GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Syrian Refugee Gender Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Syrian Refugee Gender Statistics

  • "49.3% of Syrian refugees in Lebanon are men and boys, while 50.7% are women and girls",
  • "Approximately 60% of registered refugees from Syria are women and children."
  • "Of Syrian refugees in Jordan, 51.1% are female."
  • "Only 22% of Syrian Refugees resettled in the United States were male adults."
  • "About 52.1% of Syrian refugees in Iraq are female."
  • "The number of Syrian refugee women in Germany exceeds the number of men by 5%."
  • "Around 47.9% of Syrian refugees in Egypt are men."
  • "In Canada, roughly 48% of Syrian refugees were female, as of 2017."
  • "If looking at individual and total numbers of all refugees, women make up for approximately 44% among all Syrian refugees."
  • "As of 2020, roughly 21.1% of the total Syrian refugee population in Kurdistan Region of Iraq are women of working age."
  • "Around 48% of Syrian refugee households in Lebanon are headed by women."
  • "Around 44% of the Syrian refugee population in Jordan are adult women."
  • "In the Netherlands, 46.6% of the total number of Syrian refugees are female."
  • "In Australia, 41% of the total Syrian refugees resettled to Australia are female."
  • "48% of the total number of Syrian refugees in Austria are female."

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Delving into the multiple facets of demographic analysis, our blog post for today concerns an often underrepresented aspect of displacement crises, focusing on the Syrian Refugee Gender Statistics. We shed light on the intricate gender dynamics that come into play when mass displacement occurs, reinforcing our understanding of how war and conflict disproportionately impact different sexes. Drawing from reliable sources, this post will offer a comprehensive exploration of the gender-based statistics of Syrian refugees, offering valuable insights that can guide humane, effective responses to these persistent global crises.

The Latest Syrian Refugee Gender Statistics Unveiled

“49.3% of Syrian refugees in Lebanon are men and boys, while 50.7% are women and girls”,

Delving into the nuances of gender distribution among Syrian refugees in Lebanon, the fine balance namely, 49.3% being males and boys and the slight upper hand of females and girls amounting to 50.7%, provides an indispensable insight. These figures do more than just tell us about numerical data; they offer a deeper understanding of the gender-related challenges faced during the resettlement process, while also helping to address potential gender-biased social programs in Lebanon. Greater representation of women and girls could signify more instances of familial stress due to displacement or higher survival rates among females. Without a doubt, it plays a pivotal role in shaping aid and empowerment initiatives, ensuring gender equity in resources and opportunities, thus presenting a holistic picture of Syrian refugees’ reality in Lebanon.

“Approximately 60% of registered refugees from Syria are women and children.”

The demographic revelation that approximately 60% of registered Syrian refugees are women and children significantly underlines the unseen hardship faced by this vulnerable group. This statistic brings into focus the dire circumstances faced by these populations, soliciting greater attention to their specific needs and challenges. In a blog post about Syrian Refugee Gender Statistics, this highlights a disproportionate impact of the conflict on women and children, shedding light on the gender inequality, potential exploitation, and intensified risks faced by this group. This spotlight paves the way for targeted efforts and policies in refugee aid, emphasizing the necessity for special protective measures tailored to the needs of women and children.

“Of Syrian refugees in Jordan, 51.1% are female.”

An insightful stepping stone in understanding the gender composition among Syrian refugees in Jordan is brought into perspective through the revelation that 51.1% of them are female. This statistic not only underscores an almost even division between genders, but it also highlights an array of complexities related to gender issues. These could include female vulnerability and the pressing need for gender-specific support services. By analysing these figures, policy makers, researchers, and humanitarian organizations can better tailor their efforts, interventions and resource allocation to cater to the unique needs and vulnerabilities of both male and female refugees, thereby creating a more equitable environment for all.

“Only 22% of Syrian Refugees resettled in the United States were male adults.”

The statistic indicating that merely 22% of Syrian refugees resettled in the United States were male adults delivers intriguing insights within the realm of Syrian Refugee Gender Statistics. Rowing against the popular perception that men might predominate the refugee demographics, this datum unveils a stark contrast revealing a majority share of women and children among the refugee populace. This consequently underscores the potential for differential resource allocation, integration hurdles, and social adaptabilities, helping to guide policymakers, NGOs, and society in devising tailored approaches to facilitate their assimilation. It shifts the discourse from generic policies to those cognizant of the gender dynamics thereby, enriching the mosaic of refugee understanding and integration.

“About 52.1% of Syrian refugees in Iraq are female.”

