GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Cremation Vs Burial Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Cremation Vs Burial Statistics

  • In 2020, the rate of cremation in the United States reached 56%, surpassing the burial rate which was around 37.5%. Source: (CANA, 2020)
  • In Canada, the cremation rate is projected to reach 77.8% by 2025. Source: (CANA, 2020).
  • The UK has a higher cremation rate than the US, reaching 78% in 2018.
  • In 1960 only 3.56% of the US population chose cremation, showing a significant increase over past decades.
  • More than 80% of all deaths in Japan end with cremation.
  • The global funeral market, including both burial and cremation services, is expected to grow at a CAGR of 4.7% from 2021 to 2028.
  • The average traditional funeral service and burial costs between $7,000-$10,000, while cremation costs range from $1,000-$3,000.
  • In 2016, Australia recorded a cremation rate of 70% compared to burial.
  • 7% of the Israeli population choose cremation over traditional burials.
  • Denmark has a cremation rate of 76% compared to burials.
  • Only 8% of Greece's population prefers cremation over traditional burials, largely because Orthodox Church strongly condemns the practice.
  • Despite traditionally favoring burial, 72% of French people were cremated in 2020.
  • The U.S. cremation rate is expected to reach 79.1% by 2035, indicating a major shift from traditional burial practices.
  • On average, cremations release 534.6 pounds of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, contributing to greenhouse gases.
  • In 2020, 62% of Americans aged 40 and over were said to be somewhat likely or very likely to consider cremation for themselves.
  • 22% of senior citizens (ages 75+) in the US show a stronger preference for burial over cremation.
  • Experts suggest the increasing popularity of cremation is driven partly by its relative affordability, with the cost of a traditional funeral and burial often three times higher than that of cremation.

Table of Contents

As individuals grapple with end-of-life decisions, choices about disposition of remains are becoming increasingly crucial. This blog post delves into the complex subject of cremation versus burial, offering an objective view through insightful statistical analysis. We explore the varying factors contributing to the growing trend towards cremation, including cultural, ecological, and financial aspects. Through contrasting these figures and trends against burial statistics across diverse demographic segments, this overview presents a thorough, data-driven exploration of personal and societal preferences and implications surrounding these deeply personal choices.

The Latest Cremation Vs Burial Statistics Unveiled

In 2020, the rate of cremation in the United States reached 56%, surpassing the burial rate which was around 37.5%. Source: (CANA, 2020)

Reflecting upon the profound transformation in the preference for final end-of-life rites in the United States, it becomes fascinating to note the sway in the narrative as captured by the CANA report of 2020. The cremation rate clocked 56%, comfortably outpacing the burial rate pegged at roughly 37.5%. This, beyond doubt, signals an eloquent paradigm shift in funeral practices, painting a vivid testament to changing societal beliefs, cost implications, and environmental considerations. What this underlines in the narrative of our cremation versus burial statistics blog post, is a groundbreaking preference for cremation, marking a new frontier in the historic debate between burial and cremation.

In Canada, the cremation rate is projected to reach 77.8% by 2025. Source: (CANA, 2020).

Highlighting the projected cremation rate in Canada provides a substantial piece of evidence in the Cremation Vs Burial discourse. Reflecting an upward trend, the CANA’s prediction of a 77.8% cremation rate by 2025 underscores a marked preference for this practice. The figure carries weight by informing readers of the shifting societal norms and attitudes towards death care options, and facilitates a deeper understanding of the increasing popularity and acceptance of cremation as a potential alternative to traditional burial options. This trend is critical to grasp for anyone interested in understanding current and future burial practices, or those potentially facing the difficult decision of choosing between cremation and burial themselves.

The UK has a higher cremation rate than the US, reaching 78% in 2018.

Highlighting the fact that the UK saw a cremation rate of 78% in 2018 not only underscores a significant cultural contrast with the US, it paints a vivid picture of the prevalent funeral practices in today’s era. This statistic becomes equally intriguing while studying Crementation Vs burial statistics because it sets a comparative basis for understanding global trends and practices around death, suggesting an ongoing shift from traditional burial towards cremation. It underlines the importance of cultural perspectives in selecting after-death rituals and helps readers detect emerging patterns and predict future trends.

In 1960 only 3.56% of the US population chose cremation, showing a significant increase over past decades.

Highlighting the statistic that in 1960, only 3.56% of the U.S. population chose cremation ignites an interesting perspective to the cremation versus burial discourse. It serves as a torch shedding light back in time, revealing just how much people’s preferences have evolved or pivoted in their final rites. Drawing from such threads from the past enriches our understanding of the societal, cultural, and financial factors that have shifted to catapult the modest figure from the 1960s into the much higher rates of cremation we see today. By examining this crossroads, we weave a more nuanced narrative for the readers and paint a picture of an evolving cultural landscape.

More than 80% of all deaths in Japan end with cremation.

