GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Amphetamines Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Amphetamines Statistics

  • In 2019, 1.9 million people reported using amphetamines in the past year.
  • In 2020, around 35.4 million people worldwide had used amphetamines and prescription stimulants.
  • The global Amphetamine-Type Stimulants market size was valued at USD 3.04 Billion in 2020.
  • Males (3.2%) are more likely than females (2.5%) to have used amphetamines in the past year.
  • Among those seeking treatment for amphetamine use, the average age of first use was 18.5 years old.
  • Every year around 32,000 kg of amphetamine are seized around the world.
  • In 2019, 8% of those in treatment for drug dependency were there because of amphetamines.
  • Among young adults aged 18 to 25 in the U.S., 3.1% reported current nonmedical use of Adderall, an amphetamine drug.
  • Amphetamines were involved in 12,676 overdose deaths in the United States in 2019.
  • 70% of methamphetamine users are considered dependent on the drug.
  • From 2015 to 2018, among adults aged 18-64 years, methamphetamine/amphetamine-related visits accounted for nearly 1% of Emergency Department visits.
  • UK hospital admissions with a primary diagnosis of drug-related mental and behavioral disorders due to use of amphetamines have seen a 17% rise since 2012-2013.
  • In Western Europe, over 2 million people used amphetamines in 2018.
  • As of 2020, around 52 million people aged 15–64 had used amphetamines in the past year worldwide.
  • In the U.S., the estimated economic cost of methamphetamine use reached $23.4 billion in 2005.
  • It is estimated that 5.5% of 11-16-year-olds in Australia have used amphetamines.
  • According to UNODC, amphetamine seizures have been raising in the Middle East, with seizures in Saudi Arabia increased by 424% from 2010 to 2015.
  • An estimated 6%, or about 2 million, of the 2018 full-time college student population in the U.S. reported past-year use of Adderall, an amphetamine.
  • 48.8% of those using amphetamines in Australia also consume alcohol, thereby increasing health risks.
  • In 2020, more than 67,000 people died from drug overdoses in America, with synthetic opioids and amphetamines being the main drugs involved.

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Understanding the true scale, nuances, and impacts of amphetamine use requires a close examination of relevant statistics. As a globally recognized stimulant, amphetamines have found their place in both medical prescriptions and the illicit drug market, affecting a wide demographic. This blog delves into comprehensive data on amphetamine usage, exploring the breadth and depth of the issue from prevalence rates, age group characteristics, geographical hotspots, health consequences, to societal implications. By presenting current and research-backed statistics, we aim to foster a well-informed perspective on the consequences and complexities of amphetamine use.

The Latest Amphetamines Statistics Unveiled

In 2019, 1.9 million people reported using amphetamines in the past year.

Diving head first into the swirling currents of the amphetamine crisis, the astonishing figure of 1.9 million individuals reporting usage in 2019 alone unveils a harsh reality. This figure not only shines a searing light on the shackles of addiction that bind a staggering level of our population, but it also sets a daunting stage for the ensuing discourse. As a stark reminder of the widespread and pressing nature of amphetamine misuse, it directs our focus towards the urgency of enacting effective strategies for prevention, treatment, and public education, thereby steering the direction and intensity of the conversation in our blog post on Amphetamine Statistics.

In 2020, around 35.4 million people worldwide had used amphetamines and prescription stimulants.

Grasping the global magnitude of amphetamine and prescription stimulant use, quantified at about 35.4 million people in 2020, underlines the pervasive reach of these substances, crossing borders, cultures, and societies. This figure not only has significant implications for public health and policy-making efforts, but also plays a critical role in shaping the conversation through data-driven awareness. It illuminatively punctuates the necessity for comprehensive and contextual understanding of drug use patterns, unmasking the vestiges of an immense challenge. This number is not only a mere statistic, but it morphs into a story of humanity, reflecting an intricate web of personal journeys, societal issues and the scale of global intervention necessary.

The global Amphetamine-Type Stimulants market size was valued at USD 3.04 Billion in 2020.

Taking into account last year’s valuation of the global Amphetamine-Type Stimulants market at a striking USD 3.04 billion places into stark relief the pervasive influence and significant economic impact of these substances. By distilling the scale of financial involvement, this figure sharpens our understanding of the widespread consumption patterns, indicates the striking extent of profitability stimulating continual production and trafficking, and underscores the critical importance of informed, targeted strategies—touching on realms from public health to law enforcement—for addressing the multi-faceted challenges embedded in this high-stakes landscape.

