GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2024

Hepatitis A Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Hepatitis A Statistics

  • In 2016, approximately 1.4 million cases of hepatitis A occurred globally.
  • About 11,000 people were reported to have Hepatitis A in the US in 2017.
  • Hepatitis A rates have declined by more than 95% since the hepatitis A vaccine first became available in 1995.
  • In 2019, a total of 318 hepatitis A cases from 36 states were reported in US.
  • Throughout the Americas, 3,648 confirmed cases of hepatitis A were reported in 2017.
  • In 2019, the southwest region of Ethiopia, reported 5674 suspected cases of hepatitis A.
  • In 2018, about 51% of the reported cases were associated with large-scale outbreaks of hepatitis A.
  • In EU/EEA countries, Hepatitis A cases decreased from over 12,000 in 2013 to around 8,500 cases in 2018.
  • In 2017, children younger than five experienced an 86% reduction in hepatitis A incidence compared with the pre-vaccine baseline.
  • Hepatitis A caused about 11,000 deaths in 2015, or 0.7% of the global total.
  • The case fatality rate for hepatitis A ranges from 0.3 to 0.6% of cases in general.
  • About 92% of adolescents in the US (aged 13-17 years) were not vaccinated against hepatitis A in 2017.
  • In 2014, over half of the individuals diagnosed with hepatitis A in England and Wales had reported history of travel abroad.
  • In 2017, Italy had the highest rate of Hepatitis A among the EU/EEA countries, with 10.6 cases per 100,000 citizens.
  • In Japan, Hepatitis A decreased from 467 cases in 2008 to 97 cases in 2015.
  • In 2018, Poland reported the highest increase in Hepatitis A cases among EU/EEA countries.
  • New Zealand reported 22 cases of Hepatitis A in 2019, nearly half of what was reported in 2018.
  • In 2019, a total of 125 cases of hepatitis A were notified in Ireland, an increase of 47% compared to 2018.

Table of Contents

Understanding the full scope of Hepatitis A can be enhanced by studying its statistics. In this blog post, we will delve into the critical figures and data revolving around Hepatitis A, a highly contagious liver infection caused by the Hepatitis A virus. From prevalence rates across different regions and demographics to recovery rates and the effectiveness of preventive measures, our exploration of factual number-based information will provide an insightful look into this global health concern.

The Latest Hepatitis A Statistics Unveiled

In 2016, approximately 1.4 million cases of hepatitis A occurred globally.

This compelling figure of approximately 1.4 million cases of Hepatitis A in 2016 globally, adds substance to the worldwide dimension and impact of the disease. In the grand scheme of public health concerns, it emphatically underscores the urgency for a more robust intervention, prevention programs and potential countermeasures against Hepatitis A. This significant datum also impresses upon readers the enormity of the problem, affirming Hepatitis A as a severe health issue with global repercussions, thus anchoring its relevance within the overarching context of Hepatitis A statistics.

About 11,000 people were reported to have Hepatitis A in the US in 2017.

In the grand canvas of Hepatitis A statistics, the remarkable number of approximately 11,000 reported cases in the United States in 2017 presents a poignant picture of the persistent challenge that this illness poses. This figure not only underscores the significant health burden of Hepatitis A nationally, but it also intensifies the conversation around the imperative need for improved preventive measures, comprehensive patient care, and public awareness campaigns. Moreover, it serves as a sobering reminder that Hepatitis A remains a pressing health issue even in developed nations like the US, inviting efforts toward a more robust solution.

Hepatitis A rates have declined by more than 95% since the hepatitis A vaccine first became available in 1995.

When diving into the ocean of Hepatitis A Statistics, one pearl of data stands out strikingly – the phenomenal 95% decline in Hepatitis A rates since the inception of the Hepatitis A vaccine in 1995. Upon first glance, this statistic shines a spotlight on the tremendous strides science has made in combating this infectious disease. Yet, it also carries subtler undertones of a potential roadmap for future public health strategies. By showcasing the potent power of preventive medicine, this single number imbues a renewed urgency to advocate for swift vaccine development and distribution. In the narrative of Hepatitis A, this statistic represents the triumphant victory of human innovation over a once formidable foe.

