GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Antisemitism Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Antisemitism Statistics

  • Approximately 70% of Jews in the United States feel that antisemitism in the country increased between 2018 and 2019.
  • 61% of all religious-based hate crimes in Canada in 2019 were directed against Jews.
  • 25% of Jewish students in the UK in 2020 experienced personal antisemitic harassment.
  • Germany saw an increase of 13% in reported antisemitic attacks in 2019.
  • A 2019 survey revealed 43% of Jews in the European Union considered emigrating due to antisemitism.
  • In 2020, 63% of antisemitic incidents in the US involved harassment, 35% involved vandalism, and 2% involved assault.
  • In 2020, almost half of British Jews said they feared Jews could have "no long term future in Europe.".
  • 27% of all antisemitic incidents in Australia in 2019-20 took place online.
  • A 2019 survey showed that 74% of Jewish students in the US experienced antisemitism online.
  • In 2019, 25% of US adults said that someone in their household had boycotted a brand or product due to its association with Israel.
  • The Anti-Defamation League found that 61% of American adults agreed with at least one antisemitic stereotype in 2020.
  • In 2020, 78% of reported antisemitic incidents in France targeted individuals.
  • A 2020 EU survey found that 85% of respondents perceived antisemitism to be a problem in their country.
  • In Argentina, there was 107% increase in antisemitic incidents from 2018 to 2019.
  • In 2019, approximately 50% of Italian Jews have experienced or witnessed antisemitic episodes.
  • According to ADL in 2020, 54% of Jewish adults in America have either experienced or heard antisemitic comments, slurs or threats.
  • In 2020, there were 2,024 recorded antisemitic incidents in the UK, the third highest annual total on record.

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Understanding the prevalence and trends of antisemitism is crucial in combating this deeply rooted form of prejudice. Our exploration into antisemitism statistics will reveal not only the alarming magnitude of this issue but also the disturbing global patterns we must acknowledge and confront. These statistics play a significant role in guiding our responses, raising awareness, and driving policy changes. Read on to delve into the comprehensible data analysis that portrays the reality of antisemitic attitudes and incidents worldwide.

The Latest Antisemitism Statistics Unveiled

Approximately 70% of Jews in the United States feel that antisemitism in the country increased between 2018 and 2019.

Drawing attention towards the deeply unsettling scenario of rising antisemitism, a statistical revelation unveils a concerning picture. Capturing the sentiments of America’s Jewish population, it is disquieting to note that approximately 70% felt an escalation in antisemitism between 2018 and 2019. This percentage, glaring against the backdrop of the Antisemitism Statistics blog post, is a potent reminder that more than just numbers, it’s an outcry, a reflection of the collective anxieties and the uphill struggle faced by the Jewish community. This indispensable piece of data helps chronicle the narrative of a growing social concern, pushing us to look beyond complacency and question the factors, perceptions and actions that are stoking the fire of cultural prejudice and hate.

61% of all religious-based hate crimes in Canada in 2019 were directed against Jews.

The statistic revealing that ‘61% of all religious-based hate crimes in Canada in 2019 were orchestrated against Jews’ paints a vivid picture, underscoring both the prominence and grim reality of antisemitism. In a world rooted in diversity and inclusivity, such a figure resonates a stark discord – becoming a pivotal point of discussion in a blog post with antisemitism as its primary focus. It bespeaks to the magnitude of intolerance, deep-seated prejudices, and mistrust targeted at the Jewish community; therefore, compelling readers to confront this uncomfortable truth, engage in conversation, and potentially take action towards fostering a more embracing society.

25% of Jewish students in the UK in 2020 experienced personal antisemitic harassment.

In the landscape of the Antisemitism discourse, the heartbreaking revelation that one in every four Jewish students in the UK in 2020 encountered personal antisemitic harassment is a poignant compass, directing us towards the magnitude of the problem. This alarming percentage serves as a forceful wake-up call, illuminating the urgency and gravity of the situation, and underscores the importance of our collective responsibility to halt the tide of discrimination and hate. Accordingly, this statistic forces us to scrutinize the specific environments we craft for our students, question the protections we have in place, and re-evaluate the shared values we purport to uphold.

Germany saw an increase of 13% in reported antisemitic attacks in 2019.

In crafting a narrative about Antisemitism Statistics, the cited surge of 13% in antisemitic attacks in Germany during 2019 is particularly poignant. This noteworthy uptick offers a stark portrayal of a continuing ripple of discrimination that pulsates beneath the surface of society. It earmarks a pressing reminder of the escalating concerns around antisemitism in contemporary times, providing food for thought in the broader discourse on tolerance and social respect. Furthermore, by shedding light on antisemitic trends within one of Europe’s mightiest democracies, it triggers a harder look into the effectiveness of strategies currently employed to combat raging social injustices.

A 2019 survey revealed 43% of Jews in the European Union considered emigrating due to antisemitism.

