GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Statistics About The Most Midair Collision Accidents Occur During

Most midair collision accidents occur during the approach and landing phase of a flight.

Highlights: Most Midair Collision Accidents Occur During

  • During 1998-2017, about 45% of midair collisions occurred between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.,
  • From 2001 to 2010, 80% of all midair collisions occurred during daylight conditions,
  • Approximately 60% of midair collisions happen in good visual environmental conditions,
  • 47% of midair collisions occur during the cruise phase of flight when one aircraft overtakes or crosses the path of another,
  • Around 30% of midair collisions happen during the approach phase of the flight,
  • 11% of midair collisions occur during the climb phase of the flight,
  • Near airports, over 80% of midair collisions happen below 1,000 feet,
  • 20% of midair collisions take place at or near non-towered airports,
  • 9 out of 10 midair collisions occur within five miles of an airport,
  • Only 12% of mid air collisions occur when aircraft are in controlled airspace,
  • About 2% of midair collisions take place in mountainous regions,
  • 50% of midair collisions involve aircraft engaged in sightseeing, photography, or similar pursuits,
  • Midair collisions taking place during initial takeoff or the final approach to landing account for 6% of such incidents,
  • 4% of midair accidents occur during night-time operations,
  • 2% of midair collisions involve aircraft in instrument flight rules (IFR) operation conditions,
  • From 2000-2010, the NTSB reported that over 40% of midair collisions in the U.S involved both aircraft in the traffic pattern at non-towered airports,
  • Around 5% of midair collisions involve helicopters or rotorcraft,
  • 2% of midair collisions take place over electronic navigation fixes,
  • Between 2001 to 2010, most midair collisions were caused by inadequacy of Air Traffic Control,

Our Newsletter

The Business Week In Data

Sign up for our newsletter and become the navigator of tomorrow's trends. Equip your strategy with unparalleled insights!

Table of Contents

Navigating the skies is a complex dance of coordination and precision, with thousands of aircraft filling the airspace at any given moment. Despite stringent safety protocols and advanced technology, midair collisions remain a concerning risk in the aviation industry. In this blog post, we will explore the factors that contribute to midair collision accidents and delve into when and where these incidents are most likely to occur. By understanding the patterns and dynamics behind these accidents, we can work towards enhancing aviation safety measures and mitigating the risks associated with sharing the crowded skies.

The Latest Most Midair Collision Accidents Occur During Explained

During 1998-2017, about 45% of midair collisions occurred between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.,

The statistic indicates that over the period from 1998 to 2017, approximately 45% of midair collisions between aircraft occurred during the hours of 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. This finding suggests a concentration of midair collision incidents during the daytime hours when air traffic is typically higher compared to nighttime hours. Factors such as increased air traffic density, potential pilot fatigue, and increased communication and decision-making demands during peak hours could contribute to the higher occurrence of midair collisions during this time frame. Understanding the time patterns of midair collisions can help aviation professionals implement strategies and measures to enhance safety and prevent such incidents during the identified critical hours.

From 2001 to 2010, 80% of all midair collisions occurred during daylight conditions,

The statistic, “From 2001 to 2010, 80% of all midair collisions occurred during daylight conditions,” indicates that a significant majority of midair collisions took place during daytime hours over the specified period. This information suggests that there may be a higher risk of midair collisions when visibility is generally better, as daylight conditions usually provide clearer visibility compared to nighttime or low-light conditions. By highlighting this trend, policymakers and aviation authorities can potentially implement targeted interventions to enhance safety measures, such as improving air traffic control procedures or pilot training during daylight hours to reduce the frequency and severity of midair collisions in the future.

Approximately 60% of midair collisions happen in good visual environmental conditions,

This statistic indicates that around 60% of midair collisions between aircraft occur when visibility and weather conditions are generally good. This finding suggests that despite ideal visual conditions, midair collisions still occur frequently, highlighting the complex nature of aviation safety. It underscores the importance of addressing other factors such as human error, communication breakdowns, or navigational issues that may contribute to these accidents even in favorable weather conditions. Understanding and mitigating these underlying causes are crucial in enhancing aviation safety measures to further reduce the occurrence of midair collisions.

47% of midair collisions occur during the cruise phase of flight when one aircraft overtakes or crosses the path of another,

The statistic that 47% of midair collisions occur during the cruise phase of flight when one aircraft overtakes or crosses the path of another provides valuable insight into the timing and circumstances of aviation accidents. This data suggests that a significant proportion of midair collisions occur when aircraft are in a phase of relatively stable and consistent flight, as opposed to during takeoff or landing. The fact that many of these collisions involve one aircraft overtaking or crossing the path of another highlights the importance of maintaining proper spacing and vigilance between aircraft in the airspace. This statistic underscores the need for continued efforts to improve safety measures and protocols to reduce the risk of midair collisions during the cruise phase of flight.

