GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Steroid Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Steroid Statistics

  • Steroid misuse among teenagers and young adults in the United States is estimated to be less than 1%, according to a 2007 survey.
  • In the year 2013, about 2.9 to 4 million Americans used anabolic steroids.
  • The global steroid market size was valued at USD 10.00 billion in 2018.
  • According to the US government, anabolic steroid use was highest among males (1.8%) and lowest among females (0.5%).
  • In 2002, about 22,000 individuals were hospitalized due to complications associated with anabolic steroids in the US.
  • A 2018 study found up to 46% of people using anabolic steroids experience withdrawal symptoms when they stop using them.
  • As per the NIDA survey in 2015, less than 1% of high school seniors reported using anabolic steroids each year.
  • In 2020, 40% of bodybuilders in Lucknow, India were found using anabolic steroids.
  • The use of anabolic steroids in elite sports is estimated to be between 1-6%, but it can be much higher in some sports.
  • Research suggests that 30 million people in the United States have used anabolic steroids sometime in their life.
  • Data from England shows a rise in admissions for anabolic steroid misuse from 29 in 2005 to 656 in 2015.
  • In Greece, the misuse of anabolic steroids typically starts from the age of 16 years.
  • In 2019, the UK's Office for National Statistics recorded 79 deaths involving image- and performance-enhancing drugs, 60 of which involved steroids.
  • The Controlled Substance Act of 1990 classified anabolic steroids as Schedule III drugs in the United States, carrying a maximum penalty of one year in prison and a $1,000 fine for a first drug offense.
  • According to NIDA's survey in 2019, about 7 in 1000 high school students in the US (below 1%) reported past-year use of anabolic steroid.
  • A 2016 study found that almost half (47.4%) of people misusing steroids reported experiencing side effects.
  • A 2001 survey found that one-third of steroid users in the United Kingdom had not consulted a physician.
  • An adolescent self-report study revealed that lifetime prevalence rate for anabolic steroids in males aged 14 to 19 reached 11%.
  • According to the CDC's 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System survey, approximately 4% of 12th-grade boys and 2.3% of 12th-grade girls reported lifetime use of steroids without a doctor's prescription.

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Dive into the intriguing world of Steroid Statistics, a niche yet extremely relevant field in public health discourse. This blog post is designed to unravel the numbers behind the usage of anabolic steroids, a crucial subset of performance-enhancing drugs. From exploring global trends to understanding usage rates among different demographics, professionals, athletes, and lifestyle users, we will delve deeply into the impact steroids are having on our society. Our exploration does not shy away from illuminating often hidden sides of the topic, including its ties to health consequences and its influence on professional sports. Join us as we decode the numbers, trends, and repercussions encapsulated in the world of Steroid Statistics.

The Latest Steroid Statistics Unveiled

Steroid misuse among teenagers and young adults in the United States is estimated to be less than 1%, according to a 2007 survey.

Highlighting the fact that the estimated misuse of steroids among teenagers and young adults in the U.S. is less than 1% according to a 2007 survey, serves as a pivotal point in the broader conversation around Steroid Statistics. This figure provides a snapshot of the extent of steroid use within this demographic, painting a picture of its pervasiveness or lack thereof. It enables us to interpret patterns, understand risks, and in turn, formulate effective strategies and policies related to steroid misuse. By laying the ground for targeted interventions, this statistic plays a crucial role in shaping the narrative in the blog post, underscoring the importance of fostering a society free from the detrimental health impacts of steroid abuse.

In the year 2013, about 2.9 to 4 million Americans used anabolic steroids.

Highlighting the figure that between 2.9 to 4 million Americans turned to anabolic steroids in 2013 offers a stark revelation of the significant reach of steroid use in America’s recent past. The sheer magnitude of these numbers underscores the critical nature of understanding the use and impacts of steroids – making this fact an essential element in a comprehensive discussion on steroid statistics. This robust number not only draws attention to the prevalence of steroid usage but also serves as a call-to-action for public health initiatives, education campaigns, and policy framers to aptly address and manage this issue.

The global steroid market size was valued at USD 10.00 billion in 2018.

