GITNUX REPORT 2024

Global Amphetamines Statistics: 37 Million Users, $13.2B Market, Alarming Trends

Exploring the Dark Reality of Amphetamines: Global Stats Reveal Alarming Trends in Use and Misuse

Author: Jannik Lindner

First published: 7/17/2024

Statistic 1

Amphetamines are the second most widely used illegal drug worldwide after cannabis.

Statistic 2

In 2018, an estimated 37 million people used amphetamines or related stimulants globally.

Statistic 3

Over 10 million Americans age 12 and older reported misusing prescription stimulants like amphetamines in 2019.

Statistic 4

Over 5% of adults in the United States have misused prescription stimulants like amphetamines at least once in their lives.

Statistic 5

Methamphetamine, a type of amphetamine, is the most commonly abused drug in Asia and the Pacific region.

Statistic 6

Around 5% of high school seniors in the U.S. reported using prescription amphetamines without a prescription in 2020.

Statistic 7

The average age of first-time amphetamine use in the U.S. is 18 years old.

Statistic 8

The rate of amphetamine use disorder in the U.S. increased by 100% from 2009 to 2019.

Statistic 9

Over 80% of inmates in U.S. federal prisons who met criteria for substance use disorder reported using amphetamines.

Statistic 10

Australia has one of the highest rates of methamphetamine use in the world.

Statistic 11

The National Survey on Drug Use and Health estimated that around 1.6 million Americans used methamphetamine in 2020.

Statistic 12

In 2019, there were over 12,000 amphetamine-related poisonings reported to U.S. poison control centers.

Statistic 13

Chronic use of amphetamines can lead to neurological and cardiovascular problems, including stroke and seizures.

Statistic 14

Amphetamine-related emergency department visits in the U.S. increased by 51% between 2009 and 2015.

Statistic 15

In 2019, there were over 36,000 drug overdose deaths in the U.S. involving psychostimulants like amphetamines.

Statistic 16

Between 2008 and 2018, the number of annual amphetamine-related overdose deaths in Australia doubled.

Statistic 17

Over 50% of drug overdose deaths involving psychostimulants like amphetamines in the U.S. also involved opioids in 2019.

Statistic 18

Amphetamine misuse is associated with an increased risk of mental health disorders, including depression and anxiety.

Statistic 19

The estimated economic cost of amphetamine abuse in the U.S. is over $20 billion annually.

Statistic 20

The majority of amphetamine-related deaths in the U.S. involve male individuals.

Statistic 21

Amphetamine-related emergency room visits in Canada increased by 45% from 2010 to 2019.

Statistic 22

Amphetamine use during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of low birth weight and developmental delays in the child.

Statistic 23

Over 60% of individuals with amphetamine use disorder in the U.S. have a co-occurring mental health condition.

Statistic 24

Approximately 15% of individuals who misuse prescription stimulants like amphetamines report obtaining them from family or friends for free.

Statistic 25

The use of amphetamines in combination with other substances, such as alcohol, increases the risk of overdose and adverse health effects.

Statistic 26

The global market for prescription stimulants such as amphetamines reached $13.2 billion in 2019.

Statistic 27

The production of amphetamines is a significant source of revenue for organized crime groups globally.

Statistic 28

Methamphetamine continues to be the primary drug threat in the Asia-Pacific region.

Statistic 29

Around 75% of the world's illicit amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) are seized in North America.

Statistic 30

Amphetamines are commonly used as performance-enhancing drugs in sports and are banned by most athletic organizations.

Statistic 31

Over 89,000 kilograms of amphetamines and ATS were seized globally in 2018.

Statistic 32

The average purity of amphetamines seized in Europe increased from 15% in 2010 to over 50% in 2019.

Statistic 33

Amphetamine is listed on the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) list of prohibited substances in sports.

Statistic 34

Methamphetamine seizures in East and Southeast Asia increased by 36% from 2017 to 2018.

Statistic 35

Methamphetamine seizures in Africa increased by 77% from 2018 to 2019.

Statistic 36

The number of amphetamine-related arrests in the U.S. has doubled in the past decade.

Statistic 37

Prescription stimulant misuse among college students in the U.S. is estimated to be around 15%.

Statistic 38

Prescription stimulant misuse among young adults aged 18 to 25 in the U.S. is around 8%.

Statistic 39

Amphetamine misuse is more prevalent among white individuals compared to other racial/ethnic groups in the U.S.

Statistic 40

The average age of individuals seeking treatment for amphetamine use disorder in the U.S. is 29 years old.