Males (3.2%) are more likely than females (2.5%) to have used amphetamines in the past year.

In the realm of Amphetamines usage, there is a discernible gender gap, with males at a 3.2% usage rate per annum, surpassing females who stand at 2.5%. Unfolding further nuance to the narrative, it is imperative to consider how societal, biological, and psychological factors might fuel this disparity. This difference may cast light onto distinct behavioral patterns, risk factors, treatment needs and prevention strategies for males and females. Thus, it invites broader discussions and research into understanding the factors propelling this trend, bringing us a step closer to tailored interventions.

Among those seeking treatment for amphetamine use, the average age of first use was 18.5 years old.

In the grand scheme of uncovering the realities surrounding amphetamine usage, an illuminating piece of detail is that the average age of initial use among those seeking treatment stands at 18.5 years old. This figure plays a pivotal role in our understanding as it underscores the juncture at which individuals are first exposed to these substances—often during their formative, adolescent years. Recognizing this number injects urgency into the necessity for earlier intervention, education, and preventative measures targeting this vulnerable demographic. It brings forth a somber reminder that the grip of amphetamines takes hold from a relatively tender age, influencing the trajectory of an individual’s life-course, and thereby setting the premise for an evidence-based discourse on amphetamine usage patterns and their subsequent social and health ramifications.

Every year around 32,000 kg of amphetamine are seized around the world.

Unearthing the staggering figure of approximately 32,000 kg of amphetamines intercepted globally each year paints a shocking portrait of the vast underground trade in these illicit substances. This snapshot not only attests to the extensive efforts of law enforcement in curbing this menace but also reflects the rampant demand and widespread use of amphetamines. It underscores the need for continual vigilance and intervention strategies, as well as heightened awareness and education about the severe health risks and societal costs associated with amphetamine misuse. This alarming statistic serves as a valuable wake-up call and benchmark for measuring our progress in the ongoing battle against the global amphetamine problem.

In 2019, 8% of those in treatment for drug dependency were there because of amphetamines.

The unveiled figure that, in 2019, 8% of those in treatment for drug dependency were grappling with amphetamines underlines an eye-opening truth. It punctuates the wider issue of amphetamines abuse entwined within our society, while highlighting the compelling need for broader outreach and comprehensive care strategies. The numerical perspective articulated by this statistic equips us with a deeper understanding of the drug landscape, invaluable to those crafting policies and delivering amphetamine-related interventions. Essentially, such figures flesh out the true magnitude and severity of amphetamines affliction, acting as a crucial reference point within the broader discussion of Amphetamines Statistics portrayed in the blog post.

Among young adults aged 18 to 25 in the U.S., 3.1% reported current nonmedical use of Adderall, an amphetamine drug.

In the landscape of a blog post focusing on Amphetamine Statistics, the revelation that 3.1% of U.S. young adults aged 18 to 25 report current nonmedical use of Adderall casts a spotlight on an underlying issue. This particular statistic draws our attention towards the alarming trend of prescription drug misuse among young society. It raises implicative questions about the pervasive misuse of these substances, the ease of obtaining them, and most importantly, the inherent health risks and potential societal implications. This statistic works as a wake-up call, encouraging us to explore and understand the deeper layers of Amphetamine misuse and to initiate proactive measures for harm reduction.

Amphetamines were involved in 12,676 overdose deaths in the United States in 2019.

The alarming figure of 12,676 overdose deaths linked to amphetamines in the United States in 2019 illuminates the lethal consequences of these substances, serving as a stark testament of their life-threatening impact. These statistics paint a most compelling picture for the readers of the blog post on Amphetamines Statistics, highlighting the urgency and importance of increased awareness, policy intervention, and prevention efforts. It serves as a grim testimony, underscoring the intertwined narrative of human lives lost and the profound social implications associated with the misuse of amphetamines.

70% of methamphetamine users are considered dependent on the drug.

Highlighting that 70% of methamphetamine users are dependent on the drug serves as a stark reminder of the substance’s potent addictiveness in our blog post about Amphetamines Statistics. It underscores the detrimental impact methamphetamines have on individuals’ autonomy, health and overall well-being. This critical percentage provides invaluable insights for healthcare professionals, policymakers, and society at large, by painting a vivid picture of the urgency and scope needed in prevention efforts, treatment approaches, and policy formation. It is not merely a statistic, but a call for comprehensive, sustained, and proactive responses to this public health crisis.