In 2019, a total of 318 hepatitis A cases from 36 states were reported in US.

The alarming number of 318 reported Hepatitis A cases from 36 states late in 2019 arguably illuminates the need for heightened awareness, public education, and proactive response measures to control this infectious disease in the United States. Featured prominently in our Hepatitis A Statistics blog post, this figure provides a tangible perspective of the extent of Hepatitis A’s grasp across the nation, allowing readers to comprehend the significance of its impact on public health. Therefore, this statistic, grim as it is, serves to emphasize the story our blog post aims to tell about the seriousness of Hepatitis A as it continues to touch lives across multiple states.

Throughout the Americas, 3,648 confirmed cases of hepatitis A were reported in 2017.

The statistic of 3,648 confirmed cases of hepatitis A reported across the Americas in 2017 shines a spotlight on the pervasive reach of this infectious disease, acting as a stern reminder of the pressing need for public health awareness and intervention. Within the context of a blog post on Hepatitis A Statistics, this number offers a tangible snapshot of the scale of the problem in a single year, further underlining the ongoing relevance and urgency of this public health issue. This figure, therefore, not only highlights the volume of individuals directly affected, but also signifies a compelling call-to-action for enhanced disease prevention measures and improved vaccination coverage.

In 2019, the southwest region of Ethiopia, reported 5674 suspected cases of hepatitis A.

Highlighting the report from the southwest region of Ethiopia, which revealed a staggering 5674 suspected cases of Hepatitis A in 2019, serves as an eye-opener to the gravity of this health crisis. In the field of Hepatitis A Statistics, this figure not only shows the magnitude of the problem in a specific geographical region but also signifies the potential threat it poses to other, perhaps seemingly unaffected, areas of the country or globe. Such a high incidence rate underlines the need for increased public health intervention, including awarenes, vaccination programs, and research to ensure the containment and mitigation of this highly contagious disease.

In 2018, about 51% of the reported cases were associated with large-scale outbreaks of hepatitis A.

Unraveling the 2018 statistical tapestry of Hepatitis A illuminates a crucial insight – the prevalence of large-scale outbreaks capturing approximately 51% of all reported cases. This figure pulls up a red flag, signaling the sizeable challenge public health officials grapple with in managing the disease spread, particularly in communities and settings susceptible to outbreaks. Furthermore, this underlines the vital significance of prevention strategies, including vaccination and hygiene measures, to win the battle against this highly infectious liver disease. Therefore, in a blog post on Hepatitis A statistics, this statistic is more than just a number; it launches a comprehensive discussion on the disease trend, its epidemiology, and the urgency to bolster preventive action.

In EU/EEA countries, Hepatitis A cases decreased from over 12,000 in 2013 to around 8,500 cases in 2018.

This noteworthy reduction in Hepatitis A cases in EU/EEA countries from 2013 to 2018 amplifies the advancements in healthcare methodologies and prevention strategies. The decrease from over 12,000 to roughly 8,500 cases exemplifies the effectiveness of policy changes, increased public awareness and improved vaccination campaigns targeting the disease. On a broader scale, illustrating such outcome in a blog post on Hepatitis A statistics can significantly encourage continued enhance in health interventions, as well as motivate individuals to participate in such public health programs to further drive down the cases.

In 2017, children younger than five experienced an 86% reduction in hepatitis A incidence compared with the pre-vaccine baseline.

Highlighting the remarkable 86% reduction in Hepatitis A incidence among children under five compared to the pre-vaccine baseline in 2017, we delve into a transformative public health victory. This figure underscores not only the impressive strides made in disease prevention software, but it also proves the profound impact of vaccination initiatives on children’s health. In the granular analysis of Hepatitis A statistics, such a precipitous decline accentuates the pivotal role vaccines play in curbing the spread of this infectious disease, thereby demonstrating the power and urgency of continued global immunization efforts.

