GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

United States Landfills Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important United States Landfills Statistics

  • As of 2018, the total number of landfills in US is approximately 2000.
  • Over 139 million tons of MSW (municipal solid waste) were landfilled in the United States in 2017.
  • Peninsula Sanitary Landfill in Union is the largest landfill in the United States with an area of over 2,200 acres.
  • New York is the top producer of waste to landfill in the United States with 14 million tons generated in 2018.
  • Landfills are the third-largest source of human-related methane emissions in the United States.
  • The United States generates over 254 million tons of trash yearly and about 53 percent, or 136 million tons, ends up in landfills.
  • The average American person will produce 102 tons of garbage that contribute to landfills over their lifetime.
  • According to a 2018 study, 40% of the waste that ends up in US landfills is food waste.
  • Nearly 22% of landfill waste in the United States is made up of plastics.
  • Approximately 1.3 pounds of our individual waste production per day in America goes to a landfill.

Table of Contents

The article you’re set to immerse yourself in provides an in-depth analysis of the United States Landfills Statistics. As seemingly invisible entities within our environment, landfills play an astounding role in waste management, and exploring their impact exposes pertinent information concerning sustainability, recycling, and our environmental footprint. From the volume of waste landfilled annually, the number and size of active landfills, to the lifespan of these sites, and the portion of the solid waste that is recycled, this comprehensive look into the statistics surrounding American landfills will give you a profound understanding and perspective on our nation’s waste disposal system.

The Latest United States Landfills Statistics Unveiled

As of 2018, the total number of landfills in US is approximately 2000.

Diving into a fresh perspective on the number of landfills in the United States, roughly 2000 as recorded in 2018, allows us to navigate the vast landscape of waste management in the country. Unpacking this statistic provides a staggering revelation on the sheer scale of facilities handling our trash, potentially sparking valuable conversations about sustainable practices and waste reduction. Consequently, it not only highlights the country’s dependency on such locations but also serves as a benchmark, reminding us of the environmental implications, pushing us to rethink and reformulate our actions towards waste creation. Thus, this number becomes a critical pillar of our discussion on United States Landfills Statistics.

Over 139 million tons of MSW (municipal solid waste) were landfilled in the United States in 2017.

Highlighting the daunting figure of over 139 million tons of Municipal Solid Waste landfilled in the United States in 2017 punctuates the alarming scale of waste management struggles the nation confronts. These stark numbers ignite conversations around the implications for environmental health, sustainability, and public policy. They underscore the magnitude of the challenge, serving as a call to action for heightened recycling efforts, waste reduction initiatives and efficient landfill management techniques. Therefore, these figures provide a relevant and critical backdrop to any comprehensive discussion on US landfill statistics.

Peninsula Sanitary Landfill in Union is the largest landfill in the United States with an area of over 2,200 acres.

Highlighting the magnitude of the Peninsula Sanitary Landfill in Union, known as the largest landfill in the United States covering a mammoth area of over 2,200 acres, accentuates an urgent societal issue. In the United States Landfills Statistical narrative, this data point offers an illustrative testament to the considerable quantities of waste being generated and underscores the prevalent reliance on landfills for waste management. This simple factual detail thus raises pertinent questions about environmental impact, resource usage, and sustainability that must be recognized in our ongoing dialogue on waste management strategies and policies.

New York is the top producer of waste to landfill in the United States with 14 million tons generated in 2018.

Highlighting New York as the highest contributor to landfill waste in the United States, with a staggering 14 million tons in 2018, serves as a striking illustration of the sheer volume of waste generated across the country. In a blog post dedicated to revealing the realities of landfill statistics in the U.S, it underscores the gravity of the waste management issue facing America’s most populated city. Beyond just numbers, it brings home the pressing need for effective waste reduction strategies and lends weight to discussions about sustainable practices. This unseemly crown New York wears becomes a compelling starting point for wider conversations on landfill footprints of major U.S. cities, creating a domino effect of awareness and action.

Landfills are the third-largest source of human-related methane emissions in the United States.

Delving into the environmental repercussions of landfills, it’s startling to discover that they rank as the third-largest contributors to human-related methane emissions in the United States. This statistic bears enormous weight, particularly for enthusiasts and policy makers driving environmental conservation. It underscores the critical need for a broader push towards eco-friendly waste management strategies. Not only does it reiterate the direct impact of human activity on climate change, but it also serves as a clarion call to action, urging the country to reevaluate its waste management policies for the sake of our planet’s future.

The United States generates over 254 million tons of trash yearly and about 53 percent, or 136 million tons, ends up in landfills.