Highlighting the valuation of the global steroid market at USD 10.00 billion in 2018 provides a concrete portrait of the magnitude and significance of steroid usage worldwide within the context of a blog post about steroid statistics. This substantial economic measurement not only demonstrates the extensive demand and consumption of these substances across various sectors such as healthcare, sports and fitness, but also underscores the potential implications on public health, the economy, and policy regulations. Moreover, it sets the stage for addressing the complexities and nuances associated with the steroid market, paving the way for more in-depth discussions on trends, challenges, and future projections. In essence, it’s the entry point that draws readers to the larger narrative revolving around the global steroid phenomena.

According to the US government, anabolic steroid use was highest among males (1.8%) and lowest among females (0.5%).

Highlighted in the larger discourse on Steroid Statistics through the prism of gender utilization patterns, the above fact significantly unravels the categorical prevalence of anabolic steroid use between the sexes. Notably, the U.S government underlines the considerably higher use among males (1.8%) vis-à-vis its more restrained manifestation in females (0.5%). This marked inclination towards males can be attributed to sociocultural emphasis on muscularity and strength. Furthermore, this discrepancy can directly influence associated risks and impact public health interventions, serving as a critical determinant in shaping targeted policies, educational programs, and awareness initiatives. Therefore, understanding the differential usage rates between genders complements our broader comprehension of the implications and repercussions of anabolic steroids use.

In 2002, about 22,000 individuals were hospitalized due to complications associated with anabolic steroids in the US.

With a magnifying lens on the shadowy consequences of anabolic steroids usage, the 2002 statistic revealing 22,000 hospitalizations due to associated complications stands as an alarming testament to their dangerous impacts. In a virtual landscape awash with Steroid Statistics, this singular number offers a stark, tangible reminder of the real-world harm engendered by these substances, moving beyond the abstract to bring into sharp relief the human cost of steroid use. It underscores the urgency and significance of disseminating factual, unbiased information to raise awareness and ultimately curtail the indiscriminate consumption of anabolic steroids.

A 2018 study found up to 46% of people using anabolic steroids experience withdrawal symptoms when they stop using them.

In the realm of understanding the impacts of anabolic steroid use, this 2018 study sheds light on an often overlooked aspect – withdrawal symptoms. Highlighting that an alarming 46% of users experience such symptoms upon cessation, it underscores the addictive nature of these substances, pointing towards potential issues of dependency. This data point hence enhances the gravity of the steroid use narrative, encouraging readers to reevaluate their understanding of not only the immediate risks but also the longer-term fallout associated with anabolic steroid use.

As per the NIDA survey in 2015, less than 1% of high school seniors reported using anabolic steroids each year.

Unveiling a stark revelation, the 2015 NIDA survey draws attention to the minimal presence of anabolic steroids’ use among high school seniors, estimated at less than 1% annually. This statistic, subtly echoing through the cavernous realms of steroid usage information and its societal impact, becomes a beacon of hope in the landscape of adolescent health and drug misuse. By demystifying perceptions of pervasive steroid misuse among adolescents, it reiterates the efficacy of health promotion initiatives, drives informed discussion and revisits policy discourse in an important battle against a potential health crisis.

In 2020, 40% of bodybuilders in Lucknow, India were found using anabolic steroids.

Diving deep into the profound impacts of anabolic steroids usage, a startling revelation surfaces from Lucknow, India. A staggering 40% of bodybuilders in 2020 reportedly engaged in the usage of such substances. This piece of information not only brings to light the pervasive nature of steroids within the bodybuilding community but also foreshadows the potential risks that such demographic is willing to undertake, emphasizing an urgent necessity for intervention. Addressing this statistic on a blog post on Steroid Statistics unveils the severity of the issue, underlining the urgent imperative for educating athletes about the health implications of substance abuse and the need for strict regulation within the sport.

The use of anabolic steroids in elite sports is estimated to be between 1-6%, but it can be much higher in some sports.

Illuminating the foggy terrain of elite sports, the finding that anabolic steroid usage amongst top-tier athletes ranges from a relatively benign 1% to a more significant 6% injects a dose of reality into the discussion. This particular statistic breathes life into the barren landscape of mere numbers found in a blog post about Steroid Statistics. It invites readers to question the stereotypical image of drug-free competitions and prompts them to re-evaluate the sports ethos. Moreover, the possibility of certain sports shooting the percentile considerably higher is a cliffhanger that heightens the intrigue while also underscoring the concern over fairness and athletes’ health in these disciplines.

