GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Eoir Asylum Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Eoir Asylum Statistics

  • In 2020, EOIR received 183,134 new asylum cases.
  • The number of immigration proceedings, which includes EOIR asylum cases, went down from 348,713 in 2019 to 312,361 in 2020.
  • As of September 2020, 40% of all immigration court decisions granted asylum, withholding of removal, or relief under the Convention Against Torture at the behest of EOIR.
  • The average case processing time for EOIR asylum cases in 2020 was just over 700 days.
  • In 2020, the proportion of cases granted asylum in the immigration court out of total EOIR asylum cases was 34.5%.
  • As of 2020, the average rate of denial for affirmative asylum is 65% across twelve selected immigration courts.
  • The median duration of an immigration case, including asylum, EOIR cases, was 681 days in 2017.
  • As of 2019, there were more than 392,906 pending immigration cases, including EOIR asylum cases, in United States.
  • Judges at the San Francisco Immigration Court denied 85.81% of asylum cases in 2020.
  • Of the EOIR asylum cases, China had the highest number of asylum seekers in U.S. immigration court with 50,820, followed by El Salvador with 50,345 people as of February 2021.
  • Asylum seekers from Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador received negative outcomes at rates above 80 percent in most courts as of 2020.
  • In 2016, asylum seekers represented by an attorney were five times more likely to win their case compared to those without representation.
  • In 2020, the Arlington Immigration Court in Virginia had a 63.8% asylum grant rate.
  • In 2017, the median of days to decide an affirmative asylum application was 180 days.
  • There were 44,271 new EOIR asylum cases nationwide in 2010.
  • The New York Immigration Court had the highest level of representation, with 85% of represented cases in 2016.
  • In 2020, Mexican nationals had an asylum denial rate of 85.7%.
  • 67.6% individuals seeking asylum in Chicago Immigration Court were denied in 2020.
  • In 2020, Miami Immigration Court denied 82.6% of asylum cases.
  • In 2017, EOIR reported a record high of 61,094 defensive asylum applications.

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The intricacy of immigration and asylum policies globally manifests prominently through statistical data. This blog post sheds light upon EOIR (Executive Office for Immigration Review) Asylum Statistics- a comprehensive reflection of the trends, processes, decisions, and outcomes specific to asylum seekers in the United States. Understood properly, these statistics can provide invaluable insights into policy impact, regional variations, and the broader sociopolitical implications intertwined with asylum proceedings. Our analysis aims to facilitate a better grasp of these critical data points, and prompt informed discussions around immigration policy and its far-reaching effects.

The Latest Eoir Asylum Statistics Unveiled

In 2020, EOIR received 183,134 new asylum cases.

Weaving the figure ‘In 2020, EOIR received 183,134 new asylum cases’ into the tapestry of EOIR Asylum Statistics reveals a vibrant illustration of the escalating dynamics and pressures within the U.S. immigration landscape. This striking number offers a benchmark for understanding the scope of individuals seeking refuge, underlining the complexities EOIR faces while processing these cases. In an era characterized by geopolitical upheaval, conflict, and socio-economic challenges, this statistic paints a poignant picture of the gravity of need, the labyrinthine nature of asylum procedures, and emphasizes the critical role EOIR plays in safeguarding human rights and international law.

The number of immigration proceedings, which includes EOIR asylum cases, went down from 348,713 in 2019 to 312,361 in 2020.

Delving into the arena of EOIR (Executive Office for Immigration Review) asylum statistics, the mentioned data manifests noteworthy fluctuations within the immigration proceedings over a span of a year. The dwindling numbers, descending from 348,713 in 2019 to 312,361 in 2020, reflect the changing dynamics of the immigration landscape. For the keen observer, this decrease may flag potential shifts in the government policies, implementation of sterner or softer immigration laws, or even broader sociopolitical or economic influences that could have incited fewer people to seek asylum. Consequently, this numerical insight fortifies the blog post by providing palpable evidence of shifting trends in EOIR asylum cases, grounds for policy appreciation, or criticism and enhance the reader’s holistic understanding.

As of September 2020, 40% of all immigration court decisions granted asylum, withholding of removal, or relief under the Convention Against Torture at the behest of EOIR.

The ‘September 2020 Asylum Statistics’ adds a significant touch to our discussion about EOIR Asylum Statistics sustaining a crucial panorama of migration patterns and court verdicts. With 40% leading to asylum, withholding of removal, or relief under the Convention Against Torture, it provides a dramatic commentary on the sweeping effect the EOIR has on the lives and futures of those seeking refuge. It isn’t just a numeric measure but a thermometer that takes the temperature of immigration policy, bearing witness to the trends, shifts and the overarching narrative of protection granted at a given time period.

