GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Amphetamine Abuse Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Amphetamine Abuse Statistics

  • According to a 2017 survey, nearly 1.6 million people aged 12 and older were current users of methamphetamine (a type of amphetamine).
  • In 2019, 23% of the drug overdose deaths in the U.S. involved methamphetamine.
  • In 2018, amphetamines were involved in over 12,000 overdose deaths in the United States.
  • The counties of Appalachia saw a 3,000% increase in charges related to methamphetamine from 2011 to 2017.
  • In 2018, 60% of federal drug offenses in the West Central region of the U.S. involved methamphetamine.
  • In Europe, about 1.3 million young adults (aged 15-34) reported having used amphetamine or methamphetamine in the last year (2017).
  • 2017 saw an 18% increase in Amphetamine-related hospital admissions.
  • Between 2010 to 2019, the number of individuals reporting methamphetamine use at the time of their arrest rose from 17.2% to 39.8%.
  • Misuse of prescription stimulants among 12th graders has hovered around 5 to 6 percent since tracking began in 2001.
  • In both 2016 and 2017, about 15,000 drug-poisoning deaths involved psychostimulants such as amphetamines.
  • Between 2007 and 2017, recovery admissions for methamphetamine multiplied by 4.67 times nationwide.
  • In 2017, 964,000 people aged 12 or older had a methamphetamine use disorder.
  • The fastest-growing group of meth users in the U.S. are African-Americans aged 18 to 25.
  • In 2020, 78% of crystal meth in the US came through the San Diego border from Mexico.
  • In San Francisco, 47% of people who entered the city's largest needle program in 2018 reported speed (meth) as their primary drug.
  • The Ready to Change program in Stockholm has reported that 70% of steroid users also use amphetamine.
  • In Australia, between 2010–11 and 2015–16, the number of amphetamine-related hospitalizations increased 150%.

Table of Contents

Amphetamine abuse is a growing concern across the globe, posing significant health and societal implications. As a powerful stimulant, amphetamines carry a high dependency risk, leading many individuals down the precarious path of addiction and misuse. This blog post will delve into the alarming statistics surrounding amphetamine abuse, exposing the far-reaching scale of this epidemic. We aim to shed light on the prevalence, demographic patterns, associated dangers, and consequences of this widespread issue, in an effort to inform, educate, and ideally, prevent further substance abuse.

The Latest Amphetamine Abuse Statistics Unveiled

According to a 2017 survey, nearly 1.6 million people aged 12 and older were current users of methamphetamine (a type of amphetamine).

Highlighting the alarming figure, the 2017 survey insightfully unveils an underbelly of the menace of Amphetamine abuse. It vividly illustrates that a whopping 1.6 million individuals, as young as 12, are currently embroiled in the dangerous grip of methamphetamine usage. This statistic dramatically underscores the severity and scope of the problem across different age groups, sparking a sense of urgency for preventative measures and rehabilitative interventions. It allows us to grasp the gravity of the situation, motivating us to decelerate this escalating trend for a healthier society through our blog post.

In 2019, 23% of the drug overdose deaths in the U.S. involved methamphetamine.

Delving into the realm of Amphetamine abuse statistics paints a distressing picture, particularly when considering the stark claim that methamphetamine was implicated in 23% of U.S. drug overdose deaths in 2019. This potent statistic underscores the grim reality of methamphetamine, a type of amphetamine, propensity for lethal outcomes. Moreover, it heightens the gravity of the amphetamine abuse situation, revealing the drug’s devastating toll on life, and urging for urgent attention towards effective and comprehensive awareness, prevention, and treatment strategies in our fight against this life-shattering issue.

In 2018, amphetamines were involved in over 12,000 overdose deaths in the United States.