Research suggests that 30 million people in the United States have used anabolic steroids sometime in their life.

Highlighting the statistic that an estimated 30 million people in the United States have at some point utilized anabolic steroids can be an eye-opening observation in a blog focusing on Steroid Statistics. This figure underscores the widespread engagement with anabolic steroids, reflecting a broad societal issue rather than an isolated or minority concern. The enormity of this number evidences the demand for performance enhancement or body image adjustment that transcends age, gender or profession. Moreover, bearing this in mind can shape policies, efforts of awareness and more targeted interventions to manage this prevailing health issue.

Data from England shows a rise in admissions for anabolic steroid misuse from 29 in 2005 to 656 in 2015.

Illuminating the hidden corners of the steroid landscape, the exponential surge in admissions due to anabolic steroid misuse in England, rocketing from a mere 29 in 2005 to a staggering 656 in 2015, paints an alarming picture of the burgeoning issue. In a blog post centred around steroid statistics, this startling growth is emblematic of an escalating public health concern, prompting the need for heightened awareness, deeper research into steroid use and its repercussions, as well as advocating for more robust preventive measures.

In Greece, the misuse of anabolic steroids typically starts from the age of 16 years.

Highlighting the age at which anabolic steroid misuse begins, particularly in the context of a place like Greece, paints a striking picture of how early the problem can take root. This statistic reflects a pressing issue that not only pertains to health risks and fitness ethics, but also to the societal and parental responsibilities of nurturing a safe, health-conscious environment for adolescents. When blog readers learn that steroid abuse typically starts at the young age of 16, it brings an urgent human dimension to the data, fostering a deeper understanding of this public health concern and the necessity for educational efforts and preventive measures.

In 2019, the UK’s Office for National Statistics recorded 79 deaths involving image- and performance-enhancing drugs, 60 of which involved steroids.

The compelling figure of 60 out of 79 deaths involving steroids, as documented by the UK’s Office for National Statistics in 2019, punctuates the severity of steroid misuse in a visceral, striking manner. Serving as a stark reminder of the life-altering implications of performance-enhancing substances, this statistic captures the essence of the potential health risks and fatal consequences associated with these drugs. It echoes through the narrative of our blog post on Steroid Statistics, reinforcing the purpose of our analytical exploration – to unravel the true impact of steroids on users’ health and bring the unseen part of steroid usage to public attention.

The Controlled Substance Act of 1990 classified anabolic steroids as Schedule III drugs in the United States, carrying a maximum penalty of one year in prison and a $1,000 fine for a first drug offense.

In the realm of steroid statistics, the significance of the Controlled Substance Act of 1990 cannot be overstated. This seminal legislation, which categorized anabolic steroids as Schedule III drugs, underlines the weight of the law’s view on steroid use in the United States. It comes with a palpable punishment for first-time offenders: a year in prison coupled with a hefty $1,000 fine. It punches home the serious criminal consequences of steroid misuse, adding a layer of legal perspective to the discourse on steroid use and further enriching a blog post in this subject matter with its distinct socio-legal angle.

According to NIDA’s survey in 2019, about 7 in 1000 high school students in the US (below 1%) reported past-year use of anabolic steroid.

Painting a compelling portrait of the prevalence of anabolic steroid use among high school students, the NIDA’s survey sheds light on a significant, yet often overlooked, issue. Within the canvas of the broader steroid statistics landscape, this finding is a finely drawn line, highlighting that, albeit a relatively small percentage of US high school students, 7 in 1000 youths reported using anabolic steroids in the past year. This hints at a potential harbinger of health and societal concerns relating to steroid misuse among younger demographics. The subtlety of this figure underpins its significance, urging parents, educators, and policy-makers to turn a critical eye on this matter, for it is within these seemingly minuscule numbers that the narrative of future trends is often written.

A 2016 study found that almost half (47.4%) of people misusing steroids reported experiencing side effects.

In the realm of steroid use, understanding prevalence and ramifications isn’t just enlightening—it’s crucial. The 2016 study’s finding—that nearly one out of every two individuals misusing steroids reported experiencing side effects—gives substance to the discussions on steroid misuse and the risks involved. This dynamic figure vividly paints the picture of the hazardous implications of steroid misuse, further emphasizing the urgency and significance of addressing this issue in the context of the steroid statistics-dedicated blog post.