Highlighting the striking figure of over 80% cremation rate in Japan underscores the globally contrasting preferences and customs related to after-death practices. This data point offers a compelling testament to the cultural, historical, and perhaps economical inclinations that have made cremation a dominant choice in the Japanese context. When juxtaposed with the burial statistics of other nations in the blog post, it not only enriches the discussion of Cremation vs Burial Statistics but also drives home the singular truth – the diversity and adaptability of human rituals related to death and remembrance as influenced by various factors such as tradition, belief systems, and environmental considerations.

The global funeral market, including both burial and cremation services, is expected to grow at a CAGR of 4.7% from 2021 to 2028.

The projected growth rate of the global funeral market, anticipating a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 4.7% from 2021 to 2028, is a critical piece of information when deliberating around burial and cremation trends. This positive CAGR signals a mounting global trend towards professional funeral services. It suggests potential lucrative opportunities within the sector, guiding stakeholders like funeral service providers, consumers, and investors, particularly when dissecting the cremation versus burial debate. By understanding this growth, we can piece together the evolving preferences of consumers, whether they lean towards cremation or burial and how these preferences shape the future of the funeral industry.

The average traditional funeral service and burial costs between $7,000-$10,000, while cremation costs range from $1,000-$3,000.

Navigating through the raw numbers of funeral and interment expenses presents an enlightening perspective on the topic of cremation versus burial. Grappling with the stark contrast in costs, the average traditional funeral service and burial impose a significant financial burden, ranging from $7,000-$10,000. On the other hand, cremation emerges as a more economically viable option for many, with costs residing in the $1,000-$3,000 bracket. This disparity in costs potentially has a pivotal influence on decision-making parameters, casting light on why an increasing number of people might be leaning towards cremation, thereby reshaping the conversation and future trends enveloping after-life care and rituals.

In 2016, Australia recorded a cremation rate of 70% compared to burial.

Highlighting the compelling statistic from 2016 that Australia recorded a 70% rate of choosing cremation over burial underscores the emerging global trend towards this method of funeral care, adding an essential layer of depth to the discourse on ‘Cremation Vs Burial Statistics’. As a testament to changing societal preferences and perhaps influenced by various factors like religion, cultural shift, cost-effectiveness and environmental concerns, this figure provides a key insight into cultural behaviours while also potentially sparking further discourse on the practices of death care in other countries, making it a crucial component of the blog post.

7% of the Israeli population choose cremation over traditional burials.

Highlighting the statistic that 7% of the Israeli population choose cremation over traditional burials provides insightful context into prevailing end-of-life decisions in diverse cultures, in this case, Israel. In a blog post about Cremation Vs Burial Statistics, this figure adds depth to the readers’ understanding when comparing international trends and preferences. It also offers a valuable perspective on the cultural, religious, and possibly economic factors influencing these choices in Israel, thereby enriching the conversation around burial practices.

Denmark has a cremation rate of 76% compared to burials.

Delving into the comparison between cremation and burial statistics across various parts of the globe brings us interesting figures; an outstanding one hails from Denmark. With a significant 76% of the population opting for cremation over burial, this Scandinavian nation presents compelling proof of a powerful cultural shift. The figure not only reinforces the worldwide trend towards cremation, but also underscores the environmental, economic, and space considerations making it a frequent choice. It serves as a vivid illustration of how societal norms, beliefs, and values evolve over time, thereby affecting mortality practices and reflecting underlying societal changes.

Only 8% of Greece’s population prefers cremation over traditional burials, largely because Orthodox Church strongly condemns the practice.

Awakening to the realities of cultural and religious predispositions, this interesting piece of data underlines that a mere 8% of Greece’s populace favor cremation over customary burials. This figure shouldn’t be underestimated, particularly within the framework of a blog post centered on Cremation Vs Burial Statistics. It’s apparent stand-out connection to the strong condemnation of the practice by the Orthodox Church offers an evocative illustration of how societal norms, religious tenets, and personal beliefs interweave to shape people’s post-death preferences on a global scale.

Despite traditionally favoring burial, 72% of French people were cremated in 2020.

Exploring the rise of cremation over burial, this focus on France exposes a dramatic shift in funeral trends that may illuminate broader societal changes. The 2020 figure revealing a decisive 72% choosing cremation over burial signifies a drastic departure from traditional French funeral rites, suggesting evolving attitudes towards death, afterlife, and remembrance. This figure also introduces a new perspective in the Cremation Vs Burial debate, offering a compelling insight into a changing world of internment practices, cultural norms, and personal choices amidst France’s predominantly Catholic populace.

The U.S. cremation rate is expected to reach 79.1% by 2035, indicating a major shift from traditional burial practices.

Peering into the future landscape of final disposition choices in the U.S., it is remarkable to underscore the projection of an overwhelming ascent in cremation practices. The anticipated climb to a blistering 79.1% cremation rate by 2035 paints a vivid portrait of the seismic paradigm shift from the conventional burial methods. This transformation is not only pivotal in understanding individual’s changing perceptions towards mortality and repose, but equally crucial in delineating the economical, environmental, and societal ramifications that both burial and cremation methods hold. The amplified inclination towards cremation thus, forms an intriguing centerpiece of discussion in our ongoing dissection of Cremation Vs Burial statistics.