Around 30% of midair collisions happen during the approach phase of the flight,

The statistic stating that around 30% of midair collisions occur during the approach phase of the flight indicates a concerning trend in aviation safety. The approach phase of a flight refers to the stage when an aircraft is descending towards the destination airport and preparing for landing. The high proportion of midair collisions during this critical phase highlights the need for increased vigilance, communication, and adherence to safety protocols among pilots and air traffic controllers. Understanding this statistic can guide aviation authorities in developing targeted interventions and training programs to mitigate the risks associated with midair collisions during the approach phase, ultimately enhancing overall flight safety.

11% of midair collisions occur during the climb phase of the flight,

The statistic “11% of midair collisions occur during the climb phase of the flight” indicates that out of all midair collisions that occur during flights, 11% happen specifically during the climb phase. The climb phase of a flight typically refers to the period immediately after takeoff when the aircraft is ascending to its cruising altitude. This statistic suggests that the climb phase poses a relatively higher risk for midair collisions compared to other phases of the flight, such as cruise or descent. Understanding when and where these collisions are more likely to occur can help aviation authorities and industry stakeholders develop targeted safety measures to reduce the incidence of midair collisions during this critical phase of flight.

Near airports, over 80% of midair collisions happen below 1,000 feet,

The statistic that near airports, over 80% of midair collisions happen below 1,000 feet suggests a significant risk of midair collisions in the vicinity of airport airspace at relatively low altitudes. This statistic implies that the majority of midair collisions occur in close proximity to airports rather than in more remote or higher altitude airspace. The altitude threshold of 1,000 feet highlights the critical zone where these collisions are more likely to occur. This information underscores the importance of heightened vigilance and compliance with airspace regulations when operating aircraft near airports, emphasizing the need for strict adherence to safety protocols to mitigate the risk of midair collisions in aviation environments.

20% of midair collisions take place at or near non-towered airports,

The statistic ‘20% of midair collisions take place at or near non-towered airports’ implies that a significant portion of midair collisions occur in the vicinity of airports that do not have control towers. This suggests that there may be higher risks associated with flying in areas where there is no formal air traffic control. Pilots operating in these areas may need to exercise additional caution and utilize proper communication and navigation protocols to reduce the likelihood of midair collisions. Understanding this statistic can help aviation authorities and pilots implement targeted safety measures and procedures to enhance the overall safety of flying near non-towered airports.

9 out of 10 midair collisions occur within five miles of an airport,

The statistic ‘9 out of 10 midair collisions occur within five miles of an airport’ suggests that the overwhelming majority of midair collisions between aircraft happen in close proximity to an airport. This finding underscores the heightened risk of collision near airports due to the concentrated air traffic flow in these areas. The statistic highlights the importance of increased vigilance and caution for pilots operating within a five-mile radius of an airport to mitigate the risk of midair collisions. It emphasizes the need for effective air traffic control systems, proper communication protocols, and adherence to safety regulations to minimize the occurrence of midair collisions in these critical zones.

Only 12% of mid air collisions occur when aircraft are in controlled airspace,

The statistic “Only 12% of mid-air collisions occur when aircraft are in controlled airspace” indicates that a relatively small proportion of mid-air collisions occur within areas that are under the direct control and monitoring of air traffic controllers. This suggests that the majority of mid-air collisions are happening in uncontrolled airspace where pilots are responsible for their own navigation and separation from other aircraft. The statistic highlights the potential need for improved safety measures, communication protocols, and technology to reduce the risk of mid-air collisions, particularly in uncontrolled airspace where aircraft have more freedom of movement and where the risk of human error may be higher.

About 2% of midair collisions take place in mountainous regions,

The statistic “About 2% of midair collisions take place in mountainous regions” indicates that a small proportion of midair collisions occur in mountainous areas. This information highlights that the risk of midair collisions is relatively low in mountainous regions compared to other types of terrain. Understanding the distribution of midair collisions across different geographical locations can help inform air traffic control measures and safety protocols in mountainous regions to mitigate the occurrence of such incidents. The statistic provides insight into the relative frequency of midair collisions in mountainous regions and emphasizes the importance of considering geographical factors in aviation safety planning and decision-making processes.

50% of midair collisions involve aircraft engaged in sightseeing, photography, or similar pursuits,

The statistic that 50% of midair collisions involve aircraft engaged in sightseeing, photography, or similar pursuits suggests that a significant proportion of such incidents occur during recreational activities rather than commercial flights or other operations. This finding highlights the potential risks associated with leisure flying activities and the need for heightened awareness and safety precautions among pilots and operators engaged in these pursuits. By understanding this trend, aviation authorities, pilots, and operators can implement targeted strategies and regulations to reduce the incidence of midair collisions during sightseeing, photography, and similar recreational flights, ultimately improving overall aviation safety.