Hepatitis A caused about 11,000 deaths in 2015, or 0.7% of the global total.

Shedding light on the gravity of Hepatitis A, the stark figure of 11,000 deaths or 0.7% of the global total in 2015, crafts a compelling narrative of the disease’s global impact. This fact, unequivocally, highlights the significance of Hepatitis A on a global scale, demonstrating the urgency and necessity to combat this malady. Not only does it underline the need for increased awareness about disease prevention, but it also underscores the vital importance of vaccination and proper sanitation practices. Equally, it affirms the necessity for further research and resources to be allocated towards curbing its potentially fatal consequences.

The case fatality rate for hepatitis A ranges from 0.3 to 0.6% of cases in general.

In the realm of Hepatitis A discussions, the case fatality rate is a crucial pulsating figure, shifting between 0.3 to 0.6% of cases. This parameter doesn’t only encapsulate the potential severity of the disease, but it also throws a spotlight on the existential threat it poses. When we plunge into the depths of understanding the real impact of Hepatitis A, this statistic looms large, bristling with insights, providing a clear benchmark of the disease’s deadliness. It ultimately allows readers to grasp its seriousness, influencing prevention efforts and shaping the narrative of discussions in the Hepatitis A domain.

About 92% of adolescents in the US (aged 13-17 years) were not vaccinated against hepatitis A in 2017.

Painting a vivid image of the adolescent vaccination landscape in the US, this statistic sounds an alarm bell on the urgent need for improved hepatitis A prevention. Despite the existence of an effective vaccine, a shocking 92% of American teenagers remained unprotected against this potentially serious illness in 2017. Woven into a blog post on Hepatitis A Statistics, this number not only spotlights the enormous gap in vaccine coverage but importantly, it also sets the stage for a pressing discussion on underlying reasons and potential strategies to elevate the public health response to hepatitis A.

In 2014, over half of the individuals diagnosed with hepatitis A in England and Wales had reported history of travel abroad.

Illuminating an underappreciated facet of public health, the data from 2014 reveals that over half of those diagnosed with Hepatitis A in England and Wales had a common thread – a history of travel abroad. This statistic vibrantly underscores not only the heightened risk posed by international travel when it comes to Hepatitis A transmission, but also emphasises the importance of adopting preventive measures like vaccinations and maintaining hygiene standards while traveling. Furthermore, it pushes us to ponder global disparities in health safety standards and the role travellers unwittingly play as carriers in the disease propagation.

In 2017, Italy had the highest rate of Hepatitis A among the EU/EEA countries, with 10.6 cases per 100,000 citizens.

Throwing light on the distinct prevalence of Hepatitis A across European nations, the 2017 data illuminates Italy’s exceptional circumstance as leading the EU/EEA countries in terms of Hepatitis A incidence rates. Capturing an alarming 10.6 cases per 100,000 citizens, Italy’s standing acts as a vital barometer of the sizeable infectious outbreaks beyond regular seasonal upticks or sporadic clusters of this preventable disease. Behind this figure lies a montage of implications—from the efficacy of existing vaccination strategies and healthcare systems’ robustness, to the underlying societal behaviors and lifestyle practices. Above all, it is a compelling call to intensify international and national efforts alike towards the prevention and control measures of this contagious liver disease.

In Japan, Hepatitis A decreased from 467 cases in 2008 to 97 cases in 2015.

Drawing attention to the sharp decline in Hepatitis A cases in Japan, from 467 in 2008 to a mere 97 in 2015, brings an optimistic perspective in a statistical exploration of the disease. It underscores a triumph against Hepatitis A, demonstrating the success of sustained healthcare efforts in the country. This remarkable transformation also serves as proof that certain measures in disease control can yield significant results over time. In the context of global Hepatitis A statistics, these numbers from Japan provide a beacon of hope and a valuable case study for preventive strategies for other nations struggling with the disease.

In 2018, Poland reported the highest increase in Hepatitis A cases among EU/EEA countries.