The statistic —’About 52.1% of Syrian refugees in Iraq are female’— unfolds a crucial narrative into the gender dynamics of the Syrian refugee crisis. This percentage, by rising above the 50% mark, implies a significant propensity of women seeming more at risk, thereby accentuating their vulnerabilities in conflict zones. Therefore, the figure underscores the necessity for governmental and humanitarian entities to prioritize gender-sensitive policies and interventions – from healthcare to socio-economic support – to address the specific needs and challenges encountered by female refugees. In doing so, it remarkably contributes to the larger narrative of gender disparities in migration, conflict, and displacement.

“The number of Syrian refugee women in Germany exceeds the number of men by 5%.”

In delving into the complexities of Syrian Refugee Gender Statistics, one can’t overlook the intrigue surrounding the statistic that Syrian refugee women in Germany outnumber men by 5%. This distinctive demographic skew transcends mere numbers. It invokes consideration of gender-focused perspectives, challenging conventional diaspora narratives which often sideline the unique experiences of women. Given this numerical advantage, it amplifies the voices, struggles and triumphs of these women within refugee dialogues. Moreover, it compels policymakers and stakeholders to adopt gender-responsive mechanisms, ensure equal opportunities, and address female-specific challenges to foster an inclusive and resilient environment for refugees in Germany. Therefore, the importance of this statistic is not merely quantitative but deeply qualitative, affecting socio-economic policies, diversity efforts, and gender equality discussions.

“Around 47.9% of Syrian refugees in Egypt are men.”

Delving into the gender demographic of Syrian refugees in Egypt illuminates the fact that nearly half, precisely 47.9%, are men. This offers significant insight in a blog post on Syrian Refugee Gender Statistics as it opens up pertinent discussions. For instance, it underlines the number of males possibly exposed to various risks such as forced labor or recruitment into armed groups. Moreover, it portrays the potential strain on resources to cater to the specific needs of male refugees such as job opportunities or education. It also aids in designing gender-specific interventions and policies, thus providing a more comprehensive understanding of the crisis.

“In Canada, roughly 48% of Syrian refugees were female, as of 2017.”

Shedding light on gender distribution among Syrian refugees in Canada, this statistic wholeheartedly presents an intriguing account of demographic balance with women constituting nearly 48% of the irrelevant group as of 2017. Comparatively equal representation of genders hints at the inclusivity of Canada’s refugee acceptance policy. It also provides an instrumental analysis point for the interplay of gender in various issues concerning refugees – from resettlement experiences and integration challenges to resources accessibility and employment opportunities. Hence, it serves as an invaluable foundation for a more comprehensive understanding and a diverse discussion in a blog post centered around Syrian Refugee Gender Statistics.

“If looking at individual and total numbers of all refugees, women make up for approximately 44% among all Syrian refugees.”

Highlighting that approximately 44% of all Syrian refugees are women greatly enriches our understanding of gender dynamics within the refugee population in the context of a blog post about Syrian Refugee Gender Statistics. It challenges preconceived notions, emphasizing that vulnerability in displacement isn’t gender-exclusive, while also underscoring the necessity to address the distinctive experiences, needs, and strengths of female refugees. Far from being a mere number, the statistic reveals an integral facet of the refugee crisis and becomes a call to action, prompting organizations and policymakers to develop gender-sensitive strategies and interventions.

“As of 2020, roughly 21.1% of the total Syrian refugee population in Kurdistan Region of Iraq are women of working age.”

Highlighting that, as of 2020, roughly 21.1% of the total Syrian refugee population in Kurdistan Region of Iraq are women of working age, serves as a critical indicator of the potential untapped socioeconomic contributions within the refugee community. In the narrative of Syrian Refugee Gender Statistics, it emphasizes the quantity of human capital in terms of working-age females, and the potential empowerment, should adequate opportunities and resources be provided. Moreover, it further underscores the necessity of inclusive employment policies to engage these women effectively, which could ultimately bolster economic growth and foster sustainable livelihoods. Their economic integration could also serve as a powerful catalyst for societal transformation, challenging traditional gender norms and contributing to gender equality.

“Around 48% of Syrian refugee households in Lebanon are headed by women.”

Illustrating the strength and resilience of women in challenging situations, the fact that approximately 48% of Syrian refugee households in Lebanon are led by women offers valuable insights into the gender dynamics within Syrian refugee communities. This statistic not only shines a light on the transformative social roles borne out of necessity in the face of crisis but also emphasizes the considerable burden carried by women striving to provide for their families while navigating the hardships of refugee-living. It’s an eye-opening reality check, setting the stage for a nuanced exploration of gender-related issues, vulnerabilities and opportunities within the refugee context in our subsequent discussion.

“Around 44% of the Syrian refugee population in Jordan are adult women.”

