GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Unemployed Veteran Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Unemployed Veteran Statistics

  • As of 2020, the overall unemployment rate for veterans fell to 5.3% from 3.1% in 2019.
  • Approximately 500,000 veterans are unemployed in the United States.
  • In 2017, the unemployment rate for Veterans was 3.7%.
  • The unemployment rate for Gulf War-era II veterans fell to 5.7% in 2020.
  • Veterans with a disability had an unemployment rate of 5.7% in 2017.
  • The unemployment rate in 2020 for male veterans was 5.9%, and for female veterans, it was 5.8%.
  • Veterans between ages 25-34 have a 7.5% unemployment rate, according to 2020 statistics.
  • In 2018, 37.9% of veterans experienced a period of unemployment lasting 27 weeks or longer.
  • Approximately 30% of unhoused veterans have experienced unemployment.
  • Over 50% of unemployed veterans served in Gulf War-era II.
  • About 18% of unemployed veterans have been jobless for 99 weeks or more.
  • The black Veterans had an unemployment rate of 6.2 percent in August 2018.
  • In 2019, 37% of unemployed veterans were aged 25 to 44.
  • Female veterans are more likely to be unemployed than male veterans (5.5% vs. 5.1% in 2020).
  • In 2017, the unemployment rate was highest for Hispanic veterans at 4.7%.
  • More than 40% of all unemployed veterans are aged 45 and over.
  • In 2018, approximately 6.3% of unemployed veterans had not completed high school.
  • Veterans with a service-connected disability had an unemployment rate of 6.5% in 2018.
  • In 2019, 4% of veterans in the labor force were unemployed.

Table of Contents

Understanding the plight of our national heroes is crucial in taking necessary steps to improve their quality of life after service. One major issue that veterans face upon returning to the civilian world is unemployment. Our deep-dive into unemployed veteran statistics aims to shed light on the magnitude of this issue, including the rates, trends, and associated factors. By investigating these key insights, we can spur discussions on effective solutions to address joblessness among this respected yet often overlooked demographic.

The Latest Unemployed Veteran Statistics Unveiled

As of 2020, the overall unemployment rate for veterans fell to 5.3% from 3.1% in 2019.

Illuminating a significant shift in the landscape of veteran employment, the 2.2% increase in veteran unemployment between 2019 and 2020, as suggested by the rise from 3.1% to 5.3%, plays a pivotal role in our narrative. This figure not only underscores the growing challenges and disparities facing our veterans in the job market, but it also calls attention to possible exacerbating effects of global events such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Consequently, this uptick kicks-starts important dialogues surrounding bolstering the support and resources available to our veterans, making it an indispensable component in our blog post on Unemployed Veteran Statistics.

Approximately 500,000 veterans are unemployed in the United States.

Highlighting the striking figure of approximately 500,000 unemployed veterans in the United States underscores the urgent need to address veteran employment issues. This figure not only represents the economic challenges faced by a significant portion of our heroes after service, but also elucidates potential societal issues such as homelessness, mental health and welfare dependency. In the context of a blog post about Unemployed Veteran Statistics, this statistic serves as a compelling pivot, providing readers with a quantifiable measure of the scope of the problem, while also advocating for effective strategies and policy interventions to improve employment opportunities for veterans.

In 2017, the unemployment rate for Veterans was 3.7%.

Shedding light on the 2017 figure, where the veteran unemployment rate was pegged at 3.7%, offers a vital perspective in comprehending the trajectory of joblessness within this unique demographic. Amid the discourse on unemployed veteran statistics, this figure serves as a benchmark, underlining both the specific challenges veterans face in securing employment after service and the effectiveness of initiatives designed to integrate them back into the civilian workforce. Comparing this metric with those of analogous groups or from different years could unfold compelling narratives about economic conditions, policy changes, and shifts in societal attitudes towards veterans.

The unemployment rate for Gulf War-era II veterans fell to 5.7% in 2020.

Highlighting the decline in unemployment rate for Gulf War-era II veterans to 5.7% in 2020 offers a beacon of hope in the narrative about Unemployed Veteran Statistics. It serves as a powerful testament to the successful strategies and interventions implemented to counter veteran unemployment. It adds a significant perspective, painting a picture of improvement and resilience, thereby illustrating the potential for further progress on the issue. Additionally, it acts as a call to action. Understanding this diminishing unemployment lends weight to the need for continued commitment towards more solutions for veteran employment issues.

Veterans with a disability had an unemployment rate of 5.7% in 2017.

Interweaving the detail that in 2017 there was a 5.7% unemployment rate among disabled veterans adds a heavy layer of gravity to the narrative of unemployed veteran statistics. It highlights an integral aspect of the issue at hand, delineating the often overlooked segment of veterans, those with disabilities, who face significant hurdles in their job-seeking endeavors. Not only does this add a depth of understanding to the overarching theme of veteran unemployment, it also sheds light on the additional challenges encountered by these brave individuals post their military service, spurring empathy, awareness, and potentially, action among the readers.

The unemployment rate in 2020 for male veterans was 5.9%, and for female veterans, it was 5.8%.