On average, cremations release 534.6 pounds of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, contributing to greenhouse gases.

Unveiling a rather striking dimension in the Cremation Vs Burial debate, the statistic insightfully states that cremations, on average, release 534.6 pounds of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. This assertion not just underlines the environmental impact of our last rites choice, but also opens up a profound discourse about the greenhouse gases’ contribution. As cremations appear to metaphorically fan the flames of global warming, they bring into light the indispensable need to carefully consider the ecological ramifications of our final send-off. Thus, our post-death decisions, ironically, have life altering implications for planet Earth and its future generations.

In 2020, 62% of Americans aged 40 and over were said to be somewhat likely or very likely to consider cremation for themselves.

Reflecting a significant shift in mortuary preferences, the freshly calculated 2020 statistic speaks volumes – a striking 62% of Americans aged 40 and over are leaning towards the contemplation or outright endorsement of cremation. This data point, crucial to the narrative fabric of a blog post about Cremation VS Burial statistics, underscores a burgeoning sociocultural trend, illustrating that the modern sentiments around life’s end are gravitating noticeably towards cremation. As such, it offers rich, topical insights that would serve to anchor, shape, and orient the discourse of the post, turning a spotlight on the evolving dynamics in the realm of last rites.

22% of senior citizens (ages 75+) in the US show a stronger preference for burial over cremation.

Delving into the dichotomy of cremation versus burial, a compelling nugget of insight emerges from the realm of senior citizens, specifically those 75 years or above. The fact that 22% of these seniors demonstrate a proclivity towards burial over cremation sheds light on the rich tapestry of preferences, traditions, and ideologies that characterise this demographic. Within a blog exploring this death care debate, such a fact underlays the importance of considering age and generational beliefs when quantifying preferences, ultimately enriching our understanding of how personal and societal ideologies shape choices on last rites in the American society.

Experts suggest the increasing popularity of cremation is driven partly by its relative affordability, with the cost of a traditional funeral and burial often three times higher than that of cremation.

As we weigh the pros and cons in our Cremation Vs Burial dialogue, the economic aspect emerges as an influential factor. The discussion gets a notable perspective with the revelation that, as per experts’ analysis, the sprouting preference for cremation may be fueled by economic considerations. The price tag attached to a traditional funeral and burial typically dwarfs that of cremation – generally being threefold. Thus, cremation presents a compelling and pragmatic option for many individuals, balancing their emotional needs with financial practicality. This price disparity between the two options indeed contributes significantly to the growing cremation statistics, illustrating a strong correlation between affordability and choice of final rites.

Conclusion

In sum, an analysis of the cremation versus burial trends indicates a shift in societal perceptions and practices. Cremations have significantly surpassed burials, a trend projected to continue based on financial reasoning, environmental concerns, decreased religious constraints, and increasing acceptance of the cremation process. The adoption of new practices often signifies evolving societal norms and the case of cremation versus burial statistics offers a quantifiable testament to this phenomenon.

References

0. – https://www.www.neptunesociety.com

1. – https://www.www.cremationassociation.org

2. – https://www.www.scientificamerican.com

3. – https://www.cremationinstitute.com

4. – https://www.www.nfda.org

5. – https://www.www.funeralguide.net

6. – https://www.www.grandviewresearch.com

7. – https://www.www.reuters.com

8. – https://www.www.cnbc.com

9. – https://www.www.jpost.com

10. – https://www.www.funeralguide.co.uk

FAQs

What is the basic difference between cremation and burial?

The core difference lies in the method of final disposition. Burial involves placing the body in a coffin and interring it in a grave or tomb. Cremation, on the other hand, involves combusting the body at high temperatures and then placing the remaining ashes in an urn, scattering them, or burying them.

Which one is more prevalent globally, cremations or burials?

Cremation rates vary highly from country to country. However, a growing trend towards cremation has been noted in many Western countries due to changing religious beliefs, socio-cultural shifts, and economic factors. In several countries in Asia, like India and Nepal, cremation has been a longstanding tradition.

Is cremation a more cost-effective option compared to burial?

Generally, cremation can be a more economical option compared to traditional burial, especially if direct cremation is chosen, in which the body is cremated shortly after death without a service. However, costs can rise if a person opts for additional services or memorial events.

What is the environmental impact of cremation vs burial?

Both have environmental impacts. Cremation uses energy and releases gases into the atmosphere, including carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. Burials, particularly when combined with embalming, can contribute to water pollution and consume land space. Some prefer green burials, which aim to minimize environmental impacts.

Are there more options for memorialization with burial or cremation?

Both provide various memorialization options. A burial lets people visit a concrete place - a grave or tombstone. Cremation, on the other hand, allows for different forms of remembrance, such as scattering ashes in a significant place, keeping them in a decorative urn, compressing them into jewelry, or even incorporating them into a coral reef.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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