Delineating a stark reality, the statistic that over 12,000 overdose deaths in the U.S. in 2018 were attributed to amphetamines underscores the alarming magnitude of amphetamine abuse. It lends a sobering perspective into the perilous arena of this rampant addiction, painting a devastating picture of its lethal consequences. Invoking an iterative understanding of the issue, it positions itself as an insightful touchstone resonating the urgency and pressing nature of addressing amphetamine abuse. It not only places the discourse of amphetamine abuse in the spotlight but also amplifies the need for robust preventive strategies, awareness initiatives, and targeted therapeutic interventions.

The counties of Appalachia saw a 3,000% increase in charges related to methamphetamine from 2011 to 2017.

The statistic detailing a 3,000% rise in charges associated with methamphetamine in Appalachian counties from 2011 to 2017 underscores the escalating seriousness of amphetamine abuse in this region. It acts as a potent barometer of the deep-seated drug problem facing these communities, demonstrating the rapid increase in both illegal drug activity and law enforcement’s efforts to combat it. The breadth of time allows for a clear and comprehensive understanding of the progression of this drug epidemic, providing compelling context within the broader dialogue on amphetamine misuse statistics, and highlighting the dire need for effective policy-making and interventions.

In 2018, 60% of federal drug offenses in the West Central region of the U.S. involved methamphetamine.

Highlighting the statistic ‘In 2018, 60% of federal drug offenses in the West Central region of the U.S. involved methamphetamine’ provides deep insight into the intensity of the amphetamine crisis and underlines the substantive reason for concern. This dynamic facet of the storyline vividly sketches a disturbing image of the escalating methamphetamine-related offenses in the West Central U.S., reinforcing the urgency for detailed exploration, and comprehensive understanding of amphetamine abuse statistics. Indirectly, it pushes the reader to acknowledge the scale of the problem, stimulating their curiosity to delve deeper into the issue, henceforth supporting the theme of the blog post.

In Europe, about 1.3 million young adults (aged 15-34) reported having used amphetamine or methamphetamine in the last year (2017).

Illuminating the darker corners of the European youth experience, the revelation that approximately 1.3 million young adults (aged 15-34) admitted to using amphetamines or methamphetamines in 2017 underscores the sobering reality of substance reliance in this demographic. This staggering figure shines a spotlight on the pervasive and perilous relationship between European youth and these potentially devastating stimulants. It clarifies the scope of the challenge at hand, offering scale and perspective, thereby painting the daunting picture of an issue that is more than a collection of individual stories but a shared societal crisis. In a blog about amphetamine abuse statistics, this insight doesn’t just enrich the narrative—it fuels the urgency for action.

2017 saw an 18% increase in Amphetamine-related hospital admissions.

Highlighting the fact that 2017 witnessed an 18% surge in hospital admissions directly related to Amphetamine usage serves as a red flag waving high on a stark landscape. Amidst a sea of figures in a blog post dissecting Amphetamine Abuse Statistics, this particular statistic acts as an eerie beacon, casting light on the escalating health crisis. It is the numerical embodiment of thousands of real-life stories, painting a somber portrait of the escalating battle against drug misuse, reinforcing the severity of the situation and the urgent need for targeted intervention strategies.

Between 2010 to 2019, the number of individuals reporting methamphetamine use at the time of their arrest rose from 17.2% to 39.8%.

Highlighting the significant surge from 17.2% to 39.8% in the span of just one decade, the statistic unveils the alarming progression of methamphetamine use among those apprehended by law enforcement. This escalation underpins the intensifying crisis of Amphetamine abuse, shedding light on the disturbing prevalence of addiction and the downstream societal repercussions, such as crime. The sharp rise is a stark testament to the urgency for increased preventive measures and more effective treatment strategies, that the blog post aims to address through in-depth exploration of Amphetamine Abuse Statistics.

Misuse of prescription stimulants among 12th graders has hovered around 5 to 6 percent since tracking began in 2001.