The average case processing time for EOIR asylum cases in 2020 was just over 700 days.

Diving into the landscape of EOIR asylum cases, the striking statistic of an average case processing time exceeding 700 days in 2020 uncovers a complex narrative. It paints a picture of a system under strain, underscored by delays and backlog, effectively shifting the asylum seekers’ lives into lengthy periods of uncertainty and limbo. This number not only quantifies their struggles but also measures the efficiency and effectiveness of the immigration system. It sheds light on the deep-seated logistical issues that warrant urgent attention, contributing to a comprehensive understanding of the asylum situation from multiple perspectives. Being equipped with such information empowers stakeholders in the asylum process to foster systemic improvements, promising a more efficient legal process and a more humane treatment of asylum seekers.

In 2020, the proportion of cases granted asylum in the immigration court out of total EOIR asylum cases was 34.5%.

Drawing attention to the statistical evidence that in 2020, the proportion of cases granted asylum in immigration court out of total EOIR asylum cases was 34.5%, underscores critical insights into the dynamics of immigration jurisprudence. This figure becomes particularly salient when considering the role and implications of EOIR asylum proceedings. The percentage manifests not just a numerical count, but reflects an essential facet of humanitarian relief and international protection offered in the United States. This figure also prompts deeper reflection and examination of policy decisions, judicial practices, and their potential impacts on the lives of asylum claimants, making it an integral part of any thorough discourse about EOIR Asylum Statistics.

As of 2020, the average rate of denial for affirmative asylum is 65% across twelve selected immigration courts.

In exploring EOIR Asylum statistics, we find a pivotal datum that imparts a sobering narrative. As of 2020, seminal immigration courts render an unsettling 65% denial rate for affirmative asylum cases. This statistic doesn’t just exist as a figure in a spreadsheet, rather it quantifies the stark chances faced by individuals seeking respite on American soil. Therefore, it serves as an integral cornerstone in the understanding and discussion of current immigration practices, and underscores the gravity of the asylum seekers’ plight, thereby influencing policy debates, legal frameworks, and humanitarian considerations about this pressing issue.

The median duration of an immigration case, including asylum, EOIR cases, was 681 days in 2017.

Serving as a critical measuring stick in the blog post about EOIR Asylum Statistics, the statistic ‘ The median duration of an immigration case, including asylum, EOIR cases, was 681 days in 2017’ casts a spotlight on the pressing issues faced in the immigration cycle. It stands as a stark indicator of the lengthy, often complex process asylum seekers and EOIR cases undergo before a final decision is reached. Such a protracted timeframe can lead to situations of uncertainty and stress for the applicants, influencing their overall well-being and assimilation into society. Therefore, this statistical evidence provides a basis for discussion on the need for enhanced and expedited immigration systems in response to the chronic delays underscored by the 681-day average.

As of 2019, there were more than 392,906 pending immigration cases, including EOIR asylum cases, in United States.

Highlighting an astonishing total of over 392,906 pending immigration cases in the United States as of 2019, inclusive of EOIR asylum applications, provides a striking insight into the volume, complexity and potential human impact of the U.S. immigration process. This formidable backlog not only underscores the enormity of the challenge faced by the EOIR and the difficulties encountered by immigrants in navigating the asylum seeking process, but it also reflects broader issues of immigration policy and administrative efficiency. In the context of an EOIR Asylum Statistics blog post, this data is a beacon, illuminating the stark realities of a system in dire need of review and reform.

Judges at the San Francisco Immigration Court denied 85.81% of asylum cases in 2020.

Unraveling the implications of the data, the rejection of 85.81% of asylum cases by the San Francisco Immigration Court in 2020 provides a compelling reflection of the immigration dynamics within the due process. This figure operates as a mirror, revealing not just an individual percentage, but spotlighting trajectories surrounding EOIR Asylum Statistics. It throws into sharp relief, the ebb and flow of asylum acceptances and rejections over a span of time, thereby providing a framework for understanding patterns that might otherwise lay concealed beneath the surface of broader immigration trends. Smashingly, it strengthens the comprehension of the immigration climate and influences policy discourse, while providing a robust foundation for discussions on the credibility, success, and challenges under EOIR adjudication.

Of the EOIR asylum cases, China had the highest number of asylum seekers in U.S. immigration court with 50,820, followed by El Salvador with 50,345 people as of February 2021.