Highlighting the 2019 survey, which indicates that nearly half of the Jews in the European Union contemplated emigration due to anti-Semitism, uncovers a stark and worrying reality. This data point isn’t just an abstract figure; it translates into a palpable sentiment of insecurity and fear in a significant portion of the Jewish community. It’s a potent testimony on the rising tide of anti-Semitism and hints at its severe implications, such as potential cultural drain and demographic shift. In an analysis of anti-Semitism, this startling percentage underscores the urgency and necessity for actions to curb this discriminatory behavior, enabling some stark conclusions and reflections in the blog post.

In 2020, 63% of antisemitic incidents in the US involved harassment, 35% involved vandalism, and 2% involved assault.

Highlighting the 2020 statistics surrounding antisemitism in the U.S. uncovers a palpable, grim reality. Revealing that 63% of antisemitic incidents involved harassment, 35% entailed vandalism, and a not insignificant 2% even involved outright assault, these figures serve as a stark reminder of the prejudice existing within society. Illustrating the scale and nature of antisemitic incidents, these numbers provide a haunting picture, a crucial focal point, setting the context in a blog post discussing Antisemitism Statistics. This highlights the urgency and importance of addressing antisemitism, giving readers a grasp of its genuine severity that’s grounded in factual evidence.

In 2020, almost half of British Jews said they feared Jews could have “no long term future in Europe.”.

Integrating the powerful perspective from 2020 where nearly 50% of British Jews expressed anxiety over a potential lack of long-term future for Jews in Europe, casts an illuminating beam on the severity of Antisemitism in the continent. This insight brings into stark relief a disturbing reality, not just about the measurable extent and progression of anti-Jewish sentiments but, critically, how such pervasive hostility is shaping the very human and deeply personal fears and uncertainties of a community. In a discussion of Antisemitism statistics, this resonates profoundly, shedding a poignant, human light onto what is typically viewed through the detached lens of numbers and percentages.

27% of all antisemitic incidents in Australia in 2019-20 took place online.

The revealing statistic that over a quarter of all antisemitic incidents in Australia during 2019-20 unfolded in the digital realm, gives a sharp focus on the proliferating, yet often overlooked, problem of online antisemitism. Within the canvas of a blog post digging deep into Antisemitism Statistics, this digit imparts an enriching perspective. It underscores the dire need to recognize and tackle the growing menace of cyberspace hate crimes. Additionally, this deep-seated cyber issue has decisive implications for designing preventive measures and policies to combat antisemitism, highlighting the urgency to broaden our focus beyond just the physical world.

A 2019 survey showed that 74% of Jewish students in the US experienced antisemitism online.

Highlighting the striking statistic from a 2019 survey, where 74% of Jewish students in the US experienced antisemitism online, provides a sobering picture of the pervasive prejudice that has infiltrated the digital space, even impacting the younger demographic. It underlines the significance of understanding and tackling antisemitism from a comprehensive angle. This alarming figure underscores the urgency to promote digital literacy, enforce stricter online regulations, and cultivate an environment of respect and tolerance. It further serves as a call to action, emphasizing the need to take these figures beyond the realm of data and use them as tangible evidence for stronger advocacy against antisemistism.

In 2019, 25% of US adults said that someone in their household had boycotted a brand or product due to its association with Israel.

Interpreting the statistic that reveals a quarter of US adults in 2019 admitted that someone in their household had boycotted a brand or product tied to Israel, paints a critical image of growing trends and attitudes in America. While this figure alone does not directly signify antisemitism, it can be instrumental in narrating a broader story of social conduct when incorporated into a blog post about Antisemitism Statistics. This provocative figure underscores the shifting dynamics of consumer behavior and societal viewpoints towards Israel, potentially intertwined with antisemitic undertones, thereby enriching the discourse around the subject.

The Anti-Defamation League found that 61% of American adults agreed with at least one antisemitic stereotype in 2020.

In portraying the pervasive nature of antisemitism in contemporary American society, the Anti-Defamation League’s alarming find of 61% of American adults resonating with at least one antisemitic stereotype in 2020 delivers striking clarity. This remarkable statistic is not only indicative of the widespread persistence of bigotry in the United States but also serves as a quantifiable measure of societal bias and misguidance. As we dissect antisemitism through the lens of data and numbers in a blog article, we illuminate the reality of prejudiced belief systems existing within the core of societal thinking, thus sparking a much-needed dialogue of reform and education.

In 2020, 78% of reported antisemitic incidents in France targeted individuals.

Illuminating the gritty reality of antisemitism in France, the 2020 statistic uncovers that a daunting 78% of the reported antisemitic incidents were directly aimed at individuals. As part of a broader discussion on Antisemitism statistics, this particular figure underscores the chilling degree of personal hate crimes that continue to fuel antisemitism. It punctuates the urgency and necessity of developing effective strategies for prevention and response. The number underscores a distressing yet important truth: antisemitism is not a faceless, abstract social scourge, it is a horrid violation directly impacting individuals, thereby emphasizing the immediate need for action.

A 2020 EU survey found that 85% of respondents perceived antisemitism to be a problem in their country.

