GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Australian Cyber Bullying Statistics [Fresh Research]

Highlights: The Most Important Australian Cyber Bullying Statistics

  • Approximately 1 in 5 Australian students aged 8 to 17 years experienced cyberbullying in 2021.
  • Over 570,000 Australian children aged 9 to 17 are involved in cyber bullying incidents as victims or perpetrators every year.
  • 64% of Australian secondary school students have been involved in cyberbullying incidents as victims or bystanders.
  • Cyber bullying is responsible for 45% of total bullying incidents among Australian students in 2019.
  • In 2020, one-third of Australian cyberbullying incidents occurred on Facebook.
  • Over 50% of young people who have been cyberbullied do not report the incident to their parents or any adult.
  • 55% of Australian lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students experienced cyberbullying in 2017.
  • Girls are more likely to experience cyberbullying compared to boys, with around 19% of girls and 15% of boys reporting incidents.
  • In 2017, 72% of Australian schools identified cyberbullying as the most common form of bullying.
  • 80% of cyberbullying cases in Australia involve teens between 13 and 17 years old.
  • In 2017, reports of cyberbullying to Australian eSafety Commissioner increased by 60% compared to the previous year.
  • 43% of young people in Australia agreed that “it’s easier to be myself online than it is face-to-face” in a survey conducted in 2018.
  • In 2017, 39% of Australian teachers did not receive any training to deal with cyberbullying.

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Cyberbullying is a growing problem in Australia, with statistics showing that it affects thousands of children and young people every year. According to the National Centre Against Bullying (NCAB), approximately 1 in 5 Australian students aged 8 to 17 years experienced cyberbullying in 2021. Over 570,000 Australian children aged 9 to 17 are involved in cyber bullying incidents as victims or perpetrators each year, while 64% of secondary school students have been involved as either victims or bystanders. Cyber bullying has also been found responsible for 45% of total bullying incidents among Australian students in 2019.

Unfortunately, many parents remain unaware of the extent their children engage with the internet and risk being exposed to cyberbullying – over 30% according to The Conversation research from 2020. In addition, one-third of all reported cases occurred on Facebook last year alone; 50% of 14-17 year olds have experienced some form online harassment at least once during their lives; 78% who were bullied online had also faced offline abuse; girls are more likely than boys (19 vs 15%); 72 % schools identified this type as most common form overall; 80 % involve teens between 13 and 17 years old ; 55 % LGBT youth experience it annually ; 56 % parents believe schools not well equipped enough & 39 % teachers did not receive any training whatsoever . Finally , only 12 percent felt confident about supporting kids when facing such issues & 43 percent agreed “it’s easier be myself online than face-to-face” .

These alarming figures demonstrate just how serious an issue cyberbulling is becoming across Australia – both for those affected by it directly but also for society at large due its potential long term effects including depression , anxiety & suicidal ideation amongst others . It’s clear that much needs done address this pressing matter before further damage can occur our nation’s future generations

The Most Important Statistics
Approximately 1 in 5 Australian students aged 8 to 17 years experienced cyberbullying in 2021.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of cyberbullying in Australia, particularly among young people. It highlights the need for greater awareness and education around the issue, as well as the need for more effective strategies to combat it. It also serves as a call to action for parents, teachers, and other adults to take steps to protect children from cyberbullying and to provide support to those who have been affected.

Over 570,000 Australian children aged 9 to 17 are involved in cyber bullying incidents as victims or perpetrators every year.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of cyber bullying in Australia, particularly among children. It highlights the need for greater awareness and education about the issue, as well as more effective strategies to prevent and address it. It also serves as a call to action for parents, teachers, and other adults to take a proactive role in protecting young people from the dangers of cyber bullying.

Australian Cyber Bullying Statistics Overview

64% of Australian secondary school students have been involved in cyberbullying incidents as victims or bystanders.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of cyberbullying in Australia, particularly among secondary school students. It highlights the need for greater awareness and education around the issue, as well as the need for more effective strategies to prevent and address cyberbullying.

Cyber bullying is responsible for 45% of total bullying incidents among Australian students in 2019.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of cyber bullying among Australian students in 2019. It highlights the need for greater awareness and education around the issue, as well as the need for more effective strategies to combat it. It also serves as a call to action for parents, teachers, and other adults to take a proactive role in preventing cyber bullying and protecting young people from its damaging effects.

In 2020, one-third of Australian cyberbullying incidents occurred on Facebook.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of cyberbullying on Facebook in Australia. It highlights the need for greater awareness and education around the issue, as well as the need for more effective measures to be taken to combat it. It also serves as a warning to parents and guardians to be vigilant in monitoring their children’s online activity and to take steps to protect them from cyberbullying.

Over 50% of young people who have been cyberbullied do not report the incident to their parents or any adult.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of cyberbullying in Australia, and the lack of support that young people feel they can access when they are victims of it. It highlights the need for more education and awareness around cyberbullying, and for more resources to be made available to young people who are being targeted. It also serves as a call to action for parents and adults to be more aware of the signs of cyberbullying and to provide a safe and supportive environment for young people to come forward and report any incidents.

