GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Diversity In The Cannabis Industry Statistics

Diversity in the cannabis industry is lacking, with a higher percentage of white individuals holding leadership positions compared to minority groups.

Highlights: Diversity In The Cannabis Industry Statistics

  • A 2019 survey revealed that only 2% of the cannabis industry was African American owned.
  • A Maryland medical cannabis commission found that out of the 100 companies licensed to grow, process or dispense marijuana, only 26% were owned by racial or ethnic minorities.
  • The ownership diversity in medical cannabis firms in Pennsylvania was only 40% for female and non-white owned companies.
  • 81% of U.S. Cannabis business owners are white.
  • As of 2019, approximately 12% of senior roles in Canadian cannabis companies were filled by visible minorities.
  • Only 4.3% of cannabis business owners identify as Hispanic.
  • According to a survey, 37% of senior roles in cannabis are held by women, which is higher than the national average across all industries.
  • Just 10% of Canadian cannabis company board members are visible minorities.
  • Approximately 5.7% of cannabis business owners and founders identify as African American.
  • As of 2019, a reported six percent of those working in the cannabis industry in Canada are Indigenous.
  • Only 8% of cannabis patents are owned by women.
  • Only 15% of Washington state's legal cannabis businesses are owned or established by minorities.
  • Approximately 3.7% of cannabis business owners identify as Asian.

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The Latest Diversity In The Cannabis Industry Statistics Explained

A 2019 survey revealed that only 2% of the cannabis industry was African American owned.

The statistic indicates that in 2019, only a small portion of the cannabis industry, specifically 2%, was owned by individuals of African American descent. This suggests a significant disparity in ownership within the industry, reflecting potential barriers or challenges faced by African American entrepreneurs in accessing and establishing businesses within the cannabis market. The statistic highlights an important issue of diversity and inclusion within the industry, potentially pointing to systemic inequalities that may impact opportunities for ownership and participation for marginalized groups. Addressing this disparity may require targeted efforts and initiatives to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion within the cannabis industry.

A Maryland medical cannabis commission found that out of the 100 companies licensed to grow, process or dispense marijuana, only 26% were owned by racial or ethnic minorities.

The statistic presented by the Maryland medical cannabis commission indicates that there is a disparity in ownership of cannabis-related businesses among racial or ethnic minorities in the state. Specifically, only 26 out of the 100 licensed companies for growing, processing, or dispensing marijuana are owned by individuals from minority racial or ethnic backgrounds. This suggests that the majority of ownership in the legal cannabis industry in Maryland is held by non-minority individuals or groups. Such disparities in ownership highlight potential challenges related to equity, access, and opportunities for minority entrepreneurs in the cannabis business market, underscoring the importance of addressing diversity and inclusion in the industry.

The ownership diversity in medical cannabis firms in Pennsylvania was only 40% for female and non-white owned companies.

This statistic indicates that in Pennsylvania, only 40% of medical cannabis firms are owned by females and individuals from non-white backgrounds, reflecting a lack of ownership diversity within the industry. The low representation of female and non-white owners suggests potential barriers to entry or advancement for marginalized groups in the medical cannabis sector, highlighting the need for increased opportunities and support for underrepresented entrepreneurs. Promoting greater diversity in ownership can lead to a more inclusive and equitable industry that better serves the needs of diverse communities and fosters innovation and growth.

81% of U.S. Cannabis business owners are white.

The statistic stating that 81% of U.S. cannabis business owners are white indicates a lack of racial diversity within the industry. This high percentage suggests that white individuals have a significant presence and dominance in owning cannabis businesses compared to people of other racial backgrounds. The imbalance in ownership raises concerns about equity and access to opportunities within the cannabis industry, pointing towards potential systemic barriers that hinder individuals from diverse racial backgrounds from actively participating and succeeding in the business sector. Addressing and actively working towards increasing diversity and inclusion in ownership can help promote a fair and inclusive industry that benefits a wider range of individuals and communities.

As of 2019, approximately 12% of senior roles in Canadian cannabis companies were filled by visible minorities.

The statistic indicates that as of 2019, about 12% of senior leadership positions within Canadian cannabis companies were held by individuals who are classified as visible minorities. This suggests that there is some representation of diversity within the higher ranks of the industry, although the percentage remains relatively low compared to the overall population demographics in Canada. The statistic highlights the need for continued efforts towards promoting diversity and inclusivity within the cannabis sector, as well as the potential benefits that can be derived from a more diverse leadership team in terms of innovation, decision-making, and overall industry growth.

Only 4.3% of cannabis business owners identify as Hispanic.