Share:FacebookLinkedIn
Sources

Our Reports have been cited by:

Trust Badges

Summary

  • Amphetamines are the second most widely used illegal drug worldwide after cannabis.
  • In 2018, an estimated 37 million people used amphetamines or related stimulants globally.
  • Around 75% of the world's illicit amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) are seized in North America.
  • In 2019, there were over 12,000 amphetamine-related poisonings reported to U.S. poison control centers.
  • Over 10 million Americans age 12 and older reported misusing prescription stimulants like amphetamines in 2019.
  • The global market for prescription stimulants such as amphetamines reached $13.2 billion in 2019.
  • Over 5% of adults in the United States have misused prescription stimulants like amphetamines at least once in their lives.
  • Methamphetamine, a type of amphetamine, is the most commonly abused drug in Asia and the Pacific region.
  • Amphetamines are commonly used as performance-enhancing drugs in sports and are banned by most athletic organizations.
  • Chronic use of amphetamines can lead to neurological and cardiovascular problems, including stroke and seizures.
  • Around 5% of high school seniors in the U.S. reported using prescription amphetamines without a prescription in 2020.
  • The average age of first-time amphetamine use in the U.S. is 18 years old.
  • Amphetamine-related emergency department visits in the U.S. increased by 51% between 2009 and 2015.
  • In 2019, there were over 36,000 drug overdose deaths in the U.S. involving psychostimulants like amphetamines.
  • Between 2008 and 2018, the number of annual amphetamine-related overdose deaths in Australia doubled.

<p>Move over, cannabis &#8211; amphetamines are here to sprint into the spotlight as the worlds second most widely used illegal drug. In 2018 alone, a staggering 37 million people worldwide joined the fast lane of amphetamine and stimulant use, with North America proudly seizing a whopping 75% of the globes illicit supply. From performance enhancement in sports to a soaring $13.2 billion global market for prescription stimulants, the amphetamine buzz is real &#8211; but beware, as the road ahead may lead to neurological twists and cardiovascular turns. With over 89,000 kilograms seized globally and a rapidly rising tide of emergency room visits and overdose deaths, the amphetamine tale packs a potent punch thats anything but a sugar rush. Hold on tight &#8211; this isnt your average energy boost.</p>

Amphetamine Usage Statistics

  • Amphetamines are the second most widely used illegal drug worldwide after cannabis.
  • In 2018, an estimated 37 million people used amphetamines or related stimulants globally.
  • Over 10 million Americans age 12 and older reported misusing prescription stimulants like amphetamines in 2019.
  • Over 5% of adults in the United States have misused prescription stimulants like amphetamines at least once in their lives.
  • Methamphetamine, a type of amphetamine, is the most commonly abused drug in Asia and the Pacific region.
  • Around 5% of high school seniors in the U.S. reported using prescription amphetamines without a prescription in 2020.
  • The average age of first-time amphetamine use in the U.S. is 18 years old.
  • The rate of amphetamine use disorder in the U.S. increased by 100% from 2009 to 2019.
  • Over 80% of inmates in U.S. federal prisons who met criteria for substance use disorder reported using amphetamines.
  • Australia has one of the highest rates of methamphetamine use in the world.
  • The National Survey on Drug Use and Health estimated that around 1.6 million Americans used methamphetamine in 2020.

Interpretation

Ah, it seems the world has developed quite the zesty taste for amphetamines, making them the second most sought-after illegal drug globally after our green friend, cannabis. With over 37 million global users in 2018, it's clear that these stimulants are not just for early morning risers anymore. From over 10 million Americans delighting in prescription stimulant misuse in 2019 to the alarming 100% increase in amphetamine use disorder in the U.S. from 2009 to 2019, it appears that the amphetamine craze shows no signs of slowing down. So, whether you're popping pills illegally in high school or enjoying the meth scene Down Under, one thing's for certain: amphetamines are giving a whole new meaning to the term 'up and coming' in the world of illicit substances.

