys. In this global snapshot of female participation in sport, it becomes evident that bridging the gender gap in physical activity remains an uphill challenge. Perhaps it's time to rewrite the rules and level the playing field for all.

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