Highlighting the number of EOIR asylum seekers from various countries is instrumental in shedding light on the global migration patterns, particularly to the U.S. In our recent review, China emerged with the highest tally at 50,820, closely followed by El Salvador with 50,345 as of February 2021. These figures not only reflect the socio-political challenges in the origin countries leading to such asylum-seeking spikes, but they also underline the magnitude of the task at hand for U.S. immigration courts. Such data, therefore, is vital in shaping effective immigration policies and informing discourse on international relations and human rights issues.

Asylum seekers from Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador received negative outcomes at rates above 80 percent in most courts as of 2020.

Drawing on the rich tapestry of intricate data within EOIR Asylum statistics, the statistic depicting over 80% negative outcomes for asylum seekers from Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador punctuates a critical narrative. It carves a stark picture of the monumental challenges faced in these courts, illuminating the precarious fate of those seeking sanctuary from Central American nations. This statistic reinforces the narrative gravity, ensuring readers grasp the depth of the disparities within the U.S. asylum system while encouraging deeper discourse on the bottlenecks, systemic factors, and potential reforms necessary for the pursuit of a fairer asylum adjudication process.

In 2016, asylum seekers represented by an attorney were five times more likely to win their case compared to those without representation.

The potency of legal representation in the arena of asylum seeking is vividly reflected in the 2016 statistics, which lays bare the momentous difference in case winnings between those with and without legal guidance. The statistic suggests a deep-rooted systemic leaning towards those well-versed legally, and underlines the critical nature of having an attorney by one’s side. In the context of EOIR Asylum Statistics, it spotlight’s the significant advantage triggered by legal expertise, demonstrating a quintuple growth in favourability for cases involving legal representation. Thus, it embodies both the challenges that asylum seekers face, and potential measures that could dramatically enhance their prospects through advocacy and legal support.

In 2020, the Arlington Immigration Court in Virginia had a 63.8% asylum grant rate.

The 2020 statistic, highlighting a 63.8% asylum grant rate by the Arlington Immigration Court in Virginia, packs a potent message in the narrative of EOIR Asylum Statistics. It is a concrete testament to the ebbs and flows of immigration patterns and the corresponding policy responses. This numerical snapshot not only portrays Arlington as a region of relative asylum approval, it also intimates a shift in policy stances or processing efforts from previous years. As such, the statistic enhances understanding of broader trends, potential regional disparities and the varying operation style across different courts, contributing a vital piece to the complex EOIR Asylum puzzle.

In 2017, the median of days to decide an affirmative asylum application was 180 days.

This key figure, highlighting that the median number of days to decide an affirmative asylum application was 180 days in 2017, lends a vital perspective to our exploration of EOIR asylum statistics. It essentially sheds light on the duration within which asylum-seeking individuals and families were left in limbo, underscoring the significant bureaucratic inefficiencies and potential human rights concerns associated with prolonged decision timelines. This statistic provides a benchmark to analyze progress, or lack of, and determine whether changes in policy or procedures have been effective or deleterious over time in terms of timely decision-making. Moreover, this temporal aspect of processing asylum applications could be linked to various human, social, and economic consequences, turning the spotlight towards the urgent need for streamlining and expediting the asylum determination process.

There were 44,271 new EOIR asylum cases nationwide in 2010.

Unveiling the intricacies of EOIR asylum statistics, we step into 2010 – a year that saw the emergence of 44,271 fresh EOIR asylum cases across the nation. These numbers shouldn’t be overlooked, as they colorfully paint a picture of how the trends have shifted over the years, influencing policy-making, discussions, and social discourse nationwide. It chronicles the journeys and battles of these asylum seekers, serves as a testament to the urgency of their plight, and sheds light on the scale at which the EOIR is sought, becoming a critical link in our pursuit to understand this facet of the immigration system.

The New York Immigration Court had the highest level of representation, with 85% of represented cases in 2016.

Spotlighting the remarkable figure of 85% representation in 2016, the New York Immigration Court’s performance serves as a significant talking point in the narrative of EOIR Asylum Statistics. These compelling data points accentuate the importance of legal representation in immigration proceedings, particularly those relating to asylum requests. This impressive record creates a benchmark and exhibits the potential of achieving high representation levels. In deciphering the narratives intertwined with immigration and asylum adjudications, this statistic stands as a beacon, illuminating the value of legal counsel in navigating the intricate labyrinth of the U.S immigration system and their direct impact on individual outcomes.

In 2020, Mexican nationals had an asylum denial rate of 85.7%.