With staggering figures such as over 254 million tons of waste produced each year by the United States—a hefty 53% of which, approximately 136 million tons, finds its final destination in landfills—it’s concerning to realize the magnitude of our trash problem. This quantitative reality paints a vivid illustration of the mounting pressures exerted on our landfill systems, illuminating the necessity for improved waste management strategies, and highlighting how vital it is for us to mitigate this issue. Illumining the egregious predicament, these figures serve as an impetus for stimulating thoughtful conversation on resources consumption, recycling and responsible, sustainable waste disposal in our blog post about U.S Landfill Statistics.

The average American person will produce 102 tons of garbage that contribute to landfills over their lifetime.

In a blog post focusing on United States Landfill Statistics, the fact that an average American generates 102 tons of garbage over their lifetime highlights a sobering fact. This statistic urges readers to consider the enormity of individuals’ contributions to waste generation, painting a stark picture of how collective habits contribute to landfill proliferation. It becomes an alarming call to action, prompting discussions around necessary changes in consumption, waste management practices, and policy to curb escalating environmental challenges posed by landfills. The statistic also paves the way for exploring potential approaches to reduce waste, from recycling to upcycling, thus fostering consciousness about the pressing need for effective waste solutions.

According to a 2018 study, 40% of the waste that ends up in US landfills is food waste.

The striking revelation that 40% of waste in US landfills in 2018 came from food waste profoundly punctuates the narrative of United States landfill statistics. It not only magnifies the pervading issue of food waste management, but it also emphasizes the environmental strain exerted by landfills. This percentile serves as a critical environmental statistic that paints an alarming picture of vast food resources being squandered. Such data, therefore, demands utmost attention, as it heightens an understanding of the complex relationship between domestic waste generation, resource wastage, and urgent environmental concerns.

Nearly 22% of landfill waste in the United States is made up of plastics.

Highlighting that nearly 22% of landfill waste in the US consists of plastics provides a stark illustration of the pressing environmental issue we face. It underlines the severity of plastic pollution, as this non-biodegradable material poses grave long-term risks to ecosystems, wildlife, and human health. This statistic serves as a call to action, urging for effective waste management strategies, increased recycling efforts, and a reduction in plastic use nationwide. In the broader context of United States Landfills Statistics, it emphasizes the significant contribution of plastics to the burgeoning landfill crisis, making it critically relevant to our discussion.

Approximately 1.3 pounds of our individual waste production per day in America goes to a landfill.

Highlighting the average waste production statistic of approximately 1.3 pounds per individual per day underscores the implications of America’s consumption habits on our landfills. Within the layers of the U.S. landfill statistics, this number exposes the stark reality of our linear economy – take, make, waste – as it directly contributes to the growing landfill pile. Acting as a silent alarm bell, this stat challenges us to reflect on our individual actions and their environmental impacts while illustrating the urgent need for waste management reforms and efficient recycling initiatives.

Conclusion

A closer examination of United States landfill statistics reveals a pressing need for improved waste management strategies. Despite some reduction in individual waste generation, the overall increase in population still leads to a significant contribution to the total waste volume. While successful recycling programs provide a measure of relief, landfill remain the primary waste disposal method. To ensure a sustainable future, both individual actions and corporate responsibility will need to augment official waste management policies in reducing waste and promoting recycling.

References

0. – https://www.www.rts.com

1. – https://www.www.ibisworld.com

2. – https://www.www.usi.edu

3. – https://www.www.epa.gov

4. – https://www.www.statista.com

5. – https://www.www.imanageperformance.com

6. – https://www.www.saveonenergy.com

FAQs

How many landfills are there in the United States?

According to the latest data from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), there are about 1,738 active landfills in the United States as of 2021.

What is the average size of a typical U.S. landfill?

The size of landfills can vary greatly, but the average size of a municipal landfill in the U.S. is about 600 acres.

How much waste does the average American contribute to landfills each year?

According to the EPA, each American throws away an average of 4.51 pounds of waste per day, totaling around 1,646 pounds of waste per person, per year.

What's the largest landfill in the U.S.?

The largest landfill in the U.S. is the Apex Regional Landfill near Las Vegas, Nevada. It covers approximately 2,200 acres and can accept up to 9,000 tons of waste per day.

At the current rate, how long before U.S. landfills reach capacity?

It's difficult to predict exactly when the U.S. landfills will reach capacity as this greatly depends on waste production trends and recycling efforts. However, a report by the Waste Business Journal estimates that the nation's landfills will be full in about 62 years based on current disposal volumes and practices.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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