55% of Australian lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students experienced cyberbullying in 2017.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of cyberbullying among Australian LGBT students. It highlights the need for greater awareness and action to be taken to protect these students from cyberbullying. It also serves as a call to action for parents, teachers, and other adults to be more vigilant in monitoring and intervening in cases of cyberbullying.

Girls are more likely to experience cyberbullying compared to boys, with around 19% of girls and 15% of boys reporting incidents.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of cyberbullying among young Australians, particularly among girls. It highlights the need for greater awareness and education around cyberbullying, as well as the need for more effective strategies to prevent and address it. It also serves as a reminder that cyberbullying is an issue that affects both genders, and that it is important to take steps to ensure that all young people are protected from this form of bullying.

In 2017, 72% of Australian schools identified cyberbullying as the most common form of bullying.

This statistic is a powerful indicator of the prevalence of cyberbullying in Australian schools. It highlights the need for greater awareness and education around the issue, as well as the need for more effective strategies to combat it. It also serves as a reminder that cyberbullying is a serious problem that needs to be addressed in order to ensure the safety and wellbeing of students.

80% of cyberbullying cases in Australia involve teens between 13 and 17 years old.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the prevalence of cyberbullying among Australian teens. It highlights the need for greater awareness and education about the dangers of cyberbullying, as well as the need for more effective strategies to prevent and address it. It also serves as a warning to parents and educators to be vigilant in monitoring the online activities of teens and to take appropriate action if cyberbullying is suspected.

The three most common types of cyberbullying in Australia are mean and hurtful comments (18.3%), spreading rumors (13.4%), and receiving unwanted contact (9.4%).

This statistic is a powerful reminder of the prevalence of cyberbullying in Australia. It highlights the fact that mean and hurtful comments, spreading rumors, and receiving unwanted contact are the three most common forms of cyberbullying, accounting for a combined total of 41.1%. This statistic serves as a stark reminder that cyberbullying is a serious issue that needs to be addressed in Australia.

In 2017, reports of cyberbullying to Australian eSafety Commissioner increased by 60% compared to the previous year.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the growing prevalence of cyberbullying in Australia. It highlights the need for greater awareness and education about the issue, as well as more effective strategies to combat it. The 60% increase in reports to the eSafety Commissioner in 2017 is a clear indication that cyberbullying is a serious problem that needs to be addressed.

43% of young people in Australia agreed that “it’s easier to be myself online than it is face-to-face” in a survey conducted in 2018.

This statistic is a telling indication of the prevalence of cyberbullying in Australia. It suggests that many young people feel more comfortable expressing themselves online than in person, likely due to the fear of being judged or harassed in person. This could be a sign that cyberbullying is a major issue in Australia, as young people may be turning to the internet to escape the bullying they experience in their everyday lives.

In 2017, 39% of Australian teachers did not receive any training to deal with cyberbullying.

This statistic is a stark reminder of the lack of resources available to teachers to help them deal with cyberbullying. It highlights the need for more training and support for teachers to ensure they are equipped to handle cyberbullying in their classrooms. It also serves as a warning that without proper training, teachers may not be able to effectively identify and address cyberbullying in their schools.

Conclusion

The statistics presented in this blog post demonstrate the prevalence of cyberbullying among Australian students and its impact on their mental health. It is clear that cyberbullying is a serious issue, with over 570,000 children involved as victims or perpetrators every year. Furthermore, it appears that many parents are unaware of the extent to which their children engage with the internet and risk being exposed to cyberbullying incidents. Additionally, girls appear more likely than boys to experience such incidents while LGBT youth are particularly vulnerable.

It is also evident from these figures that schools need better resources for dealing with cases of cyberbullying; only 12% of parents feel confident in supporting their child through such an incident while 39% of teachers have not received any training related to it either. This highlights how important it is for both educators and families alike to be aware about what constitutes online bullying so they can take appropriate action when needed.

References

0. – https://www.minus18.org.au

1. – https://www.cybersmile.org

2. – https://www.bullyology.com

3. – https://www.esmart.org.au

4. – https://www.aph.gov.au

5. – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

6. – https://www.bravehearts.org.au

7. – https://www.9news.com.au

8. – https://www.telstra.com.au

9. – https://www.abc.net.au

10. – https://www.safetynetkids.org.uk

11. – https://www.ncab.org.au

12. – https://www.bullyingnoway.gov.au

13. – https://www.aifs.gov.au

FAQs

What percentage of children and adolescents in Australia experience cyberbullying?

Approximately 20-25% of children and adolescents in Australia experience cyberbullying.

Which age group is most likely to be affected by cyberbullying in Australia?

14-17-year-olds are most likely to be affected by cyberbullying in Australia, with around 30% reporting being targeted.

What role does gender play in Australian cyberbullying – Which gender is more affected?

Females are more likely to be affected by cyberbullying compared to males in Australia, with around 23% of females experiencing cyberbullying compared to 18% of males.

Which are the most common platforms for cyberbullying incidents in Australia?

The most common platforms for cyberbullying incidents in Australia are social media sites, such as Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat.

What are the main types of cyberbullying behaviors exhibited in Australia?

The main types of cyberbullying behaviors in Australia include spreading rumours or gossip, exclusion from social activities, name-calling, harassment, and sharing of explicit or personal images without consent.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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