The significance of the 2018 statistic, wherein Poland reported the highest increase in Hepatitis A cases among EU/EEA countries, lies beneath its blatant indication of an alarming health concern. As a pillar of a blog post about Hepatitis A statistics, it underlines the assertion that Hepatitis A is an evolving issue requiring sustained attention. Poland’s case becomes a poignant narrative, a focal point for visualizing the otherwise abstract rise in disease prevalence, sparking curiosity about root causes, implications, and potential solutions. This statistic not only demonstrates the geographical severity of the illness, but also heightens global relevance, prompting readers to question these spikes and advocate for preventive measures.

New Zealand reported 22 cases of Hepatitis A in 2019, nearly half of what was reported in 2018.

In the arena of Hepatitis A Statistics, New Zealand’s data for 2019 serves as a beacon of hope, showing a noteworthy reduction in cases. The numbers depict an almost fifty percent slump in Hepatitis A incidents compared to the prior year—down to 22 from an undoubtedly higher figure in 2018. This presents a significant milestone in understanding the efficacy of public health initiatives, preventive standards, and access to medical care in curbing the incidence of the disease. Furthermore, it could potentially provide valuable insight for other countries grappling with Hepatitis A control, alongside informing the strategies and targets for future reduction efforts on a global scale.

In 2019, a total of 125 cases of hepatitis A were notified in Ireland, an increase of 47% compared to 2018.

Painting a vivid picture of the escalating battle against Hepatitis A in Ireland, the statistic underscores a substantial leap of 47% in reported cases in 2019 from the previous year’s tally. Not confined to mere numerals, the statistic provides a tangible grasp of the seriousness of the issue, illuminating the expanding footprint of Hepatitis A across the nation. Nestled at the intersection of healthcare, social concern, and statistical trends, this numeric testament reflects the urgency of bolstered preventive measures and powerful awareness campaigns. This is not just a number, but a call to arms against a lurking health threat.

Conclusion

In closing, the Hepatitis A statistics underscore the critical need for more intensive health education and preventative strategies worldwide. These numbers reflect the importance of routine vaccination, improved sanitation, and adequate provision of clean water, especially in resource-limited settings with high prevalence. Despite significant progress over the past decades, continuous efforts are required to monitor trends, understand underlying factors driving these figures, and design effective interventions to further combat Hepatitis A’s global impact.

References

0. – https://www.www.paho.org

1. – https://www.pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

2. – https://www.www.jstor.org

3. – https://www.www.researchgate.net

4. – https://www.www.afro.who.int

5. – https://www.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

6. – https://www.www.hpsc.ie

7. – https://www.surv.esr.cri.nz

8. – https://www.www.cdc.gov

9. – https://www.academic.oup.com

10. – https://www.www.ecdc.europa.eu

11. – https://www.www.who.int

FAQs

What is Hepatitis A?

Hepatitis A is a viral liver disease that can cause mild to severe illness. It's caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). It is usually transmitted through the ingestion of contaminated food and water or through direct contact with an infectious person.

What are the symptoms of Hepatitis A?

Symptoms of Hepatitis A may include fatigue, nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, especially near the liver, fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, muscle pain, itching, and yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice). However, not everyone with Hepatitis A develops symptoms.

How is Hepatitis A transmitted?

Hepatitis A is primarily spread when people eat or drink something contaminated with feces of an infected person or have close personal contact with an infected person. It's not spread through sneezing or coughing.

How can Hepatitis A be prevented?

The best way to prevent hepatitis A is through vaccination. Other effective ways to prevent transmission are adequate supply of safe drinking water, good sanitation, proper disposal of sewage, and personal hygiene practices like regular handwashing.

Is there a cure for Hepatitis A?

There is no specific treatment for Hepatitis A. The body will clear the virus on its own in most cases. It is, however, important to manage the symptoms and proper rest and hydration is recommended. Severe cases may require hospitalization.

How we write our statistic reports:

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly.

See our Editorial Process.

Table of Contents