This statistic indicates that there is a significant underrepresentation of Hispanic individuals among cannabis business owners, with only 4.3% self-identifying as such. This suggests a lack of diversity in the ownership demographic within the cannabis industry, potentially reflecting barriers faced by Hispanic individuals in entering or establishing businesses within this sector. The disparity in representation could be due to various factors, such as limited access to capital, regulatory challenges, or unequal opportunities compared to other demographic groups. Addressing these disparities and promoting inclusivity in the cannabis industry may be important for fostering a more diverse and equitable business environment.

According to a survey, 37% of senior roles in cannabis are held by women, which is higher than the national average across all industries.

The statistic highlights that in the cannabis industry, 37% of senior roles are occupied by women, surpassing the national average for female representation in leadership positions across all industries. This indicates a more equitable distribution of senior positions among genders in the cannabis sector compared to the broader business landscape. The findings suggest that the cannabis industry may be more inclusive and diverse in terms of fostering gender equality at the leadership level, which could have positive implications for promoting women’s advancement and representation in traditionally male-dominated industries.

Just 10% of Canadian cannabis company board members are visible minorities.

This statistic suggests that there is a lack of diversity among board members in Canadian cannabis companies, as only 10% of board members are visible minorities. Visible minorities represent a significant portion of the Canadian population, so the underrepresentation of this group in leadership positions within the cannabis industry raises concerns about equity and inclusivity. This lack of diversity at the board level may limit the perspectives, experiences, and expertise that could contribute to the overall success and innovation of the cannabis companies. Addressing this issue by promoting diversity and inclusion initiatives can help enhance decision-making processes, foster a more representative leadership, and align with broader societal values of equality and social justice.

Approximately 5.7% of cannabis business owners and founders identify as African American.

This statistic indicates that a relatively small proportion, specifically around 5.7%, of individuals who own or have founded cannabis businesses self-identify as African American. This implies that there is an underrepresentation of African Americans in the cannabis industry when considering ownership and leadership positions. Such disparities may be reflective of broader societal inequalities and barriers that minority groups face in entering and establishing themselves in certain industries. The low percentage suggests a lack of diversity within the cannabis business sector in terms of racial representation and highlights the need for more inclusive practices and initiatives to promote diversity and equity within this industry.

As of 2019, a reported six percent of those working in the cannabis industry in Canada are Indigenous.

The statistic indicates that as of 2019, approximately six percent of individuals employed in the cannabis industry in Canada are of Indigenous descent. This suggests a small representation of Indigenous people within the sector compared to the overall workforce. The statistic highlights potential disparities in employment opportunities and representation in the cannabis industry, emphasizing the need for increased diversity and inclusion efforts to ensure fair and equitable participation for Indigenous communities. Understanding and addressing these disparities can lead to more inclusive and supportive environments for Indigenous individuals in the industry, ultimately contributing to greater diversity and representation within this sector.

Only 8% of cannabis patents are owned by women.

The statistic that only 8% of cannabis patents are owned by women indicates a significant gender disparity in ownership within the field of cannabis innovation. This suggests that there is likely an underrepresentation of women in the development and ownership of intellectual property related to cannabis products and technologies. Such a low percentage may reflect systemic barriers that limit women’s participation and success in the cannabis industry, including issues related to access to funding, lack of mentorship opportunities, and gender biases. Addressing this gender gap is important for promoting diversity and inclusivity in the cannabis sector and fostering a more equitable environment for innovation and entrepreneurship.

Only 15% of Washington state’s legal cannabis businesses are owned or established by minorities.

This statistic indicates that a relatively small proportion, specifically 15%, of the legal cannabis businesses operating in Washington state are owned or established by minorities. This suggests a lack of diversity and representation among the industry players in the state, with a significant majority of cannabis businesses being owned by non-minority individuals or groups. The statistic highlights potential disparities in access to opportunities for minority entrepreneurs in the cannabis market, pointing towards a need for strategies and policies to promote greater inclusion and equity within the industry. Efforts to address barriers and support minority-owned cannabis businesses could help foster a more diverse and inclusive cannabis sector in Washington state.

Approximately 3.7% of cannabis business owners identify as Asian.

This statistic indicates that around 3.7% of individuals who own cannabis businesses self-identify as Asian. This figure provides insight into the diversity within the cannabis industry in terms of racial representation among business owners. The statistic suggests that there is a relatively low proportion of Asian-owned cannabis businesses compared to other racial groups. Understanding the demographic composition of ownership within the cannabis industry can inform discussions and policies related to equity, inclusion, and representation in this evolving and increasingly important sector.

References

0. – https://www.www.bcbusiness.ca

1. – https://www.crosscut.com

2. – https://www.greenentrepreneur.com

3. – https://www.www.bostonglobe.com

4. – https://www.apnews.com

5. – https://www.www.marijuanaventure.com

6. – https://www.www.baltimoresun.com

7. – https://www.www.westword.com

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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