The revealing statistic that “misuse of prescription stimulants among 12th graders has hovered around 5 to 6 percent since tracking began in 2001” serves as a significant touchstone in unraveling the broad narrative of amphetamine abuse. Acting as a clear testimony, it underlines the enduring nature of this issue within a specific, youthful demographic, signaling the considerable health and societal implications. This knowledge is instrumental in understanding the scope of amphetamine misuse, aiding to craft prevention strategies, and spark discussions about safer prescription practices and better education around the potential for substance abuse.

In both 2016 and 2017, about 15,000 drug-poisoning deaths involved psychostimulants such as amphetamines.

Highlighting the statistic that points to the staggering 15,000 drug-poisoning deaths involving psychostimulants like amphetamines in both 2016 and 2017, adds a strikingly grim reality check to the narrative in the blog post about Amphetamine Abuse Statistics. It underscores the lethal outcome of amphetamine abuse, providing compelling numerical evidence that the misuse of such substances has severe and often fatal implications. This chilling fact illuminates the real-world severity of amphetamine abuse, emphasizing the urgent need for preventative measures, greater awareness, and stronger drug regulations.

Between 2007 and 2017, recovery admissions for methamphetamine multiplied by 4.67 times nationwide.

Grounded in the alarming figures of escalating methamphetamine recovery admits from the previous decade, it’s evident that this substance’s misuse is wreaking havoc on an expanding scale. The near five-fold surge in admissions from 2007 to 2017 highlights an aggressive upward trend, reinforcing the gravity and urgency of addressing amphetamine abuse. In weaving this into the dialogue on amphetamine abuse statistics, it juxtaposes the critical need for increased prevention efforts, availability and accessibility of effective treatment options against the backdrop of an intensifying societal issue. This statistic serves as a sobering alert of the breadth and depth that amphetamine abuse has attained nationally.

In 2017, 964,000 people aged 12 or older had a methamphetamine use disorder.

The startling figure of 964,000 individuals, aged 12 or older, grappling with a methamphetamine use disorder in 2017 paints a striking picture of the widespread impact of amphetamine abuse. It emphasizes the widespread prevalence of this crisis, extending across ages and backgrounds, and underlines the urgency to address amphetamine misuse. Interpreting this metric in the context of a blog post on Amphetamine Abuse Statistics not only illustrates a concerning reality of large-scale substance abuse, but also underscores a societal challenge that calls for targeted intervention strategies, improved rehabilitation programs and increased awareness efforts.

The fastest-growing group of meth users in the U.S. are African-Americans aged 18 to 25.

Highlighting the staggering increase among African-Americans, specifically those aged 18-25, in the realm of meth users in the U.S., serves as a potent wake-up call. It throws a spotlight on pressing socio-ethnic aspects of amphetamine abuse which may otherwise go unnoticed. Foregrounding these figures fuels a critical dialogue about wider social, economic and racial factors that may be fostering an environment conducive to substance abuse. This perspective aids in tailoring specific interventions – prevention strategies, public health initiatives, and policy changes – to curb the growth of this alarming trend in the said demographic.

In 2020, 78% of crystal meth in the US came through the San Diego border from Mexico.

The distribution, accessibility, and origins of drugs are crucial elements when educating our audience about Amphetamine abuse patterns tracked across the United States. A compelling data point that shines a light on these patterns is the fact that in 2020, the San Diego border became a significant gateway for crystal meth, with 78% of the drug found in the US passing through this point from Mexico. This undeniable connection puts a spotlight on international influences and illicit trade routes that contribute to the substance abuse problems domestically, which becomes a crucial aspect of designing targeted interventions and policies to curb amphetamine misuse, particularly crystal meth.

In San Francisco, 47% of people who entered the city’s largest needle program in 2018 reported speed (meth) as their primary drug.

Highlighting the compelling statistic from San Francisco’s largest needle program showcases the gripping intensity of amphetamine, specifically meth, abuse consuming nearly half of its participants in 2018. This serves as a tangible illustration of the escalating grip meth addiction holds on urban communities, strengthening the empirical evidence of amphetamine abuse. The statistic underscores the urgency and gravity of the issue, demonstrating that controlling and reducing meth addiction must be a high priority not only in San Francisco, but potentially in comparable urban environments wrestling with similar drug scourges.