The highlighted statistics in the context of unemployed veteran statistics provides a poignant glimpse into the current state of employment among those who’ve served their country. A close 5.9% and 5.8% unemployment rate for male and female veterans respectively, subtly highlights the gender neutrality of the issue and illustrates a certain equality in challenges faced post-military service. This adds an additional shade of understanding to the discussion, nudging us towards a more inclusive approach on solution brainstorming, where programs and policies are gender-inclusive, ultimately, fortifying our stance against veteran unemployment in 2020 and beyond.

Veterans between ages 25-34 have a 7.5% unemployment rate, according to 2020 statistics.

Drilling down into the murky depths of the Unemployed Veteran Statistics, one comes across a striking revelation from the 2020 data-block. Veterans in the age range of 25-34, far from the battlefield, are grappling with a different challenge: an unemployment rate of 7.5%. This figure serves as a critical thread in understanding the complex tapestry of veterans’ transition into civilian life. It underscores not just the economic lag that veterans navigate but also the necessity of targeted support systems to bolster their reintegration. Highlighting points such as this help illuminate the broader narrative- a detailed snapshot of veteran practicability in our rapidly evolving job market.

In 2018, 37.9% of veterans experienced a period of unemployment lasting 27 weeks or longer.

Grasping the weight of the 2018 statistic that cites 37.9% of veterans facing unemployment for 27 weeks or longer is crucial for delving deeper into the issue of unemployed veteran statistics. Not only does this figure spotlight the prolonged struggle against joblessness in the veteran community, but it also underscores the need for systematic improvements in the process of transitioning from military to civilian employment. This high percentage may further signal potential issues such as the undervaluation of military skills in the civilian job market, the mismatch of veterans’ skills to available jobs, or potential complications due to physical or mental health issues resulting from service – each of which warrants further investigation and action.

Approximately 30% of unhoused veterans have experienced unemployment.

Highlighting that ‘Approximately 30% of unhoused veterans have experienced unemployment’ serves as a stark reminder and crucial point in our discussion on unemployed veteran statistics. It underscores the intricate link between employment problems faced by veterans and homelessness, underlining the urgency needed in addressing the issue. This statistic inspires a deeper exploration into the contributing factors, potential solutions, and availability of resources geared towards alleviating the unemployment plight this valued group faces – a significant discussion in building support systems, policy planning, and strategic intervention.

Over 50% of unemployed veterans served in Gulf War-era II.

The astounding figure that over 50% of unemployed veterans originate from the Gulf War-era II era forms a riveting cornerstone in a blog post about Unemployed Veteran Statistics. Not only does it spotlight a specific, recent time frame, it underscores the ongoing struggles faced by this group after their dedicated service. This detail reveals the need for increased post-deployment support for these veterans, including intensified job training and mental health programs. Shedding light on this population’s plight also invites sociopolitical discourse about veterans’ welfare, thereby making this statistic a potent catalyst for awareness and potential socio-economic change.

About 18% of unemployed veterans have been jobless for 99 weeks or more.

The statistic ‘About 18% of unemployed veterans have been jobless for 99 weeks or more’ sheds light on the enduring plight experienced by a substantial segment of our nation’s heroes. It underscores a profound issue within the job market for veterans, indicating that despite their invaluable contributions and extensive training, nearly one in five are languishing in long-term unemployment. This data point reinforces the need for targeted interventions and programs to assist veterans in transitioning back to civilian work life, and hence is an essential component to consider in any comprehensive discourse on unemployed veteran statistics.

The black Veterans had an unemployment rate of 6.2 percent in August 2018.

Highlighting the 6.2 percent unemployment rate among Black Veterans in August 2018 brings into sharp relief a pivotal issue in the sphere of Veteran Unemployment Statistics. It accentuates an area of concern requiring concerted efforts by policymakers, sociologists, and economists alike. The figure not just represents a crucial demographic’s struggles with joblessness, but it also potentially points towards patterns of systemic inequities or barriers that disproportionately affect this specific community. This numerical evidence is invaluable in shaping serious discourse, targeted interventions, and setting up benchmarks for measuring progress in reducing unemployment among all Veterans, ensuring a balanced post-service life.

In 2019, 37% of unemployed veterans were aged 25 to 44.

Highlighting the statistic “In 2019, 37% of unemployed veterans were aged 25 to 44” serves as a critical focal point in a blog post about Unemployed Veteran Statistics, drawing attention to the age group most impacted by unemployment post-military service. These startling figures emphasize the deep-seated challenges young veterans face transitioning back into civilian life and underline the urgent need for targeted job placement programs, life skills courses as well as education benefits. It operates as a signpost, urging policy makers, veteran support organizations, and individuals to focus their efforts on this significant, and often overlooked, demographic.

Female veterans are more likely to be unemployed than male veterans (5.5% vs. 5.1% in 2020).

Highlighting the fact that female veterans face a higher rate of unemployment compared to their male counterparts (5.5% vs 5.1% in 2020) serves a critical purpose in our discussion on Unemployed Veteran Statistics. This nuance sparks a dialogue about the unique challenges female veterans may confront in the job market, possibly rooted in systemic gender bias or predisposed occupational hurdles. By illuminating these disparities, we are able to better understand the comprehensive landscape of unemployment among former service members and work towards equitable solutions to improve veterans’ job opportunities regardless of gender.

