GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Statistics About The Most Organisms Contain The Same Codons

The majority of organisms contain the same codons due to the universal genetic code shared by all living things.

Statistic 1

"61 out of the 64 possible codons encode 20 different kinds of amino acids - the building blocks of proteins."

Sources Icon

Statistic 2

"The three out of 64 possible codons are known as stop codons and they do not encode an amino acid."

Sources Icon

Statistic 3

"There are only 20 different kinds of ‘amino acids’ that can be combined to make a protein which are present in most organisms."

Sources Icon

Statistic 4

"Just one genetic code translates codons into amino acids in nearly all organisms."

Sources Icon

Statistic 5

"Codon usage bias, where specific codons are used more frequently than others, varies among species but the same codons are recognised across species."

Sources Icon

Statistic 6

"AUG, the codon for Methionine, acts as the "start" codon in most organisms."

Sources Icon

Statistic 7

"The 4^3 possible 64 triplets of nucleotides in the DNA language can be translated into just 20 amino acids in the protein language in most organisms."

Sources Icon

Statistic 8

"Some organisms use a slight variation of the universal genetic code, suggesting that the genetic code evolved over time."

Sources Icon

Statistic 9

"The codon bias in high expression genes is nearly the same in different organisms, further suggesting that most organisms contain the same codons."

Sources Icon

Statistic 10

"Codons are decoded by transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules, of which there are only about 40 in most organisms."

Sources Icon

Statistic 11

"Each tRNA can recognize a specific codon and carry the corresponding amino acid, ensuring that most organisms contain the same codons."

Sources Icon

Statistic 12

"Genes can be defined as segments of DNA made up of the right number and sequence of codons to make one or more specific proteins. Any two types of organisms share 99% of these genes."

Sources Icon

Statistic 13

"This is all according to the “central dogma” of molecular biology that states that DNA codes for RNA, which codes for proteins."

Sources Icon

Statistic 14

"Over 1 million codon alignments have been produced by the Codon Usage Database, demonstrating the universality of codon usage in organisms."

Sources Icon

Statistic 15

"Each amino acid corresponds to one or more codons. For example, leucine corresponds to six different codons."

Sources Icon

Statistic 16

"In protein synthesis, the choice of codon does not affect the ultimate structure and function of the protein, highlighting the interchangeability of codons in most organisms."

Sources Icon

Statistic 17

"Of the codons that specify the 20 amino acids, three signal the end of the protein-building process. All organisms respond to these "stop" signals in the same way."

Sources Icon

Statistic 18

"UGA, UAA, and UAG are the three stop codons that do not code for an amino acid but cause the protein to release from the ribosome."

Sources Icon

Statistic 19

"In bacteria and archaea, the same 20 amino acids are coded by the same 61 codons, with only a few minor exceptions."

Sources Icon

... Before You Leave, Catch This! 🔥

Your next business insight is just a subscription away. Our newsletter The Week in Data delivers the freshest statistics and trends directly to you. Stay informed, stay ahead—subscribe now.

Sign up for our newsletter and become the navigator of tomorrow's trends. Equip your strategy with unparalleled insights!