The Ready to Change program in Stockholm has reported that 70% of steroid users also use amphetamine.

Delving into the depths of Amphetamine Abuse Statistics, the revelation that a staggering 70% of steroid users, monitored under Stockholm’s Ready to Change program, concurrently use amphetamine yields a startling revelation. It showcases a disconcerting trend of dual drug abuse, hinting at how these two substance dependencies could be interconnected or complementary in their use. This stark figure not only enriches our understanding of layered substance abuse but also amplifies the urgency for multi-dimensional intervention strategies, ultimately underlining the profound significance of this statistic in the broader conversation on amphetamine abuse.

In Australia, between 2010–11 and 2015–16, the number of amphetamine-related hospitalizations increased 150%.

Painting an alarming picture of Australia’s amphetamine crisis, the striking increase of 150% in amphetamine-related hospitalizations between 2010-11 and 2015-16 lends gravity to the issue. This startling figure underscores the escalating public health concern and the social hazards posed by amphetamine abuse. It frames the severe strain on healthcare systems, mapping the dire landscape while demanding immediate intervention and preventative measures. This statistic, in essence, serves as a potent red flag, signaling the overwhelming growth and the pressing need to curb the amphetamine abuse epidemic in the country.

Conclusion

Based on the reviewed Amphetamine Abuse Statistics, it is evident that amphetamine misuse poses a legitimate public health concern. The data demonstrates a critical need for increased public awareness, education, and prevention campaigns. Furthermore, an expansion in treatment facilities and strategies would be beneficial in curbing the escalating trend observed in abuse statistics. Future research should also aim at understanding the underlying causes promoting such abuse, thereby facilitating the development of targeted intervention strategies.

References

0. – https://www.www.columbian.com

1. – https://www.www.ussc.gov

2. – https://www.www.aihw.gov.au

3. – https://www.www.sandiegouniontribune.com

4. – https://www.www.apnews.com

5. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

6. – https://www.www.npr.org

7. – https://www.www.drugabuse.gov

8. – https://www.www.samhsa.gov

9. – https://www.www.sfgate.com

10. – https://www.riv.se

11. – https://www.www.emcdda.europa.eu

12. – https://www.monitoringthefuture.org

13. – https://www.www.sandag.org

FAQs

What is amphetamine abuse?

Amphetamine abuse refers to the misuse of drugs containing amphetamines, either by taking them in higher doses, more frequently, or in a different manner than prescribed by a healthcare professional. It's also abuse to take these drugs recreationally, especially when they haven't been prescribed for you.

What are the common signs and symptoms of amphetamine abuse?

The signs of amphetamine abuse can include increased heart rate and blood pressure, excessive talkativeness, decreased appetite, unexplained weight loss, excessive sweating, agitation, and irregular sleep patterns. In severe cases, it can cause paranoia, hallucinations, and aggressive behavior.

What are the long-term effects of amphetamine abuse?

Long-term effects can be severe and include malnutrition due to decreased appetite, mental health issues such as anxiety and depression, heart problems due to increased heart rate and blood pressure, and, in severe cases, addiction with withdrawal symptoms when attempting to quit.

What kind of treatment options are available for individuals dealing with amphetamine abuse?

Treatment typically involves several steps including detoxification, therapy (both individual and group therapy), medication (if necessary), and long-term follow-up care to prevent relapse. The specific treatment plan may vary depending on the individual's needs and the severity of their addiction.

Can amphetamine abuse lead to an addiction?

Yes, consistent misuse of amphetamines can lead to a substance use disorder, commonly called an addiction. As tolerance builds, users may need increasingly larger doses to achieve the same effect, which in turn can lead to physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms when trying to quit.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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