In 2017, the unemployment rate was highest for Hispanic veterans at 4.7%.

Immersing readers in Unemployed Veteran Statistics, the noteworthy 4.7% unemployment rate of Hispanic veterans in 2017 demands our attention, acting as a vivid indicator of the particular economic challenges faced by this group. This statistic, an undeniable benchmark, whispers of the diversity and complexity inherent within veteran communities, revealing notable disparities. It invites us to turn our analytical gaze towards understanding not only the ‘what’ but also the ‘why’, offering a gateway into deeper discussions about historical trends, systemic issues impacting minority veterans and the critical need for tailored solutions that accommodate the unique needs of different racial and ethnic groups within our veteran population.

More than 40% of all unemployed veterans are aged 45 and over.

In penning an enlightening blog post about Unemployed Veteran Statistics, it’s paramount to underline a striking figure: ‘over 40% of all unemployed veterans are aged 45 and older.’ This glaring statistic immediately prompts us to reflect on a population often overlooked in our society — aging veterans. Beyond the age factor, it forces us to acknowledge the unique challenges they face re-adjusting to civilian life and the job market, which may not be as accommodating or understanding of their situation. This figure is not just a statistic; it’s a wakeup call for policymakers, advocates, and organizations to reassess their strategies in supporting our veterans, particularly those in their later years.

In 2018, approximately 6.3% of unemployed veterans had not completed high school.

Highlighting the statistic that ‘In 2018, approximately 6.3% of unemployed veterans had not completed high school’ offers a critical insight into the intersection between education and veteran unemployment. When addressing the plight of unemployed veterans, this figure emphasizes the role that educational attainment, or lack thereof, can play in military personnel’s transition back into civilian life. It underscores a poignant narrative of how the educational gaps in this vulnerable group can potentially affect their job prospects and drag them into the unemployment vortex. This revelation kindles a compelling discourse on ensuring better educational opportunities and resources for our veterans, fostering a smoother reintegration into the workforce and society at large.

Veterans with a service-connected disability had an unemployment rate of 6.5% in 2018.

Shining a spotlight on the 6.5% unemployment rate of veterans with a service-connected disability in 2018 presents a compelling narrative within a blog post delving into unemployed veteran statistics. Not only does this delineate the unique challenges that disabled veterans face in finding gainful employment, but it also underscores ongoing societal barriers and the need for more focused supportive measures. It paints a stark picture of the state of veterans’ reintegration into civilian life, and can serve as a compelling call to action to foster policies focused on aiding these brave individuals who have sacrificed their health in service of the nation.

In 2019, 4% of veterans in the labor force were unemployed.

In the attempt to navigate the complex landscape of Veteran employment, our attention is lured to a striking statistic highlighted in 2019 which asserts that 4% of veterans in the labor force were unemployed. Serving as a revealing snippet into the profound challenges veterans face when transitioning from military to civilian employment, this statistic enhances our understanding of the scope of the issue. Consequently, it forms a significant factor in discussions which aim to generate solutions to integrate our heroes effectively back into the workforce. The figure thus informs the dialogue about the need for enhanced resources, targeted programs, and robust systems that foster vocational support and facilitate successful labor market transitions for our veterans.

Conclusion

The data regarding unemployed veteran statistics is invaluable for more than just measuring employment rates. It provides key insights into the vocational challenges veterans face when transitioning back into civilian life. It serves as a critical benchmark for policymakers, veteran-affairs departments, and private sector organizations, pointing where veteran-oriented employment initiatives and support resources need to be implemented or improved. Ultimately, it is our collective responsibility to ensure that those who have served our country are well equipped for success in the civilian job market.

References

0. – https://www.www.census.gov

1. – https://www.www.va.gov

2. – https://www.www.apa.org

3. – https://www.dod.defense.gov

4. – https://www.nvf.org

5. – https://www.datausa.io

6. – https://www.www.bls.gov

FAQs

How many veterans are unemployed in the United States?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of 2020, the unemployment rate for veterans was 5.3%, which amounts to approximately 495,000 unemployed veterans.

What factors contribute to the high unemployment rate among veterans?

Several factors contribute to veteran unemployment often, it is challenging to translate military skills to the civilian job market. Also, veterans sometimes struggle with physical or mental health issues (such as PTSD) related to their service.

What is the age group that has the highest unemployment rate among veterans?

Generally, younger veterans (ages 18-24) face a higher rate of unemployment than their older counterparts. This is often attributed to their lack of work experience outside the military and difficulty transitioning back into civilian life.

Are there programs available to assist unemployed veterans?

Yes, there are several programs like the Veterans' Employment and Training Service (VETS) and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) program. These programs provide resources and services to assist veterans in transitioning to civilian employment.

How do veteran unemployment rates compare to non-veteran unemployment rates?

Historically, the unemployment rate for veterans is usually closer to or slightly lower than the rate for non-veterans. However, specific groups of veterans, such as younger veterans, can experience higher unemployment rates compared to the general population.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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