From 2015 to 2018, among adults aged 18-64 years, methamphetamine/amphetamine-related visits accounted for nearly 1% of Emergency Department visits.

Diving deep into the haunting shadow of amphetamine abuse, the statistic that nearly 1% of Emergency Department visits from 2015 to 2018 among adults aged 18-64 years were related to methamphetamine/amphetamine, unfolds a grim narrative. In the context of a blog post about Amphetamines Statistics, this statistic serves as a powerful reminder of the escalating public health crisis propelled by these substances. Notably, it highlights the immense strain placed on crucial healthcare services by amphetamine-related incidents and the pervasive societal toll of amphetamine pervasion and misuse. This metric encourages further reflection on preventative measures and health policies that are vital in curbing the dangerous tide of amphetamine abuse.

UK hospital admissions with a primary diagnosis of drug-related mental and behavioral disorders due to use of amphetamines have seen a 17% rise since 2012-2013.

Spotlighting the silent yet significant rise in UK hospital admissions due to amphetamine-related mental and behavioral disorders, now 17% higher compared to the baseline year of 2012-2013, sets an alarming tone in the discussion around amphetamines usage and its societal impact. Within the narrative of amphetamines statistics, these numbers amplify the hidden crisis wrapped around increased drug use, having a direct causal link to escalating healthcare burdens and mental health challenges. This uptick underscores the importance of preventive interventions, rehabilitative measures, and policy-making efforts to curb the escalating trajectory of amphetamine-related health issues.

In Western Europe, over 2 million people used amphetamines in 2018.

Highlighting that over 2 million people consumed amphetamines in Western Europe in 2018 provides a sobering reality of the extent of amphetamine use across the region. In the discourse of Amphetamines Statistics, this figure is a critical pivot point that underscores the urgency to address this prevalent issue. It not only rounds out the understanding of the spread of this habit but also pushes the envelope on initiating policy changes, raising awareness, and planning prevention strategies to curb such addictive substance use, considering its detriments to public health, economic productivity, and social harmony.

As of 2020, around 52 million people aged 15–64 had used amphetamines in the past year worldwide.

Illuminating the global consumption of amphetamines, the figure of 52 million users aged 15–64 as of 2020 offers a stark revelation about this prevailing issue. This statistic underpins the extensive reach and impact of amphetamines on various demographics, highlighting a growing international concern. The significance of this statistic in the wider amphetamine narrative manifests in its explicit representation of the drug’s pervasiveness, which necessitates further exploration into its use patterns, the associated health risks, and the crucial need for targeted preventive measures. Confronting this reality marks a pivotal step in creating an informed discourse on amphetamines, a critical component in shaping effective socio-political responses and strategies.

In the U.S., the estimated economic cost of methamphetamine use reached $23.4 billion in 2005.

Highlighting the staggering financial burden of $23.4 billion on the U.S economy due to methamphetamine use in 2005 underscores the severity of the amphetamine crisis penetrating deeply into our societal structures. Such an astronomical figure encapsulates not only the direct costs linked to healthcare and law enforcement, but also hidden impacts like loss of productivity and related societal ills. In the ecosystem of amphetamine statistics, this aspect adds another perspective demonstrating the tangible economic consequences provoked by the drug, thus painting a holistic picture of the issue.

It is estimated that 5.5% of 11-16-year-olds in Australia have used amphetamines.

In navigating the vast sea of Amphetamines statistics, one chilling iceberg comes into view; an estimated 5.5% of Australian adolescents between 11-16 years have experienced amphetamine use. This number shines a harsh spotlight on the burgeoning issue of drug misuse within this specific age group, surfacing its relevance and urgency. These troubling figures aren’t just digits on a page, they echo the untold struggles of a demographic alarmingly being seduced into the dark world of drugs, and poignantly underline the need for increased awareness, regulation, and action. The significance of this figure lies in its potential to initiate a wake-up call, driving us to explore effective interventions, drug education and support mechanisms to defend our future generations.

According to UNODC, amphetamine seizures have been raising in the Middle East, with seizures in Saudi Arabia increased by 424% from 2010 to 2015.