The startling revelation that Mexican nationals faced an 85.7% asylum denial rate in 2020 sets a remarkable backdrop in our deep dive into EOIR Asylum Statistics. This data point paints a stark picture of the realities faced by Mexican asylum seekers in the United States, and subsequently, stirs thought-provoking conversations about immigration laws and their implementation. In the context of EOIR Asylum Statistics, this discrepancy couldn’t be more pivotal, shedding light on the distinct ethnographic disparities in asylum decision trends and prompting us to investigate further into the underlying decisions, processes, and potential biases.

67.6% individuals seeking asylum in Chicago Immigration Court were denied in 2020.

Examining the impactful figure of 67.6% asylum seekers facing rejection in the Chicago Immigration Court in 2020 paints a concerning picture of the reality many immigrants confront within EOIR asylum procedures. Contextualizing this data within a broader narrative, it offers blog readers a concrete understanding of the heightened challenges and barriers asylum seekers face in Chicago. It further underscores the observable harshness of Chicago’s immigration policies, giving substance to potential dialogues on reforming the EOIR procedures, and invites a deeper investigation into regional disparities in asylum acceptance rates across the U.S.

In 2020, Miami Immigration Court denied 82.6% of asylum cases.

Painting a stark reality, the 2020 data reveals that Miami Immigration Court rejected more than four out of five asylum seekers, illustrating the highest denial rates in recent years. This statistic becomes pivotal when you explore EOIR Asylum Statistics, for it not only underscores the stringent stance of the court towards asylum petitions but also drives home the dire circumstances asylum seekers face in Miami. Any discourse or debate on EOIR Asylum Statistics would therefore be incomplete without acknowledging these figures, shedding light on them and understanding the implications they carry for asylum policy and practice.

In 2017, EOIR reported a record high of 61,094 defensive asylum applications.

Highlighting the record high of 61,094 defensive asylum applications reported by the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) in 2017 serves as a compelling testament to the escalating international impact on U.S. immigration proceedings. This crucial figure underscores the acutely intensified workload shouldered by the immigration courts. The unprecedented number of defensive asylum applications in this specific time frame paints a clear and eye-opening narrative of the gravity and complexity of humanitarian concerns globally, thus shaping our perception of EOIR’s crucial role in handling asylum cases. Therefore, the statistic becomes an anchoring point, helping us to visualize and better understand the evolving landscape of asylum law within the United States.

Conclusion

The EOIR asylum statistics provide invaluable insights into the trends and patterns of asylum cases within the U.S. Each statistic tells a unique story of the varying attributes that influence the outcomes of these cases – from nationality to representation status. It’s clear that the process is deeply complex, with numerous factors swaying decisions, and an ever-evolving sociopolitical climate further impacting the figures. Therefore, it remains crucial to keep a finger on the pulse of these trends to better understand asylum proceedings and make a positive impact on the lives of asylum seekers.

References

0. – https://www.www.humanrightsfirst.org

1. – https://www.fas.org

2. – https://www.trac.syr.edu

3. – https://www.repository.library.georgetown.edu

4. – https://www.www.justice.gov

5. – https://www.bipartisanpolicy.org

FAQs

What is Eoir Asylum?

EOIR Asylum is a legal protection granted by the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) in the United States to individuals who can demonstrate they have been persecuted, or fear they will be persecuted, in their home country on the basis of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion.

Who can apply for Eoir Asylum?

Any foreign national in the United States or arriving at a U.S. port of entry can apply for EOIR Asylum, regardless of their current immigration status. However, the individual must prove they meet the definition of a refugee, i.e., they're unable or unwilling to return to their country of origin because they've been persecuted or fear future persecution.

What are the chances of being granted EOIR Asylum?

The chances of being granted EOIR Asylum depend on several factors like the strength of the case, the credibility of the applicant, and the nature of the persecution in the applicant's home country. Statistically, asylum grant rates vary significantly and can range anywhere from 10% to 50% depending on nationality, year, and court location.

What happens if an EOIR Asylum application is denied?

If an EOIR Asylum application is denied, the applicant can be placed in removal proceedings if they're not in a legal immigration status. However, they have the right to appeal the decision before the Board of Immigration Appeals within 30 days of the denial.

How long does the EOIR Asylum process take?

The duration of the EOIR Asylum process can vary widely. It can range from a few months to several years, depending on factors such as the complexity of the case, the backlog of pending cases at the immigration court, and whether the applicant is in detention or not. However, the EOIR is working constantly to improve efficiency and reduce processing times.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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