Demonstrating the pervasiveness of antisemitism across Europe, the revelation from the 2020 EU survey – that a striking 85% of participants identified antisemitism as an issue in their home countries – is a cornerstone in the architectural landscape of any discussion revolving around antisemitism statistics. This stark figure underscores an urgent, widespread concern and fosters a deeper understanding of the prevalence of this discrimination, offering an invaluable perspective for anyone navigating the often complex terrain of antisemitism. Such statistics not only catalog current conditions, but can also act as the catalyst for necessary dialogue, driving future policies and actions to address the issue.

In Argentina, there was 107% increase in antisemitic incidents from 2018 to 2019.

Highlighting the staggering 107% increase in antisemitic incidents in Argentina from 2018 to 2019 paints a chilling portrait of burgeoning intolerance in the country. In a blog post delving into Antisemitism Statistics, this statistic serves as potent testament to the escalating severity of the issue. It alerts readers to the alarming pace at which such instances are multiplying across the globe, making them cognizant of the darkening climate of antisemitism. Such awareness can instigate critical discussions and foster actionable initiatives to combat this deep-rooted prejudice.

In 2019, approximately 50% of Italian Jews have experienced or witnessed antisemitic episodes.

Highlighting the striking statistic that in 2019, about half of all Italian Jews were exposed to or encountered antisemitic incidents paints a sobering picture of the severity of antisemitism in Italy. This significant percentage provides a stark reminder that antisemitism still exists in modern societies, impacting individual community members directly. It serves as a necessary focal point for discussions and strategies needed to counteract such prejudice, making it an essential inclusion in any comprehensive conversation on the scale and consequences of antisemitism via statistical analysis.

According to ADL in 2020, 54% of Jewish adults in America have either experienced or heard antisemitic comments, slurs or threats.

Highlighting the statistic that in 2020, 54% of Jewish adults in America endured or overheard antisemitic comments, slurs or threats – as reported by the ADL – paints a stark portrait of the prevalence and persistence of antisemitism within the U.S. Dramatically illuminating the ocean of prejudice many Jewish individuals navigate daily, this figure serves as a potent reminder of the urgent need for societal change. In an Antisemitism Statistics blog post, this particular statistic is a critical narrative pivot, indicative of deep-seated biases that crack the facade of societal progress, undeniably vital in driving home the magnitude of the issue at hand.

In 2020, there were 2,024 recorded antisemitic incidents in the UK, the third highest annual total on record.

The resonation of the alarming number of 2,024 recorded antisemitic incidents in the UK in 2020, standing as the third highest annual total on record, gravely underscores the urgency and depth of the antisemitism problem. In the labyrinth of Antisemitism Statistics, this figure emerges as a chilling benchmark, validating concerns about the unrelenting assault of antisemitic perspectives and actions, and rallying a call for united, proactive steps towards eradicating this deep-seated malice. It also establishes a compelling backdrop for dissent and dialogue, highlighting the dire need for cultural education, monitoring, and stricter legal sanctions to curb this societal ill.

Conclusion

Based on the antisemitism statistics evaluated in this blog post, it is evident that antisemitism remains a pervasive issue worldwide. The escalating trends in various countries not only signal alarming concern but also mandate immediate action to address this phenomenon. A comprehensive understanding of these statistics is crucial as the first step towards devising effective strategies to combat this deep-set prejudice. Society as a whole must work together to ensure a drastic reduction in these disturbing figures and foster a world more accepting and respectful of Jewish communities.

References

0. – https://www.www.ecaj.org.au

1. – https://www.fra.europa.eu

2. – https://www.www.spssi.org

3. – https://www.www.daia.org.ar

4. – https://www.www150.statcan.gc.ca

5. – https://www.www.pewresearch.org

6. – https://www.www.dw.com

7. – https://www.www.adl.org

8. – https://www.moked.it

9. – https://www.www.ajc.org

10. – https://www.www.fondationshoah.org

11. – https://www.www.antisemitism.org.uk

12. – https://www.cst.org.uk

FAQs

What is Antisemitism?

Antisemitism is the hostility to, prejudice, or discrimination against Jews as a religious, ethnic, or racial group.

What are the historical origins of Antisemitism?

Antisemitism's roots can be traced back to ancient times. The Romans and Egyptians harbored negative attitudes toward Jews for their distinctive monotheistic beliefs. The Christian doctrine in Middle Ages sometimes fostered antisemitic beliefs, associating Jews with the death of Jesus.

How did Antisemitism play a role in the Holocaust?

Antisemitism was central to Nazi ideology. It underpinned their belief in racial purity, and fueled their genocidal policies against the Jews during the Holocaust. Approximately six million Jews were systematically murdered by Nazis due to these antisemitic beliefs.

Is Antisemitism a global or localized issue?

Antisemitism is a global issue and is present to varying degrees in many countries. Its manifestation can take various forms such as physical attacks, hate speech, discrimination, and social exclusion.

How can Antisemitism be combat and prevented?

Antisemitism can be combatted through education about the Holocaust, fostering of interfaith dialogue and understanding, strong laws and regulation against hate speech and hate crime, and clear denouncement of antisemitic behavior by community and political leaders.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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