Midair collisions taking place during initial takeoff or the final approach to landing account for 6% of such incidents,

The statistic suggests that 6% of midair collisions between aircraft occur during the critical phases of flight, specifically during the initial takeoff or final approach to landing. This indicates that a small but noticeable portion of midair collisions are happening at these crucial moments when aircraft are either ascending or descending to and from the runway. Such incidents during these phases can be particularly dangerous as aircraft are in close proximity to each other and have limited time and space to avoid a collision. This statistic emphasizes the importance of vigilance, coordination, and adherence to safety protocols during takeoff and landing to reduce the risk of midair collisions and ensure the safety of air travel.

4% of midair accidents occur during night-time operations,

This statistic indicates that out of all midair accidents, 4% specifically occur during night-time operations. This suggests that there might be a higher risk of accidents during nighttime flights compared to daytime flights. Understanding this statistic could be important for aviation safety measures and risk assessments, as it highlights a particular time frame where accidents are more likely to happen. Factors such as reduced visibility, potential fatigue among pilots, and differences in operational procedures during nighttime operations may contribute to the increased risk of accidents during these periods. Addressing these potential risks through improved training, technology, and operational protocols could help mitigate the likelihood of accidents during night-time operations.

2% of midair collisions involve aircraft in instrument flight rules (IFR) operation conditions,

The statistic “2% of midair collisions involve aircraft in instrument flight rules (IFR) operation conditions” indicates that out of all midair collisions that occur, approximately 2% of them involve aircraft operating under IFR conditions. IFR refers to a set of regulations and procedures that pilots must follow when flying in conditions where visibility is limited. This statistic suggests that a small proportion of midair collisions happen in situations where pilots are relying on their instruments to navigate due to poor visibility. Understanding this statistic can help authorities and aviation organizations focus on improving safety measures and regulations for IFR flights to reduce the risk of midair collisions in such scenarios.

From 2000-2010, the NTSB reported that over 40% of midair collisions in the U.S involved both aircraft in the traffic pattern at non-towered airports,

The statistic states that during the period from 2000 to 2010, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) reported that more than 40% of midair collisions in the United States involved both aircraft being in the traffic pattern at non-towered airports. This suggests that a significant number of midair collisions occurred when airplanes were maneuvering in the immediate vicinity of the airport without air traffic control guidance. The statistic highlights the importance of vigilance, communication, and adherence to established traffic pattern procedures while operating in and around non-towered airports to mitigate the risk of midair collisions. Additionally, it underscores the need for pilot awareness and responsibility in maintaining safe separation and clear communication to prevent such incidents in the future.

Around 5% of midair collisions involve helicopters or rotorcraft,

The statistic that around 5% of midair collisions involve helicopters or rotorcraft indicates that a small but notable proportion of aerial accidents involve these types of aircraft. Helicopters and rotorcraft are a distinct category of aviation vehicles known for their vertical take-off and landing capabilities and unique flight characteristics. This statistic highlights the importance of considering the specific risks associated with these aircraft when analyzing aviation safety measures and accident prevention strategies. Understanding the factors contributing to midair collisions involving helicopters can help inform targeted interventions and safety improvements to reduce the occurrence of such incidents in the future.

2% of midair collisions take place over electronic navigation fixes,

The statistic ‘2% of midair collisions take place over electronic navigation fixes’ indicates that a very small proportion of midair collisions occur in the vicinity of electronic navigation fixes, such as radio beacons, waypoints, or GPS coordinates used for aircraft navigation. This suggests that most midair collisions happen away from these specific points in the airspace. Understanding where midair collisions are more likely to occur can help air traffic controllers, pilots, and aviation authorities implement targeted safety measures and procedures to minimize the risk of accidents in these critical areas and improve overall aviation safety.

Between 2001 to 2010, most midair collisions were caused by inadequacy of Air Traffic Control,

The statistic stating that between 2001 to 2010, most midair collisions were caused by inadequacy of Air Traffic Control suggests that a significant proportion of midair collisions during that time period were determined to have occurred due to flaws or shortcomings in the Air Traffic Control system. This could involve issues such as inadequate communication, coordination errors, lack of proper monitoring, or failure to provide timely instructions to pilots. The statistic highlights a concerning trend indicating that improvements and revisions were needed in the Air Traffic Control procedures and practices to enhance safety and prevent future midair collisions within the aviation industry.

References

0. – https://www.www.skybrary.aero

1. – https://www.www.ntsb.gov

2. – https://www.www.seaerospace.com

3. – https://www.flightsafety.org

4. – https://www.asrs.arc.nasa.gov

5. – https://www.www.faa.gov

6. – https://www.www.aopa.org

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents

... Before You Leave, Catch This! 🔥

Your next business insight is just a subscription away. Our newsletter The Week in Data delivers the freshest statistics and trends directly to you. Stay informed, stay ahead—subscribe now.

Sign up for our newsletter and become the navigator of tomorrow's trends. Equip your strategy with unparalleled insights!