As we delve into amphetamines statistics, it is critical to shed light on the alarming trends highlighted by UNODC data, which underscores a drastic surge in amphetamine seizures in the Middle East, especially in Saudi Arabia. There has been a jaw-dropping increase of 424% in seizures from 2010 to 2015. This ascent is not only indicative of the expanding amphetamine black market and drug trafficking issue in this region, but also mirrors the burgeoning demand and abuse of amphetamines. As such, this profound escalation commands global attention as it has significant implications for public health, law enforcement, and drug policy.

An estimated 6%, or about 2 million, of the 2018 full-time college student population in the U.S. reported past-year use of Adderall, an amphetamine.

Highlighting a pivotal aspect of Amphetamine prevalence in America,
the figure delineates that an alarming 6% of the full-time student population, translating to roughly 2 million individuals, acknowledged using Adderall, a form of amphetamine, in 2018. In a landscape where the pressures and expectations surrounding academic performance are skyrocketing, this data sheds an incisive light on one of the clandestine coping mechanisms students resort to. It underscores the gravity of the situation, indicating an urgent need for increased awareness and stronger deterrent measures, and makes a compelling case for further research and intervention in this domain.

48.8% of those using amphetamines in Australia also consume alcohol, thereby increasing health risks.

In unraveling the intricately woven tapestry of amphetamines usage in Australia, one may stumble upon a striking thread: a staggering 48.8% of amphetamine users concurrently consume alcohol, ramping up their health risks significantly. This figure serves as a stark reminder of the corrosive influence of substance mélange, laying down the gauntlet for intensified public health campaigns. To dissect the enigma of amphetamine abuse, it is imperative to scrutinize the role of such dangerous co-consumption patterns. It adorns our blog post with an insightful dimension, underpinning the urgency of adopting a holistic view on tackling drug abuse, and not merely focusing on singular drug use.

In 2020, more than 67,000 people died from drug overdoses in America, with synthetic opioids and amphetamines being the main drugs involved.

The glaring figure of 67,000 American lives claimed by drug overdoses in 2020 sets an important backdrop for a profound examination on the issue of Amphetamines misuse. The revelation that synthetic opioids and amphetamines form the crux of this overdose crisis underscores the urgency needed in addressing the situation, and significantly, amplifies the focal point of our blog post on Amphetamine statistics. As such, this piece will delve into the sheer impact of amphetamines consumption, illustrating not only its increasing prevalence but also how it’s entangled in the alarming increase of drug-induced fatalities.

Conclusion

The alarming statistics surrounding amphetamine use are a powerful call to action. High prevalence rates, particularly among young adults, coupled with harmful health effects and potential for abuse, point to a serious public health issue. This necessitates increased efforts in educational campaigns, addiction support, and healthcare measures to mitigate its impacts. Therefore, understanding and keeping up-to-date with these statistical trends is crucial in shaping public policy to address this ongoing crisis effectively.

References

0. – https://www.digital.nhs.uk

1. – https://www.www.emergenresearch.com

2. – https://www.www.rand.org

3. – https://www.www.aihw.gov.au

4. – https://www.wdr.unodc.org

5. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

6. – https://www.www.drugabuse.gov

7. – https://www.www.samhsa.gov

8. – https://www.www.emcdda.europa.eu

9. – https://www.www.unodc.org

10. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

FAQs

What are amphetamines?

Amphetamines are a type of stimulant drug, which means they speed up the messages traveling between the brain and the body. They can treat conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy.

What are the potential side effects of amphetamines?

Common side effects of amphetamines include increased heart rate and blood pressure, elevated mood or euphoria, enhanced alertness and concentration, and decreased appetite. Prolonged use can lead to severe health issues such as heart problems, mental disorders like paranoia, and physical dependence.

How prevalent is amphetamine use?

The prevalence of amphetamine use varies widely. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, approximately 1% of the global population used amphetamines in the past year. This figure does not include therapeutic use.

What is the legal status of amphetamines?

The legal status of amphetamines varies by country. In many places, including the United States, amphetamines are classed as Schedule II drugs under the Controlled Substances Act, meaning they have a high potential for abuse but are approved for medical uses with severe restrictions.

Can one develop tolerance and dependence on amphetamines?

Yes, frequent use of amphetamines can lead to tolerance, meaning you need to take more of the drug to experience the same effects. Over time, this can lead to dependence, where the body requires the drug to function normally. Dependence often contributes to the cycle of addiction.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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