Highlighting that roughly 44% of the Syrian refugee population in Jordan comprises of adult women reveals a significant demographic shift which can potentially reshape both the refugee community and the host society’s social and economic landscape. This raises pertinent queries about specific services and support required for these women, such as reproductive health care, employment opportunities and safety measures. In addition, it also underscores the resilience and courage of these women who not only take on the role of caregiving within their families, but also contribute significantly to their community. Hence, such information lends an important perspective in understanding the refugee crisis through a gender-focused lens.

“In the Netherlands, 46.6% of the total number of Syrian refugees are female.”

Shining a light on the resilience and strength of the Syrian diaspora, the statistic reveals that in the Netherlands, females make up 46.6% of the total Syrian refugee population. In the context of a blog post about Syrian Refugee Gender Statistics, this particular piece of data is paramount, as it seizes a more nuanced understanding of the gender structure within this refugee population. It underscores the significance of formulating policies and support systems that are cognisant of the unique challenges and experiences that female Syrian refugees might encounter, taking them a step closer towards a life of safety, dignity and opportunity.

“In Australia, 41% of the total Syrian refugees resettled to Australia are female.”

Spotlighting the figure that 41% of Syrian refugees resettled in Australia are female reveals a compelling aspect of the Syrian Refugee Gender Statistics narrative. This percentage serves as an essential gauge of the gender distribution among refugees, potentially indicating the representation, equity, or perhaps challenges and crises specific to female refugees. By underscoring this focus, the statistic reflects underlying social issues related to gender and migration, paving the way for intensified discussions, informed policies, and effective responses to gender-related refugee concerns in Australia and beyond.

“48% of the total number of Syrian refugees in Austria are female.”

Highlighting that “48% of Syrian refugees in Austria are female” imbues our blog post with critical insights about the gender composition within the refugee crisis. It underscores the intricate balance between males and females in the asylum-seeking journey, providing a deeper understanding of the potential gender-related challenges and needs. This figure propels conversations beyond mere numbers, opening pathways into matters of gender equality, safety, health access, and the specific support required for female refugees. Furthermore, it emphasizes the importance of gender-sensitive asylum policies and aids in tailoring suitable interventions that uphold the rights and address the needs of these women, reinforcing our commitment to responsible data reporting and action-oriented discourse on refugee gender statistics.

Conclusion

In summary, the gender statistics of the Syrian refugee crisis reveal essential insights into the demographic makeup of affected individuals. With males and females almost equally impacted, it underscores the dire need for tailored humanitarian assistance for all. These distinct gender-based needs range from educational to healthcare facilities, child care to income generation opportunities, and addressing trauma. As the crisis continues, these gender statistics will remain pivotal to understanding and enhancing the aid’s effectiveness, implying that gender-focused initiatives are crucial for achieving equitable refugee support in the not-so-distant future.

References

0. – https://www.data2.unhcr.org

1. – https://www.www.pewresearch.org

2. – https://www.www.dtm.iom.int

3. – https://www.www150.statcan.gc.ca

4. – https://www.www.welt.de

5. – https://www.www.mercycorps.org

6. – https://www.www.alnap.org

7. – https://www.www.cbs.nl

8. – https://www.www.homeaffairs.gov.au

9. – https://www.www.fra.europa.eu

10. – https://www.www.rescue.org

11. – https://www.www.un.org

12. – https://www.reliefweb.int

FAQs

What is the gender distribution among the Syrian refugees?

According to the UNHCR, the gender distribution among Syrian refugees tends to be nearly equal, with slightly more males at 50.5% and females at 49.5%, but the proportions can vary by region and over time.

Does the gender ratio of Syrian refugees differ between adults and children?

Yes, the gender ratio can differ between adults and children. For example, among adult Syrian refugees, there might be more females than males, but among children, there might be more males. The dynamics greatly depend on specific circumstances and factors such as displacement and migration patterns.

Does the gender of Syrian refugees impact their ability to access resources and services in their host countries?

Yes, gender can influence the access to resources and services. For instance, due to cultural norms, women and girls may face more restrictions or barriers in terms of movement, employment, and education which impacts their ability to access aid and services.

How does gender influence the vulnerability of Syrian refugees to violence and abuse?

Gender plays a significant role in determining vulnerability to violence and abuses. Women and girls can be subject to gender-based violence such as sexual exploitation and child marriage, especially in times of crisis. Men and boys, on the other hand, may face heightened risk of forced recruitment, child labor, and harassment.

Are there differences in how male and female Syrian refugees are received by host countries?

Yes, host countries might respond differently to male and female refugees. This can be due to biases, cultural norms, or concerns over security. For example, some countries may be more hesitant to accept male refugees due to perceived security risks, while others might discriminate against female refugees due to gender biases or cultural beliefs.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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