A 2001 survey found that one-third of steroid users in the United Kingdom had not consulted a physician.

Unveiling a significant reality on steroid use, the 2001 survey uncovers an alarming fact — one in every three steroid users in the United Kingdom, defying medical counsel, has taken to self-medication. This awareness assists in highlighting the pervasive degree of risk being undertaken by these individuals, as steroid misuse without professional oversight can induce grave health implications. Such a statistic, therefore, serves as an influential voice in the narrative of a blog post on Steroid Statistics, propelling a call-to-action for stronger public health interventions and enlightened user responsibility to mitigate such hazardous behaviors.

An adolescent self-report study revealed that lifetime prevalence rate for anabolic steroids in males aged 14 to 19 reached 11%.

Shining a spotlight on the disconcerting issue of anabolic steroid use, a study discloses an intriguing fact that we cannot ignore: an alarmingly high lifetime prevalence rate of 11% among males aged 14 to 19. This creates the backbone of our post today, showing an unsettling trend of early steroid consumption. Such data underpins the urgency to delve deeper into Steroid Statistics, demystifying associated risks and increasing awareness. By unmasking this reality, we stimulate a conversation about the implications of steroid use at such a tender age, paving the way toward necessary preventive measures and effective interventions.

According to the CDC’s 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System survey, approximately 4% of 12th-grade boys and 2.3% of 12th-grade girls reported lifetime use of steroids without a doctor’s prescription.

Unraveling steroid-related behavior among high school students, the 2017 CDC’s Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System survey lays bare the underlying reality that even at such tender age, an alarmingly small but significant percentage of 12th-grade students, 4% of boys and 2.3% of girls, have reported lifetime use of steroids sans a doctor’s prescription. This revelation, stowed within hard numbers, paints a picture of an impending menace within both gender groups, serving as a wake-up call for guardians, educators, and health authorities to formulate preventive strategies, round-the-clock education, and relentless awareness drives about the potential health ramifications of steroid misuse. Such stark figures act as a cornerstone for discourses around steroid statistics, essential for a blog post aiming to shed light on this issue.

Conclusion

Steroid statistics elucidate a troubling reality of the pervasiveness and negative impacts of illicit steroid use, particularly among athletes and bodybuilding enthusiasts. However, the numbers also underscore the necessity for increased awareness, preventive measures, and rehabilitative support to suppress steroid misuse. Trends suggest that continued dialogue, alongside scientific research and strengthened legislation, can drastically reduce the health implications arising from unlawful steroid administration. Understanding these statistics serves as a poignant reminder that the pursuit of physical performance and aesthetic improvement should not compromise one’s health and wellbeing.

References

0. – https://www.www.wada-ama.org

1. – https://www.www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov

2. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

3. – https://www.www.samhsa.gov

4. – https://www.www.ons.gov.uk

5. – https://www.pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

6. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

7. – https://www.www.researchgate.net

8. – https://www.www.gov.uk

9. – https://www.www.grandviewresearch.com

10. – https://www.www.drugabuse.gov

FAQs

What are steroids?

Steroids are a type of substances, frequently hormonal, that the body naturally produces. Steroids help promote cell growth and division, resulting in the growth of certain tissues, especially muscle.

Are all steroids harmful to the body?

Not all steroids are harmful. Some, like corticosteroids, are used in medicine to treat inflammation and autoimmune diseases. However, misuse of steroids, such as anabolic steroids often used by athletes for performance enhancement, can lead to severe health consequences.

Can steroids be addictive?

Yes, steroids can be addictive. They may not create the same kind of intense cravings as addictive drugs but ongoing misuse and dependence can lead to withdrawal symptoms if the person suddenly stops taking them.

What are the side effects of long-term steroid use?

Long-term steroid use can lead to significant health problems such as heart disease, liver disease, mood disorders, severe acne, and shrinkage of testicles in men, among others. For females, side effects can also include reduction in breast size, irregular menstrual cycles and masculinisation.

Are there legal ramifications for misuse of steroids?

Yes, in many countries the possession, trafficking, and use of anabolic steroids without a valid prescription is against the law and could result in fines, imprisonment or both. Regulations differ country by country, so one should always check local laws.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

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