Amphetamine-Related Health Risks

  • In 2019, there were over 12,000 amphetamine-related poisonings reported to U.S. poison control centers.
  • Chronic use of amphetamines can lead to neurological and cardiovascular problems, including stroke and seizures.
  • Amphetamine-related emergency department visits in the U.S. increased by 51% between 2009 and 2015.
  • In 2019, there were over 36,000 drug overdose deaths in the U.S. involving psychostimulants like amphetamines.
  • Between 2008 and 2018, the number of annual amphetamine-related overdose deaths in Australia doubled.
  • Over 50% of drug overdose deaths involving psychostimulants like amphetamines in the U.S. also involved opioids in 2019.
  • Amphetamine misuse is associated with an increased risk of mental health disorders, including depression and anxiety.
  • The estimated economic cost of amphetamine abuse in the U.S. is over $20 billion annually.
  • The majority of amphetamine-related deaths in the U.S. involve male individuals.
  • Amphetamine-related emergency room visits in Canada increased by 45% from 2010 to 2019.
  • Amphetamine use during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of low birth weight and developmental delays in the child.
  • Over 60% of individuals with amphetamine use disorder in the U.S. have a co-occurring mental health condition.
  • Approximately 15% of individuals who misuse prescription stimulants like amphetamines report obtaining them from family or friends for free.
  • The use of amphetamines in combination with other substances, such as alcohol, increases the risk of overdose and adverse health effects.

Interpretation

Amphetamines: the drug that keeps on giving, but not in a good way. With a laundry list of alarming statistics showcasing the detrimental effects of their misuse, it seems these little pills pack a mighty, and deadly, punch. With poisonings, emergency visits, and overdose deaths on the rise, it's clear that amphetamines aren't just a high-flying party drug, they're a serious public health concern. From neurological woes to a skyrocketing economic toll, the cost of this "speedy" habit is nothing to sniff at. So, next time someone offers you a little pick-me-up in the form of an amphetamine, just say no thanks - your brain, heart, and overall well-being will thank you later.

Global Market Trends

  • The global market for prescription stimulants such as amphetamines reached $13.2 billion in 2019.
  • The production of amphetamines is a significant source of revenue for organized crime groups globally.
  • Methamphetamine continues to be the primary drug threat in the Asia-Pacific region.

Interpretation

The booming $13.2 billion global market for prescription stimulants like amphetamines showcases the insatiable demand for these drugs, with organized crime groups cashing in on the lucrative production trade. Despite their thrilling profits, amphetamines are showcasing a darker side as methamphetamine maintains its menacing hold on the Asia-Pacific region, posing a grave threat not just to individuals, but to the fabric of society itself. It seems that the highs of this market may come with a sobering cost that society cannot afford to ignore.

Law Enforcement and Seizures

  • Around 75% of the world's illicit amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) are seized in North America.
  • Amphetamines are commonly used as performance-enhancing drugs in sports and are banned by most athletic organizations.
  • Over 89,000 kilograms of amphetamines and ATS were seized globally in 2018.
  • The average purity of amphetamines seized in Europe increased from 15% in 2010 to over 50% in 2019.
  • Amphetamine is listed on the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) list of prohibited substances in sports.
  • Methamphetamine seizures in East and Southeast Asia increased by 36% from 2017 to 2018.
  • Methamphetamine seizures in Africa increased by 77% from 2018 to 2019.
  • The number of amphetamine-related arrests in the U.S. has doubled in the past decade.

Interpretation

In a world where the quest for peak performance knows no bounds, the statistics on amphetamines paint a vivid picture of a society wired for success at any cost. With North America leading the charge in illicit stimulant seizures, it's clear that the drive for enhancement transcends borders. From sports fields to dark alleys, the allure of amphetamines is undeniable, as evidenced by the exponential rise in global seizures. As purity levels spike in Europe, and methamphetamine spreads its grip across Asia and Africa, the tale of these stimulants becomes one of escalating highs and deepening lows. In the midst of this frenzy, one thing is certain - the pursuit of excellence has a dark side, one that law enforcement and anti-doping agencies are racing to contain as amphetamine-related arrests multiply.

Sociodemographic Patterns

  • Prescription stimulant misuse among college students in the U.S. is estimated to be around 15%.
  • Prescription stimulant misuse among young adults aged 18 to 25 in the U.S. is around 8%.
  • Amphetamine misuse is more prevalent among white individuals compared to other racial/ethnic groups in the U.S.
  • The average age of individuals seeking treatment for amphetamine use disorder in the U.S. is 29 years old.

Interpretation

In a country where "keeping up with the Joneses" has turned into "keeping up with your Adderall prescription," it seems that stimulant misuse is on the rise, particularly among college students and young adults. With amphetamine misuse disproportionately affecting white individuals, it appears that the pressure to excel and succeed knows no color. Strikingly, the average age of those seeking treatment for amphetamine use disorder is a not-so-tender 29 years old, showing that the pursuit of high-octane success can sometimes veer off course. Stay alert, fellow Americans, the quick fix may not always be the right fix.

References